Audio degradation in Snagit 12

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I am transferring PowerPoint 2016 files to video with Snagit 12. This allows me to do timing and transitions on the fly with 1080p resolution. Here's the problem. The audio is significantly degraded from the original files (simple spoken word) which I edited. No problem that it's in mono, it just sounds grainy and sibilant compared to the original, and it never leaves the digital domain. I am capturing on the same computer I am producing on.. Windows 10, i7 laptop with 8 gigs/Ram, SSD drive, presonus audiobox audio interface.

I see no audio capture settings, do they exist?

Thanks in advance!

Missionrecording
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missionrecording

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Posted 4 years ago

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Timbre4, Champion

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Hello,

The primary mission for SnagIt is capturing images; video is a secondary function with the idea being to produce a shareable mp4 file quickly. The only control options I see are to select the audio input. You have quite a decent setup so that is not the issue. I suspect that your audio resolution (forum experts or TechSmith employees can verify) is MP3 quality mono at 64kbps to keep the file size down. Even if you were able to run the Presonus box @ 24/96 resolution, SnagIt audio would still be this same mp3 quality. Other replies may follow...

On rare occasions I've recorded PowerPoint shows with Camtasia but not SnagIt; since SnagIt only produces singular clips (no timeline or editing tools like Camtasia) I'm curious about how you can do "timing and transitions" on this platform if that was what you're saying?  

Not to be off topic but have you ever considered a workflow where you pre-record your narration to well-paced and then pantomime the slides to fit the narration? It's much easier and you have more controls over the results (if you go beyond SnagIt). Just my $.02


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missionrecording

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Thank you for your response Timbre4, these are industrial videos that are originally produced as PowerPoint presentations for teaching. I am taking audio that has been pre recorded and editing it in a "radio broadcast" style for the teaching. The last step is capturing the PowerPoint for re-presenting as short videos. I do all of my video editing in Sony Vegas. Some of the slides contain a lot of information and therefore need to sit on the screen longer after the audio for that slide has finished, thus the need for manual timing in the video capture. There are certainly other workflows that would work fine but Snagit seemed like the right way to grab it quickly for reproduction as an mp4. I honestly would never even try to use this program for editing video. For full screen capture of a PowerPoint it really works pretty well except for the audio.
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Timbre4, Champion

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Whew! Now we're on the same page. We use Vegas here for live action video and Camtasia for the desktop tutorial clips editing. I'd think you'd be further ahead to do that work in Vegas and output as mp4? You'd retain all of your audio quality/options.

Another way I've tackled PowerPoint shows is to use SnagIt to capture high quality stills of each slide (no animations present) and then import to Clip Bin in Camtasia (or similarly to Media Bin in Vegas). Put them on the timeline and then drag them out to match the narration. Add transitions, heat and serve. 

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missionrecording

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Yes sir! I have considered all of these possibilities. But in the situation I'm in, for the client I serve, the fastest way would be to play and capture the powerpoint, trim heads and tails, and serve up the mp4. Since I don't build the powerpoint (the client does) and since they spend a lot of time on their transitions and animations it would be much easier to just capture it than to reproduce it. My best option maybe using Pluraleyes ( a great little plugin for audio alignment) to resync the original edited audio to the capture from Snagit. Kind of a pain considering the audio capture should actually be pretty easy for Snagit, but better than trying to recreate this other stuff. Thank you so much for your time and energies!