camtasia 9 won't play MTS file

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I can import the MTS file and add it to the timeline, but it won't play correctly.  The audio is fine, but the visual component remains frozen with occasional jitters as if its trying to catch up.  This seems to be a new issue because I did NOT have this issue with MTS files the last time I used Cam 9 (probably almost a year ago).
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MICHAEL D PANASCI

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Posted 1 month ago

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dmey503

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Can you play the video using other software on your computer? Also, what version of Windows are you using? If you're using Windows 7 or 8, you need an AC-3 filter (see this article). 

It sounds like there's an issue with the codec used for this file--it isn't necessarily an issue with the MTS format. I've had this issue with different file formats and Camtasia and I have to run them through Adobe Media Encoder and convert them to MP4s. 

Adobe Media Encoder has a ton of formats and options and usually comes free with any Adobe software. You can also download a trial if you don't already have it or look online for a free file converter. 
(Edited)
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Muscle Whisperer

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Ah, so it was YOU who was standing in line in front of me in 1968, having typed our assembler language onto a stack of punch cards in order to feed it into the university's only computer. Or graduating to Fortran IV. Lots of people here don't remember when floppy discs weren't 31⁄2" encased in plastic, but 128 KB in a paper sleeve. It's funny how we still use the icon for a floppy disk when we want to save files!
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Rick Stone

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cbkr.team - My first home computer in 1983 had no drive, had 48K RAM, and you loaded programs from audio cassette tapes!

Sounds similar to my own beginner experience! Mine was a Commodore 64 and used a television set as the monitor. I used to marvel at how small it was, knowing that early computers were so large they required an entire room to house them!
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cbkr.team

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Not quite 1968, Muscle Whisperer - LOL - but yes it is funny that we still use the floppy disc symbol, isn't it! It's like the speed camera warning signs here in the UK, where the sign is a silhouette of a 1930s roll film camera. If it wasn't for having to pass a driving test, I doubt that the young would have a clue what it was!

Funny you should mention punch cards, as when I started work, the first computer system I used was a VAX/VMS system that had replaced the old punch card system a few years before. They'd previously had tied lines to another site, with an IBM 360 mainframe in it and, as you say, it had been the sole computer for the whole company. I also remember one system they still had which used 8" floppy discs - the only time I've ever seen them.

We have more computing power in our pockets these days! :-)
(Edited)
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cbkr.team

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I remember the Commodore 64, Rick, but I went for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. It was even smaller than the Commodore, and had a cool rubber keyboard, with BASIC keywords programmed against every key, so you didn't have to really type much to get a whole line of programming. It used the TV set too, so I only got to use it when nobody was watching television. :-)

Sinclair ZX Spectrum Issue 2 Computer
(Edited)
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MICHAEL D PANASCI

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Yes, the file plays fine in Windows Media Player.  Running Windows 10. 
I realize I'm being a little lazy here and not checking myself, but can Adobe Media Encoder do batch transfers?  Or is it 1 file at a time?  How about the others for Windows?