Callouts with the ability to have Transparent Background with Opaque Text

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I have always wanted to make the background of a callout transparent while keeping the text opaque for readability.  I never suggested it, though since the old Glassy option allowed items behind the callout to show through.  Even if the Glassy option is brought back (And as a note, I will stick with an older version of SnagIt for now for this) it would be nice to be able to control the transparency of the shape and text separately.
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ksumwalt

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Posted 10 months ago

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Rick Stone

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Indeed, one of the frustrations I see with things like this is the spontaneous and unexplained disappearance of assets such as glassy callouts. My view is that whatever once existed should persist with newer versions. Or at least always be made available in an archive should folks need them.

If I give you a penny for your thoughts and you give me your two cents worth, what happens to the other penny?

Happy Tuesday... Rick :)
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jasons

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I'm using 2018 and the fill for the callouts have a transparent option if that’s what you mean.
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Paul

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I'm not saying I agree with it, but the issue here is fashion trends.  A few years ago it was all about glossy effects and gradient fills, now it's all about flat effects.

Why we can't have both is beyond me. But when TechSmith reengineered the product they clearly decided on a minimum viable product and therefore discarded a lot of requirements.  It takes a certain amount of chutzpah to make a splash about bringing back text grab when it shouldn't have been removed in the first place.

So your problem is caused by the fact that opacity applies to the whole image not just the background.  That should be an easy fix shouldn't it?  Checkbox that says "Exclude text", next to the opacity slider?

But I have to ask, why are you putting red and green together?  5% of the population suffer from red/green colour blindness.  Or are these just for your personal use?

Cheers

Paul
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ksumwalt

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Red and green were just the first two colors that popped into my head while typing the example.  With the old Glassy capability I used Red text with a stock Blue callout and when I wanted to differentiate maybe the text on a button I would use a dark blue for that part of the callout and red for the narrative.  I admittedly do not know how any of these look for colorblind individuals, I just got use to them from when they were first made available.  As for why red and green popped in there in the first place?  I don't know.  Will have to go get a therapist's session to answer that one...

Regarding fashion trends:  So we should follow?  Why can't we set the trend instead?
(Edited)
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Paul

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It seems pretty damn obvious to me that a tool that generates the objects has to be ready for ANY trend before it strikes.
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Rick Stone

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I dunno Paul, here's my own personal take on things like the text grab.

TechSmith advised us that it was changes in the operating system that caused that to be removed. And that sounds perfectly plausible to me. I mean, I cannot fathom what it takes or is like to be a developer for Windows things. I can imagine it would be very frustrating to constantly wrestle with their code changes that likely break things you depend on.

What I notice with the text grab re-introduction is that they are now no longer coding it themselves, but are instead using this ABBYY text application.

I see that as being very much like auto manufacturers and things such as air bags. Instead of having to do all it takes to manufacture air bags, you simply avoid that entirely and just purchase the technology elsewhere.

As for the "fashion trends", I see where the whole "monkey mind" comes into play.

Ohhhhh, somebody created glossy stuff. Let's copy that! Then ohhhhhh, the same somebody (who is now somehow deemed to be an authority on whatever design aspect) is doing THIS. So, like monkeys chasing a leader, everybody mindlessly heads the new direction, lest the FOMO. (Fear Of Missing Out)

I saw the same mentality when I was in the corporate world, working in Tech Support. We had one guy that was fairly astute in his technical capability that others would go ask questions when they were having trouble solving the tech support calls they were working on. And one day someone at their wits end with a call asked this "guru" what could possibly be the case. The guy said it was a real long shot, but to maybe check to see if their file system was FAT 16 or FAT 32. Note that this was an unlikely scenario and kind of a "hail mary" (not sure what that is, I'm not into sports at all, but I think it may apply to sporting as a "I give up, let's try this" kind of thing.)

And the strangest thing happened. For about the next two weeks, as you walked past cubicles and heard others on the phone with customers, EVERYONE seemed to be intent on checking whether the file system was FAT 16 or FAT 32. And most of these folks had no clue what it even was. But you know, the guru said it! Soooooo

The issue with removing the older trend is that perhaps that's exactly what someone settled on as their own preferred design standard. Now a new version comes along and BOOM! The rug has been yanked from under them. Not a pleasant experience!

Anyhoo, those are my long winded thoughts... Rick :)
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craigfender

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Considering my operating system didn't change while my software did I say this is a feature they can bring back and should.  This sort of change makes me very leery of upgrading again.