Camtasia Optimization For Ryzen 7?

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  • Updated 5 months ago
STORY TIME
So, I'm a small gaming YouTuber and I make videos for fun. However, I recently decided to up my game and switch from an Intel Core i7 6700 pre-built system to building my own Ryzen 7 1700 system. I overclocked the 8 core, 16 thread processor to 3.7 GHz on the stock cooler. I have 16 GB of RAM clocked at 2666 MHz (upgrading to 32 GB soon) and an RX 480 for light gaming and video rendering.

ISSUE AT HAND
However, I noticed while I was rendering my 20 minute 1080p video that the Ryzen 7 1700 seemed to render just as fast, if not, slower than my i7 6700. I then realized that the processor was only at 20-45% utilization at any given time and never seemed to exceed 60%.

I even set the priority of Camtasia 8 to "Realtime" in Task Manager, and still no improvement.

RAISING THE QUESTION
So, is there any sort of planned optimization for the Ryzen processors anytime soon? I'd love to be able to render videos with my processor's full potential. The only upside to the processor being 50% utilized is being able to do loads of background tasks without an issue, but I'd still like to have the faster rendering times and have my processor utilized completely.
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Brendan Chalk

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  • slightly underwhelmed

Posted 2 years ago

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Rick Stone

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Camtasia 8 is 32 bit. Camtasia 9 is 64 bit.

You would do well to download Camtasia 9 and give it a test drive to see what improvements you notice.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Brendan Chalk

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Did I write Camtasia 8? Oops. I actually am running Camtasia 9 & not 8. Thank you for the suggestion, though. :)
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Joe Morgan

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TechSmith can't fix this.
This is actually a  AMD compatibility problem.

 AMD has never "Interrogated Well" with video editing programs. I don't know what their problem is. Although,  AMD has improved over the years.

Here's a recent excerpt from Tom's Hardware. http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-5-1600x-cpu-review,5014.html

AMD began its assault on the high-end desktop with Ryzen 7. And while the 7-series introduced disruptive pricing and impressive performance to heavily threaded workstation apps (especially compared to Intel's Broadwell-E-based Core i7s), its 8C/16T configuration isn't fully utilized by most mainstream software, including games. Lower than expected frame rates, especially at lower resolutions, had many in the technology press wondering where the architecture was coming up short.

To be honest, this doesn't surprise me a bit. Intel  produces the best processors for video editing.

One day, AMD may get there act together.

Regards,Joe
(Edited)
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Brendan Chalk

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Wow, that really is a shame. Such a great processor not expressing it's full potential. Well, I guess you get what you pay for. Hopefully they'll get their act together, because although Intel does make pretty good processors, I just don't want to pay over three times as much as I paid for this one and get similar performance in most applications. :/
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Neal Bailey

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Meanwhile, Adobe's video rendering software does fully utilize multi-core architectures properly. I have an 8700K @ 5.2Ghz (6 core) and yea I'm getting 15% utilization) which is just pathetic. Premier Pro takes like 2 minutes to render an 8 minute video where Camtasia takes like 20 minutes. Its a lot more expensive but I recommend switching to professional video editing software because Camtasia is clearly only for amateurs and hobbyists who have potato hardware and don't care about the time it takes to render.
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borg

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It's not AMD fault that some software vendors do not optimize CPUs for multi core, and if software which is intended for video editing does not optimize for multicore it is oxymorone to think it's CPU fault. If you check hundreds of benchmarks on the net for various software you will see you actually DON'T get what you pay for with Intel. You get 2-5% improvement in some software and 2-5% less performance in other for 2-3X times the price. As mentioned above all current serious software for video editing fully supports all cores of all CPUs.