Audio Crossfade - When will we have it?

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I would like to think that I am not missing this just because I am an audio engineer, but I am really missing a basic crossfade feature. I'm head-scratching at how this was missed over so many versions of the product, and with respect to how many features there are in program right now.

Is this ever going to be a feature? As it stands now, I am only using this (expensive) software to record, add a mouse effect, use an intro I like and then render out of it so I can get it into Premiere Pro.
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robkellysound

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Posted 3 months ago

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Joe Morgan

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Well,
TechSmith has me scratching my head over many of their choices.
I wouldn't hold my breath.
You can try crossing your fingers.

Regards,Joe
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robkellysound

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Thanks for the reply... That is a great pity and a PITA.
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cbkr.team

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I might be missing something here, in terms of what you're after, but I believe you can already do this in Camtasia, because I've done it.

Assuming you're not talking about something more complicated, then at its simplest, cross-fade is fading out one sound source while fading in another at the same time, to get a seamless transition. You can do this in Camtasia, by placing an audio fade-out on the audio track you're fading out of, and placing an audio fade-in on the audio track you're fading in. The length of fades you choose, and the positioning of the tracks relative to each other, determine how the transition works. I've done this on two-camera projects.

You also need to chop up the tracks into sections, so you can select zero volume levels for the audio track you've faded out, after the fade-out, and zero volume for the track you're fading in, before the fade-in. Between those two techniques, of fading in & out, and the zeroing of volume for unwanted sections, you can smoothly flip back and forth between your two tracks. I know that's a very manual technique, but I came to digital editing straight from analogue tape, so it makes perfect sense to me, and it saves on razor blades & sticky tape. :-) 

To give you an example, I had one very memorable two-camera project (a live talk with two presenters and a small audience asking questions at some points) where, unbeknownst to me, the sound on the secondary camera had failed during filming, so I got nothing from the microphones that were positioned for the audience. In editing, when I was switching to the pictures from the secondary camera, I copied a section of the sound from the primary camera, boosting the volume because the microphones attached to that camera were in the wrong position for the audience, and fading the original primary camera sound out, while I faded up the boosted copy, and then back again the opposite way, when I returned to the primary camera pictures. There was obviously noticeable hiss in the boosted audio sections, which is why I wanted a smooth cross-fade, so that it wasn't an obvious jolt, and the whole thing worked quite well.

Hope that helps.



(Edited)
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robkellysound

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Hello,

Thank you for the time you put into that; that is indeed a work around and the way to go for more elaborate work, but the actual feature we need is the behaviour REAPER and Audition has when you simply push a clip into another clip, creating an automatic crossfade. It will also allow a clips start or end points to be overlapped with another audio clip, which would stop the video clip from moving with it. 

I work with tape too, but that work around is hellish in this software. Premiere has a middle ground where you can place a crossfade effect between two clips and that is actually pretty powerful. That would be the way to go with Camtasia.

All that inherently sorts out your 0 crossing points too. 
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Joe Morgan

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A cross fade intermingles the audio from both sources. 
Just like a video crossfade. The 2 images merge as 1.  
If you were to apply a long duration cross fade. You hear audio from the the first source when the playhead is positioned over the second source. 
Hence---Cross-Fade. 

Currently, you can accomplish this by overlapping the audio tracks. Fading out one while fading in the other.

 

This will throws the audio out of sync with the video.
Oh sure, you could jump through hoops to keep things in sync.
But with a true crossfade, you simply apply it.

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cbkr.team

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You're welcome Rob, and I see your point. Thanks also to Joe, for the graphical explanation.

While I wouldn't touch Adobe with a barge pole, both due to their distinctly unfriendly user interfaces, and their rip-off "rental" pricing plan, I am intrigued by your mention of Reaper. I've heard of it of course, but never seen it in action. I currently use Audacity for pure audio editing. How does Reaper compare, do you think? I'm happy to buy software outright when it's good, which having had a quick look just now, it seems like it is, and I respect them for their pricing policy too.

I've actually been considering DaVinci Resolve, which seems at first glance to have virtually everything you might want, in both video and audio, built into one package, though I haven't had time to check out the free version yet, to try before I buy as it were. I like that they give you a proper useable free version too, and you only buy the full-featured one if you need the extras. Similarly to Reaper, I respect them for that. Might I be better going for Resolve do you think? I don't know if Resolve has got a screen recorder though, so I'll at least keep Camtasia for that anyway, as it's a very useful function.

Like you, I still use tape too, even though I've got a 4-Track 24-bit digital recorder these days. There's just something about a giant reel-to-reel; it's visceral, like steam versus diesel. My two 10.5" reel Ferrograph recorders may be on their way to fifty years old, but they still look & sound great!

Anyway, sorry for all the chatter, but as you can no doubt tell, I'm a bit of an audio enthusiast. :-)

Marcus.
(Edited)
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sandeben

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Hey, I'm going to jump in here. Reaper is fantastic, and there are so many simple features from it that I would like to see in Camtasia, but I'm not sure how likely it is we'll see them. 

Reaper is in my opinion the best and most flexible audio software out there, but it isn't super user friendly at first - it's very customisable and could be a bit off putting at first if you aren't really into it.  When I work now, I do all my audio stuff in Reaper, then export it into Camtasia, which is lacking mixing features, any information on compression/limiting, anything like crossfades, etc, which is a real shame.
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paulwilliamengle

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I'm with Sandeben. I used Reaper at my last place of work, and I sent it up for voiceover narration, using Booth Junkie's workflow, articulated here: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLzEW-dm_vsRvfiH9RVKAJA6Vd2CccnVmn 
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robkellysound

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My background is an an audio professional and college lecturer, so I see software from two angles. One from what gets the job done to a good standard and what is easy to use for the target audience of Camtasia. Camtasia lets its target audience down, because it can very easily produce high quality material. I am fortunate to have the full Adobe suite, but I should not be forced into it by Camtasia.

REAPER is one of the best pieces of software for audio, but it is a steep learning curve.

Adobe, personal opinions aside, is well featured software but heavy going.

My issue with Camtasia is that I purchased it without thinking as much as I should have and now it is just acting as a screen recorder, and now I need to get the footage out of the software as soon as possible.

For me, the lack of a crossfade transition like Premiere has is nuts in software so expensive, and is a deal breaker when it comes to doing projects in Camtasia. 
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paulwilliamengle

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robkellysound, for the me, the lack of audio ducking like you can do in Adobe Premiere/Audio or Reaper can be really painful for the training video that I want to feature music. 
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robkellysound

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I am using Camtasia again for some work in the college and the lack of crossfading is sooooo annoying. Off to another VLE I go. Good heavens!