Camtasia 2018 Audio Noise Problem

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I'm importing .mp4 files (WebEx recordings) in my newly-purchased Camtasia 2018, and hearing a crackling noise throughout the recording. It sounds like the presenter is talking on a land line phone that has a bad connection. Noise Removal in Camtasia is not eliminating the noise.

When I play the unedited source file through a media player, there is no crackling sound.
Is Camtasia performing some automatic amplification, and bringing out this noise?
Or, Is my VLC media player performing some automatic noise cancelling when I play back the original source file? If the latter, why isn't Camtasia performing this?

I will add that that I haven't experienced this phenomenon in almost 3 years of editing WebEx recordings using Camtasia 8.

Is there a preferred bit rate for importing mp4 files into Camtasia 2018?
I can run my raw files through Handbrake before importing into Camtasia

I'd prefer to not have to switch between Camtasia and Audacity to correct this issue every time I edit a webinar.
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bdeviller

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Posted 1 week ago

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Dubie

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Don't know what the WebEx is putting out but Camtasia works best with
44100 Hz
16 bit .wav

Dubie
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(Edited)
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Dubie

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bdeviller

You mention Audacity which I use all the time. a lot of time I just record my audio in Audacity and then bring it into Camtasia. Saves a bunch of steps.

That said I also have a decent audio setup and most of the time when I record just in Camtasia the audio is good.

To the point... something you may not know is that you can drag and drop your .trec file onto Audacity and it will extract the audio and put it on a timeline ready for editing.
Then you can just bring it into Camtasia and replace the recorded audio.

Then you don't have to export it from Camtasia first.

I don't have a fix for your problem as it could any number of things but if you do have to
re-encode your audio the above is a quick way to get it done.

Dubie
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(Edited)
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Dustin Smith

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that's very cool... thanks a lot for that tip
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bdeviller

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Thanks.
There is no .trec file. The source file is a .mp4 download from WebEx.

I could use Camtasia to record the screen being used by our webinar facilitators. But, whereas our webinars are 60 and 90 minutes in length, and often involve presenting video files, I worry about recording file size, and the strain on the PC's resources.
A live webinar that crashes in real time will be a bigger problem than low quality audio.
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Dustin Smith

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I bring MP4 recordings into camtasia 9 all the time  (for me mostly join.me web meeting recordings) and they work fine. If the MP4 audio is junk for you it is probably an encoding issue with the webex audio. I think you could, in Camtasia, separate the audio and video tracks, export out the audio track and convert it to WAV, then bring it back in again... that's a pain but it may be all you have.
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Clint Hoagland, Employee

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Hi bdeviller,

If you contact our support folks at https://support.techsmith.com/hc/en-us and get those files to us we may be able to figure out what's going on with them and make Camtasia work better with them going forward.  The Audacity workaround is probably your best bet in the short term but if we are aware of files that work well in prior versions we want to make them work as well or better in current and future versions of Camtasia.

(As you can probably imagine there are a lot of variations on audio and video file formats out there.)

Thank you,
Clint Hoagland
Software Test Lead, Camtasia
TechSmith Corporation
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Robert R., Online Community Admin

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Hi Bruce;
As Clint mentioned you may want to open a support ticket, but I thought I'd hop in here for a public reply on the issues you are likely running into. It's been my experience that WebEx-generated video files use an extremely low frequency, generally 8 kHz. My understanding is that it is due to needing to merge (on their end) the telephony audio and the VOIP audio; the recommendation we have in Support is to use a tool like HandBrake to transcode the file, which should convert that audio from 8 kHz to a more manageable 44.1 kHz (or similar) which should then allow it to work out in Camtasia with little, if any, degredation.
-Robert
P.s. I still recommend opening a support ticket.
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bdeviller

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Converting to 44.1 seems to be working well. It cleans up most of the crackling. And, the remaining little clicks and ticks are less noticeable when I reduce the Gain by 10 or 15%.
I will make sure we aren't recording from a microphone that is too hot.
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bdeviller

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Thank you for all the replies. I opened a ticket. I will also try some of the suggested fixes. I do have Handbrake, and will see if converting to 44.1 helps.
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Dustin Smith

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I have a more general question... we do a weekly partner update web session using Join.me, which also delivers an MP4 file.  I generally don't bother to edit these at all; I just upload them to my screencast site and send the link to the partners who want to review it.  I was a bit curious as to why you need to put it through a camtasia process... is it just to pretty it up a little?

And I think you mentioned using handbreak, which I used to use back when the audio delivered in join.me was not properly encoded.  It should render the audio track you bring into camtasia usable.
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bdeviller

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Our webinars are structured training sessions. Before we make the recordings available as on-demand products we complete post-production steps to enhance the educational effectiveness of the event.
Much of it addresses students' attention spans and how people learn. But, file size is part of it, too.  
 - To provide content in smaller bites (Three 20-minute modules rather than one 60-minute module, for example)
 - To edit out content that is irrelevant to the students completing the on-demand version, including  "housekeeping" details, long pauses when students are contemplating their responses, and technical glitches that sometimes occur
 - To add enhancements such as annotations, call-outs, zooms, quiz questions, replacing video clips that were degraded by WebEx, etc.
 - To package the modules in a SCORM wrapper so they function in our learning management system, and we can track completions. 
And, yes, it looks a little nicer, too.
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Dustin Smith

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that helps... i actually do a version of the same thing with our web sessions so I can repurpose the content for end users. I'm pretty sure running your MP4 through Handbrake with the right settings will encode the audio sufficiently so everything behaves in Camtasia
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bdeviller

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thanks