Attribution

  • 1
  • Question
  • Updated 4 years ago
  • Answered
I am thinking about creating courses on Udemy.  I started looking into Presenter Media for my videos.  I called them up and asked them about attribution.  They didn't give me an exact response, but expected some kind of attribution for the use of their work.  If I create a course with 40 lecture videos where should i give attribution to using images/templates from Presenter Media?
Photo of dan

dan

  • 46 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
  • amused

Posted 4 years ago

  • 1
Photo of Timbre4

Timbre4, Champion

  • 680 Posts
  • 273 Reply Likes

Hello,

If they weren't any more specific about it, I'd think a small mention in your text credits at the end of a segment would suffice.

It could be stored on a slide element or in your Clip Bin library; created once, used 40 times.


(Edited)
Photo of dan

dan

  • 46 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Thanks for the response.
Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5520 Posts
  • 2601 Reply Likes
Interestng - You pay for the ability to download media from PresenterMedia. I use their content all the time and never gave it a second thought about crediting them in any video. I have classes on Udemy as well. I've never encountered an issue from either PresenterMedia or Udemy.

Sure, if they were allowing you to use their stuff in return for a mention I might see some sort of a requirement. But I always figured that since I'm paying them for that...

I guess your mileage may vary.

Cheers... Rick :)
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 7135 Posts
  • 3873 Reply Likes
I suggest you take a very close look at Presenter-Media's policy.
 
Here's the thing about using copyrighted video clips.  When you render a new video using one of those clips. The metadata associated with that clip is not transferred to the video.

Therefor it is a copyright violation that cannot be easily traced or caught.
 It is a violation just the same and if the company learns of your videos or sees them for any reason it could land you in hot water.

 I've been producing videos professionally for quite some time now. I could be sued by my client and the owner of the copyrighted materials over one video. The copyright owners sue the client who uploaded or distributed the video and then your client counter-sues you.
I've been there and you don't want to go down that road.

Regards, Joe
(Edited)
Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5520 Posts
  • 2601 Reply Likes
Hmmm, it was my own understanding that PresenterMedia has their own staff of artists creating the assets they sell. Most of what they have are what I call the little "alien" type people.

I totally get that one needs to be super careful. And especially so if you are producing work for others.

Out of curiosity, I might think there would be some sort of insurance one might acquire that would cover any accidental issues that would arise. I mean, it's one thing to knowingly and blatantly take work others have created and use it as your own. But with any of these sites where you pay to use material such as Digital Juice, Presenter Media and others, you are just relying on their word for it that it's safe to use, no?

Cheers... Rick :)
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 7135 Posts
  • 3873 Reply Likes
"Ignorance of the law excuses no man. Not that all men know the law, but because it's an excuse every man will plead, and no man can tell how to refute him."

If you could purchase insurance that protects you from poor business decisions .
I think the insurance company would go out of business saving their clients.

That's my 2 cents.
Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5520 Posts
  • 2601 Reply Likes
So, what you are saying then is that no service you pay for is actually reliable and the only way to ensure you have no issues is to personally film or create anything that will be used.

In a similar vein, I was in a recent class where an IP attorney gave a presentation about things that were IP related. The general takeaway was that unless you have a massive amount of money to defend things like patents or copyrights, the average person should basically forget about the effort and expense involved in obtaining one. He cited that the average cost of defending said patent or copyright was around $500,000.
Photo of dan

dan

  • 46 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Anybody use the Techsmith recommended Callouts.com?
Photo of Kelly Mullins

Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

  • 2886 Posts
  • 643 Reply Likes
Hello,
In regards to using Presenter Media, even if you purchase a subscription, they require attribution for some use cases including e-learning and other videos.

You can read more about that here:
http://www.presentermedia.com/eula.html

I would do as Joe and Timbre4 suggest and err on the side of caution by adding a mention of usage on the last title slide of your video under a Credits sort of section.

Kelly
User Assistance
TechSmith
Photo of dan

dan

  • 46 Posts
  • 1 Reply Like
Thanks
Photo of Joe Morgan

Joe Morgan

  • 7135 Posts
  • 3873 Reply Likes

Well Rick,

I did not say or suggest that any media service you pay for is unreliable and I certainly didn’t suggest the only way to create videos and avoid legal issues would be to personally film or create everything that will be used in the production.

As I read the first comment you posted I surmised that you’ve probably been uploading videos that are in violation of copyright law and that could place you in the unfortunate position of being sued.

My only goal in responding was to help you avoid that scenario. I even subjected myself to the humility of admitting that I made the same mistake myself.

When you purchase and download media from the companies that provide them you must first agree to adhere to their policies. If you violate those policies or don’t understand them, the responsibility ultimately falls on your shoulders.

I don’t see the connection between what an attorney told you about obtaining a copyright for yourself has to do with using copyrighted materials you have obtained from a vendor.

In the future you might want to be more careful when it comes to discussing your legal practices in a public forum.

Regards, Joe

Photo of Rick Stone

Rick Stone

  • 5520 Posts
  • 2601 Reply Likes
LOL, I never claim to be an attorney nor did I sleep at a Holiday Inn Express last night. ;)

My only point with mentioning the legal stuff was that it seems to me that unless someone is blatantly taking Disney materials and offering videos for sale, I might think the odds of getting sued are pretty remote.

Not that I'm condoning or suggesting that anyone break the law. ;)

Hey ho, to each their own. I've seen reports in this forum of folks using material supplied directly inside Camtasia itself and getting called down on a DMCA violation on YouTube and videos removed as a result.

Tricksy situations that are creativity killers!

https://www.ted.com/talks/larry_lessi...

Have a good day, all! Rick :)