camtasia 9 won't play MTS file

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I can import the MTS file and add it to the timeline, but it won't play correctly.  The audio is fine, but the visual component remains frozen with occasional jitters as if its trying to catch up.  This seems to be a new issue because I did NOT have this issue with MTS files the last time I used Cam 9 (probably almost a year ago).
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MICHAEL D PANASCI

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Posted 2 months ago

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dmey503

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Can you play the video using other software on your computer? Also, what version of Windows are you using? If you're using Windows 7 or 8, you need an AC-3 filter (see this article). 

It sounds like there's an issue with the codec used for this file--it isn't necessarily an issue with the MTS format. I've had this issue with different file formats and Camtasia and I have to run them through Adobe Media Encoder and convert them to MP4s. 

Adobe Media Encoder has a ton of formats and options and usually comes free with any Adobe software. You can also download a trial if you don't already have it or look online for a free file converter. 
(Edited)
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Muscle Whisperer

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dmey503 - you got it right.
We've discussed this on another thread about a month ago.
Camtasia has a difficult time with the MTS container, probably because it hasn't done a good enough job with codecs for the H.264 stream.
When I asked Tech support, they recommended recording at a lower resolution (not 1080p or HD), or converting your files to mp4.
I've been having this problem on and off with my MTS files for three years, so it's not the newer updates.
I had horrendous new problems with the latest update from last week (19.0.7), but most glitches cleared up after uninstalling and reinstalling the software.

Fix 1: Uninstall and reinstall Camtasia to newest version (or perhaps 19.0.6 - it was more stable)
Fix 2: Add a step to your work and convert your MTS files to mp4 via 3rd party software.
Fix 3: Take your computer, lift it up 6" from the table surface, hold it there for 3.4 seconds and then let it drop. Whether it's on or off at the time is up to you. It used to work for my Atari business computer in 1986, back when the OS was firmware on a chip and hard disk drives hadn't been invented yet (my first HDD was a whopping 5MB capacity - nobody needed more memory than that, surely!).
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dmey503

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I always film in MP4 because it's the most compatible format and often run files through Adobe Media Encoder at some point to reduce it from 100 mpbs to around 35-40. I would recommend anyone doing video editing or design install Adobe Media Encoder or a similar application that can convert media file types. 

haha the best fixes I've ever discovered: 1. hit the computer. 2. Turn it off and leave it alone for three days. 3. Ask someone to look over your shoulder and help you--the problem always disappears.

Ahhh I still remember how excited my brother and I were when our parents bought a "state of the art" 386 that had an ENTIRE MEGABYTE of memory. 
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cbkr.team

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Yep, I just convert everything to MP4, because it makes life so much easier. There are a number of good free conversion programs out there. I've got several, both for Windows and for Mac.

A 5MB hard drive? 1MB RAM? My first home computer in 1983 had no drive, had 48K RAM, and you loaded programs from audio cassette tapes! I then added a six-year-old second-hand PC for small business use, in 1986. It ran on CP/M (Control Program/Monitor), which was the competitor to DOS. That PC had a whopping 64K RAM, with twin 256K 5.25" floppy disc drives, and green screen, with no graphics to speak of! You guys didn't know you were born. :-) 

What really tickles me though, is that people grumble about the prices of Macs and high-end PCs, but that CP/M PC cost £4,000 when it was new in 1980, which would buy you about four or five top-of-the-line MacBook Pros in today's money! :-)
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Muscle Whisperer

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Ah, so it was YOU who was standing in line in front of me in 1968, having typed our assembler language onto a stack of punch cards in order to feed it into the university's only computer. Or graduating to Fortran IV. Lots of people here don't remember when floppy discs weren't 31⁄2" encased in plastic, but 128 KB in a paper sleeve. It's funny how we still use the icon for a floppy disk when we want to save files!
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Rick Stone

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cbkr.team - My first home computer in 1983 had no drive, had 48K RAM, and you loaded programs from audio cassette tapes!

Sounds similar to my own beginner experience! Mine was a Commodore 64 and used a television set as the monitor. I used to marvel at how small it was, knowing that early computers were so large they required an entire room to house them!
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cbkr.team

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Not quite 1968, Muscle Whisperer - LOL - but yes it is funny that we still use the floppy disc symbol, isn't it! It's like the speed camera warning signs here in the UK, where the sign is a silhouette of a 1930s roll film camera. If it wasn't for having to pass a driving test, I doubt that the young would have a clue what it was!

Funny you should mention punch cards, as when I started work, the first computer system I used was a VAX/VMS system that had replaced the old punch card system a few years before. They'd previously had tied lines to another site, with an IBM 360 mainframe in it and, as you say, it had been the sole computer for the whole company. I also remember one system they still had which used 8" floppy discs - the only time I've ever seen them.

We have more computing power in our pockets these days! :-)
(Edited)
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cbkr.team

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I remember the Commodore 64, Rick, but I went for the Sinclair ZX Spectrum. It was even smaller than the Commodore, and had a cool rubber keyboard, with BASIC keywords programmed against every key, so you didn't have to really type much to get a whole line of programming. It used the TV set too, so I only got to use it when nobody was watching television. :-)

Sinclair ZX Spectrum Issue 2 Computer
(Edited)
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MICHAEL D PANASCI

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Yes, the file plays fine in Windows Media Player.  Running Windows 10. 
I realize I'm being a little lazy here and not checking myself, but can Adobe Media Encoder do batch transfers?  Or is it 1 file at a time?  How about the others for Windows?
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Geoff Bishop

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Same Issue.  Please fix.
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Muscle Whisperer

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Dear Geoff,
This is a user forum (sometimes with answers from actual TechSmith staff).
You may get suggestions here, but most of us are just muddling through, sharing our thoughts.
Please carefully re-read the thread because it contains stuff you should know about Camtasia.
MTS format is high-definition video.
Camtasia works more smoothly (most of the time) with lower definition.
If you don't need HD or 4K video output, you would be better off using a separate program to convert your mts file to mp4 (lower resolution) and then work with it. Try Handbrake - it's a great tool.
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Geoff Bishop

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You are a gentleman and a scholar, Sir.  I was in fact able to use "Handbrake" (with it's default settings) to export my MTS file to an MP4 which Camtasia was able to handle.