blurring a video

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  • Updated 2 years ago
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Right now I have  a free version of Camtasia. I need to blur sensitive information ( bank accounts and passwords) in a video but can't find how to do this. Is there someone who can help me out?


Thanks in advance.


Kind Regards,


Victor Noordewind

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Victor

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Posted 2 years ago

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Rick Stone

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By "free version" I'm guessing you are using the time limited and watermarked evaluation version? ;)

Look at the Annotations. Specifically, the Blur or the Pixellate.



Cheers... Rick :)
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Victor

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Thanks Rick for your reply. In  the meantime I found out how it works.... but thanks anyway. yes you are right theis is the watermarked version but I'm thinking about buying the commerciual one.

One other question. My (screen) recordings are not very sharp..... I read somewere that the best screen resolution is  1024 x 768 but even than t is not very sharp. Any ideas how to improve this?

Thanks in advance.

Kind regards,

Victor
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selfg

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I'm not sure what may be causing your videos to not be sharp. Mine are fine. Your problem may be the video camera that you are using. Try just recording the screen without a video feed and see if that is sharp. If so, then you need to find a better camera or set it up differently.

One other important consideration is what you are going to do with the finished video. If you are posting on YouTube, for example, they have a recommended resolution and aspect ratio (see: https://support.google.com/youtube/an...). I know that I used to record in 1024X768 but switched to 720P (1280X720) about two years ago so my videos would display properly on YouTube.

Good luck with your video project.
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Rick Stone

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The "Best" resolution is always determined by your intended audience. ;)

Note that 1024 x 768 is an older 4x3 aspect ratio. (4 units across by 3 units tall) We used to see that a lot with older computers and Televisions before they all went on a diet and got all skinny and all.

Newer resolutions are in a 16x9 aspect ratio. (16 units across by 9 units tall)

If you play a 4x3 video on a 16x9 setup. For example, if you uploaded that 1024 x 768 video to YouTube, you end up with "pillarboxing" during playback.



As far as I'm aware, pretty much everything is now being created in a 16x9 aspect ratio. And there are primarily two resolutions for these. One is called 720p and the other is 1080p. With 720p, your recording and/or playback area is 1080 pixels wide by 720 pixels tall. And with 1080p, this area is 1920 pixels wide by 1080 pixels tall. My own preference seems to be 1080p.

Note that there are even larger standards. We are now hearing about "4k" and I've seen references to "8k".

Just note that the larger the number of pixels, the clearer the picture.

As far as your videos and their sharpness, for one thing that's kind of a subjective thing, but it all has to do with the resolution you recorded, VS the resolution you produced, VS the resolution of the playback device.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Joe Morgan

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The best resolution choice is simple.

You always want to record and edit your videos at the same resolution.

Any deviation from that will induce blurring in the final Produced video.

Regards,Joe

 
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ExpertNovice

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If you feel you must change the resolution then use the same Aspect Ratio which can be calculated with this Excel formula.

  • Cell        Entry
  • A1          width (e.g. 1024)
  • B1          height (e.g. 768)
  • C1          =A1/GCD(A1,B1)&"x"&B1/GCD(A1,B1)

Results look like     1024    768    4x3

Just in case Excel 2007 or greater is not available "GCD" is Greatest Common Divisor or Greatest Common Denominator and is not hard to calculate.