Audio editing buttons MOVE TO TOOLBAR PLEASE!

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  • Updated 4 years ago

I'm really frustrated! The tool is designed for editing video's and sound comes with video's, however I don't find the location of the editing tools conducive to editing. Trying to remove the sniglets (mouth sounds, breath, and other yuckies), is painful. First, you adjust the height of the tracks, making sure you add tracks above and below since tracks clip other tracks obscuring the view small sniglets at the bottom of the track, then you close the markers view because, well that scrunches the tracks. Adding the extra tracks above and below does help though.

Then you select reduce the size of the main viewing panel and select audio, adjust the audio viewing panel so you can just click on the silence button (SINCE THERE'S NO HOT KEY FOR IT). Then you click on your track and the audio editing tools panel shifts to where you have to re-adjust the screen in order to access the SILENCE BUTTON!

This wonderful dance continues until you finally decide that the aggravation of seeing the video,  in the size you want as you edit really isn't worth the extra time to scroll the box down enough so you can select the button, each time you want to remove a sniglet.

This could be remedied by moving the volume down, volume up, fade in, fade out, silence, add audio point, and remove audio points next to the cut buttons on the timeline toolbar. Why you could even add play, rewind, plus 5, 10, 15, 30 second increments with + and - buttons that toggles direction on the same bar. In fact there's even room to add a toggle select button so no matter which direction you move the time bar it selects. So if you click the plus 5 seconds it selects 5 seconds based on current direction. ( the selected + or - button ).

I hope I'm not asking for too much since my frustration level is at an all time high (Yeah, I'm one of those people ;-).

Would it be too much to ask?  When the left arrow key with the shift key is depressed that the whole blasted tracks don't re-adjust? When the shift key is selected to highlight one of those MORE annoying sniglets you just passed on the time line, occasionally, the tracks re-adjust when you stop and go to highlight it.  Of course I have only to blame myself for the pervasive annoying sniglet sounds strewed across my video. You can be sure I wrote a most UNPLEASANT letter of recommendation to myself well before sending this note to you. I'm just hoping that I will get a much better response from you and I will ever get from myself.

I am really annoyed with myself at this time so I could be overly sensitive in regards to the buttons.

Thank you for letting me vent. I really needed to get that off my chest. Please excuse me as I continue to hunt sniglets.


PS. All the sniglets have been edited out of this post. 8^)

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boliver

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  • Silly, amused, frustrated, sad, and snigletty!

Posted 4 years ago

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Timbre4, Champion

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Much as I love Camtasia, it leaves a lot to be desired for audio editing. This is why I produce the audio from a script FIRST, then record my screens to the audio playing in my SoundForge program. If you attend a production boot camp or similar, they will offer much the same advice. Get the audio right first then shoot screens, much less stressful and more productive.
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Sharyn

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Hi Timbre4, If you record audio first, how do you know how fast/ slow to speak so that it can be matched to your mouse clicks and when screens appear?
Sounds hard......
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Timbre4, Champion

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Hi Sharyn, actually it's much simpler in terms of getting great results.

The narration never sounds rushed and there are no awkward pauses; people don't always sound confident and relaxed if they are trying to fiddle with buttons at the same time. So take that out of the production equation. I've been a subject matter expert for a software program for quite a while and have produced hundreds of videos in that time. The key think is getting the narration correct FIRST; everything else then falls into place and the final product is that much better.

1. Write your script while in the portion of the application to be discussed. That way the flow (screens, clicks, etc.) makes sense right away and there are no surprises that must be re-worked.

2. Record your script, re-doing any phrases that don't sound right in your head, you'll edit these out later. From experience with the application you have a good idea where pauses should be. (this can be further tweaked in CS if need be.)

3. Edit the audio WAV recording until you are satisfied you have the take to use. Save that file for production. (record the highest quality, CS will encode final version)

4. When it's time, open that file in it's program (Sound Forge in my case). I use a saved 7 second silence in front of the file for a countdown to sync with Camtasia screen recording startup.

5. I start the audio playing... start Camtasia screen recorder and simply move the mouse or keys to match what I'm discussing in the audio file. When it's done, I move to the CS timeline and line things up. It's very close and usually where I want it to be.

To make changes to the audio timing, I may use the Cut (scissors) to move a section to "sooner" or just a tad "later" if I feel that it improves the overall impact.

In summary, the audio is usually the hardest thing to get right. Once you're happy with that, it's just a matter of playing with the visuals until that feels right.

Tim (timbre4)

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boliver

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Timbre, I'm playing with audacity as you suggested. If I understand your recording procedure you record in sound forge and play your recording back while recording in CS? Is that correct?
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Timbre4, Champion

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Yes, that's how I do it. Get the audio right and pantomime the screen actions to match. For recording, you'll need to insert some silence (7 seconds) so that you have time to a) click your audio file to play, then b) start Camtasia recording with it's countdown. If you have two monitors, put your audio program on the other screen. If not, then Alt-tab to Camtasia or click it from the task bar quickly if you can.

This was a little nerve-wracking when I only used 3-4 seconds countdown, but 7 seconds seems just right. (not saving the silence with audio file so why not?)

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boliver

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I really appreciate all your advise. Thank you!

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boliver

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Timbre, I can see why you say record sound outside of CS and marry the two, it's a hell of a lot easier. I also found a free VST filter for my esses, from digitalfishphones.com, that works with audacity. Many thanks for that! I'm curious though as to the quality of sound from your recordings when you play from sound forge and record on CS? I figured out I had to turn off my mic's but I still get a slightly distorted sound, which I think comes from filtering in audacity? Would you have any suggestions? I don't get the distortion as much when I import a wav file but then I have the engagement to deal with. I've also tried separating the video and sound, exporting the  sound, washing it through audacity and reimporting. That has issues too but so far no good deed goes unpunished. LOL I'll give it another day of fiddling maybe I just need to filter it a tad less or more. Thanks!

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Timbre4, Champion

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Internal microphones only get you so far and there simply aren't many options while using them. If you have a good signal chain you shouldn't have to spend time processing it to make it good. I'll back up and explain the setup a bit more.

 I use a good AKG medium diaphragm microphone ($200) through an ART preamp ($30) into a Windows 7 Ultimate PC. The weighted desktop mic stand ($30) has a small windscreen ($9) between me and the mic that serve to minimize the esses and plosives so I don't have to fix them.

I record into SONY Sound Forge Pro 10 as a 44K mono WAV file. I've found the most efficient process is to keep recording through flubs, alternates and then edit afterwards. The noise floor is usually very good; I still use a -30 noise preset to scrub any random noise that's 30dB below my voice. Takes about 10 seconds to run, depending on file size.

While I may use a little compression and normalization (volume correction) in certain instances, I try to stay away from that as too much compression creates listener fatigue and sounds unnatural.

I keep the original WAV files as there may be a need to change the narration next year by a word or two. Then I just record the needed phrase and splice it into the existing WAV and then reprocess the video clip as usual. Saves time.


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boliver

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Thanks Timbre, I'm new to the whole video production process, in fact I dove in without ever doing proper research on how to develop a video presentation. I certainly didn't expect to find myself in the mist of a full blow technical production odyssey that I seemed to have naturally meandered into, do to my naivety, when I started.   If I somehow survive my ordeal I will most certainly look into SoundForge. Thank you for your kind advise!
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Timbre4, Champion

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You might also look into Audacity - it's free and a lot of folks here seem to use it.
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Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

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Hi,
Most people who make a lot of training videos record their voice separately from their screen recording.
This is the process we use at TechSmith.
You can use Audacity to record your script, or, the Voice Narration tool inside Camtasia Studio.

I hope this process works out for you!
Kelly
User Assistance
TechSmith
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boliver

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Hi Kelly, I've been pursuing the external recording, but only just started, as a means to address my esses. So far each of the three options I have, 1. record exclusively in CS and spend three to four hours per 20mins of recording, 2. Record in audacity and play back in CS, then deal with the distortion, 3. Split video and sound and import a cleaner copy and deal with the marriage. Each has their issues and at this point I'm not sure which is the best route. I am open to ideas though.
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Joe Morgan

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Hello there,

This is the workflow I use for recording audio in Camtasia. This is also the easiest way I've found to synchronize my voice to my video.

1. I record my screen while recording my voice using the Camtasia recorder.

2. In the Camtasia editor I do any necessary voiceovers there.

 3. I export the audio as a.WAV file and clean up my audio in Adobe audition.

There is one very important step when editing audio for Camtasia studio. Export the audio as a.WAV file. Use a sample rate of 44,100 HZ at 16 bits.

I get excellent results using this technique. I hope this helps you out.

Regards, Joe

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