48 kHz audio in Camtasia 9

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  • Updated 10 months ago
Hello everyone,
We know from previous posts (https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/problems_with_48_khz_audio) that 48 kHz audio is not supported in Camtasia 8.x.  For our company, we use capture technology that can only out put 48 kHz quality.  When I saw Camtasia 9 release, I was very hopeful to see something about support on 48 kHz. Our company is looking for justification on the upgrade to Camtasia 9, and full 48k support would be a huge part of that.

I was very excited to pull in some 48 kHz audio (.mp4 files with 1080p video and 48k audio) and hear it play back OK on the timeline! AND even though the project produced at 44.1 kHz, it sounds great. Unfortunately, the audio-video sync drifts when I produce a few of these test .mp4 files -- leading me to think full 48k support is not here yet.

Bottom line question, can someone from TS fill us in on what enhancements were made with respect to 48 kHz audio in v9?
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drbooshkit

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  • unsure if Camtasia 9 can be justified for our company

Posted 2 years ago

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drbooshkit

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Quick sample files:
Raw Logitech Capture, w/ 48kHz audio and “lossless” video setting: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2pqehM_KEOjdmEwamkycTRmQlk/view?usp=sharing

 

Produced from Camtasia 9, 256kbps audio quality 50% video quality: https://drive.google.com/file/d/0B2pqehM_KEOjdldLM3k1a3ItSzQ/view?usp=sharing

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rg

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I wouldn't think 29.95fps is unusual or odd; it is the SMPTE standard for broadcast video, isn't it?  That frame rate is why chronologically-accurate time code must be drop-frame (which was always an annoyance in the ancient days when you might have to calculate insert shots precisely).
(Edited)
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frank.heney

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29.97 is the standard. 29.95 is odd
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SMPTE_timecode
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rg

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You're right.  I never noticed the 5 instead of the 7.  Is that even possible anywhere?
(Edited)
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frank.heney

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I guess the hardware creating the video may be involved?
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rg

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I would assume it's the encoding process -- but what video encoder would enable such a strangely nonstandard frame rate?  I understand how the various standards evolved, but why would an encoder make something deviate from standards by 2%?  Maybe the post just had a minor typo -- nothing else makes sense.