Camtasia and H.264 License for Commercial use.

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Hello, I would be very grateful for your advice. I would like to create a commercial online educational course using Camtasia. But while reading the Microsoft Windows 10 Software License Terms, I found Section 13.b Additional Notices:  H.264/AVC and MPEG-4 visual standards and VC-1 video standards.  This implies that it is necessary to pay Royalties/Licence fees for using the H.264/MPEG4 software to create commercial video?

I may have misunderstood this. But would appreciate your advice on this please.
Thanks very much.
Fraser
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fraser.hatfield

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Posted 8 months ago

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Rick Stone

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Hi there

If this is a requirement, it would be the first I've ever heard of it. There are a great many pieces of software that allow outputting H.264. One would think that if this were a requirement that TechSmith would be posting major warnings about it if you produced videos. Or it's possible that as part of offering something like Camtasia and SnagIt videos, TechSmith has already paid whatever costs there may be and has factored this into the purchase price of the software.

Then again, I'm no lawyer, so there's that. 

Perhaps an actual TechSmith rep will chime in here to either confirm or deny my thoughts.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Bob Lewis

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My understanding is that if you own a legal copy of Camtasia
( In which TechSmith has the legal rights to use the codecs.)
then you can produce professional commercial videos.
(Edited)
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rg

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This is my understanding, and I could be wrong, but here goes:  The patent holders for H.264 are a group called MPEG LA (which I think may still include both Apple and Microsoft, and which is not the same as the actual non-profit MPEG "Moving Picture Experts Group").  The patent holders may impose payment requirements on two sources:  (1) anyone who makes a product that actually encodes video using this standard; and, (2) distributors of content using this standard, if the content is not provided for free.  License fees quoted in 2015 ranged from $0 to $5 million -- but again, they may not necessarily apply unless you are (for example) the distributor Comcast charging subscribers for video, or unless you are a company that makes a video encoding product.  Regardless, I strongly recommend that you consult an Intellectual Property attorney with expertise in media and software licensing, rather than relying on a forum thread or researching this on the internet.
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Glenn Hoeppner, Employee

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Camtasia does not currently use Windows libraries for its video encoding. Any encoding costs for content produced by Camtasia are covered by the cost of Camtasia.

The agreement you're reading is for Windows encoders, not Camtasia's encoders.

I hope this helps,
Glenn
(Edited)
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fraser.hatfield

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Hello, I would like to thank everyone for taking the time to reply to my question.
All of your advice has been very helpful and informative.

Thanks very much.
Fraser