Camtasia 8 noise removal is adding hum

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  • Updated 1 year ago
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I've been using Camtasia 7 (and evaluating 8) with a Logitech analog headset. Noise removal has worked well in 7, but less so in 8 (this experience parallels another thread I saw recently).

I just purchased a Microsoft LX-3000 headset with noise-canceling mic. When I apply noise removal in Camtasia 8, it causes a strong background hum regardless of the sensitivity (-6 to +6). I tested this "double" noise removal in version 7 and the result is excellent, even compared to the raw output from the noise canceling mic.

I'd like to take advantage of the features in 8, but maintain the audio clarity I can obtain in 7. Any ideas how to eliminate the hum in 8?
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Nick Moffitt

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Posted 4 years ago

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Randy Schott

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Hi Nick,

I got ahold of a project from another user that is having this issue and have some answers for you. It took a bit of digging but here's what I found out:

There is a bug with noise removal in CS8 that causes it to not be as effective as it was in 7. This is being addressed. However, this is NOT the cause of the hum being added when noise removal is enabled.

The noise removal components we use in CS8 will add hum to the audio if the incoming signal has a DC offset. This is most often caused by faulty audio hardware. It's easy to see it if you put the audio into an editor like Audacity (the waveform won't be centered at zero).

It's possible that the components we used in CS7 (which were different) automatically corrected DC offset. We weren't aware that the new ones do not do this. In the long term, we will probably be exploring a way to do that ourselves. For now, the only way will involve splitting the audio out to a separate file and using something like Audacity to correct the DC offset. I may post a quick tutorial showing how that can be done later on. If you can get as far as Audacity, the Normalize function (under effects) has an option for DC offset.

Sorry again for all the trouble, but thank you for reporting the issue.

Randy
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martinsalter

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Hi there

This suggestion is insane! I have camtasia version 7 and was very pleased with the way it silenced out background noise.

I now upgraded (and paid I might add) to version 8 and the sound removal just plain does not work by comparison to v7.

To tell us to output audio, edit in FREE software and then import back to then begin working on our camtasia video is madness and a little insulting when we paid for the product which we would expect to be as good if not an improvement on the previous version.

I hope you can correct this as for now, I wasted money on an upgrade I cannot use unless I want way more work. For now I am going back to v7 to keep up with the workload from my clients without having to export and edit audio elsewhere first.

Come on Techsmith, you can do better than this?

Martin Salter
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Larry Alex

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I have a contributor who submitted 4 .avi files, all with 60-cps hum. The results of removing the hum with CS8 are all over the place. On one file, a +6 setting did an OK job. Two others show some reduction. The fourth file I can't make any better.

Frustrating? You betcha!

However, CS7 used to do a decent, not great, job on hum. Going to have to futz ( a technical term) with splitting out the audio and Audacity. Bleh.

Please fix ASAP... I'm hoping with an update to CS8.

Here's an idea, how about a built-in 50 and 60 cps filter with a check box as 99% of the time, if there's a hum, it's one of these two power-line frequencies.
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martinsalter

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I noticed that there are many more glitches in this thing too.

Video jumps, when editing some of the call out features are all over the place. I think this was released well before it was ready. Overhaul maybe, but we are the ones testing it.

I am going back to 7 until updates are released to sort this out. This is eating in to time we do not have to spare for our clients.

Martin
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ed lamb

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For now, the only way will involve splitting the audio out to a separate file and using something like Audacity to correct the DC offset. I may post a quick tutorial showing how that can be done later on.

Where is tutorial? Specifically how to split audio, export to Audacity, remove hum, and import back to Camtasia.
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Looqmaan

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I also have the problem that noise cancellation is not working nearly as well as in CS7. I upgraded to CS8 when it was released but I haven't been using it because of this issue.

I make tutorials so sound quality is key for me, and I was looking forward to CS8 because of the new codec as there is a lot of motion captured in some of my videos.
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ed lamb

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downloaded 8.02 and it helped some of my clips.... others it did not help. still can not figure out how to use manual sound adjuster. I do 5 seconds of blank sound but it tells me To select a sound section as though I had not selected one already.
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Randy Schott

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Hi Ed,

The 5 second message is a little misleading, it's actually supposed to be a more generic message indicating that the section you tried to train on was rejected by the noise reduction engine for some reason. 5 seconds is actually the *maximum* length allowed for noise training. 1 second of audio should be more than enough. I wouldn't go any shorter than half of a second. If it keeps failing, try again on another section of the clip.

We're working on improving the workflow of the audio effects tab to be a little less confusing.

Randy
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Jess Wilkinson

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Randy, How about giving a more useful reason for us to work with. The 5 sec message is misleading, but "for some reason" is not really any better. How about a list of 3 most common reasons...
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Randy Schott

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I'm sorry, I didn't mean to be vague. The truth is we use a third party component for noise reduction. We feed audio into that component for "training", and it gives us back a noise profile that we can later use while processing the audio.

"For some reason" is about as close as we can get at the moment. When I've tested it internally, some chunks of audio will cause the third party component to fail and return an error when we try to train it. There is no specific error, it just fails. We will probably be getting in touch with that vendor to see if there is a way to get more detailed information.

In general, I believe it fails if it determines the audio is unsuitable for noise training. This might mean that there are wild fluctuations in the audio that don't provide a steady pattern. It could mean that the portion of audio is completely silent. It could mean it is too long or too short. Anywhere between a half second and a second should be plenty of data to train on (that's what we use internally when working with the product).

Hope that is a little more helpful?
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Ivan Uzafatau

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I remove noise in Audacity. No complaints.
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Randy Schott

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I had promised a tutorial on how to remove DC offset from recordings before bringing them in to Camtasia Studio. Sorry it took so long, but here it is:

http://www.screencast.com/t/LY6XaDeGdSl

Hopefully that will help some of you.
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Jess Wilkinson

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How about a DC offset selector in Cam Audio correction panel.

This DC offset recording hardware issue is a fairly common problem with bad mic setups. (Most PC's & unbalanced mics.)

Using Audacity to stripping audio out & back via 16 bit conversions in will require more re-trans code steps and introduce more digitizing error in the final audio (shows up as harmonic distortion & poor quality Cam noise reduction results, ringing & strange canned glitches, etc.)

Anything to reduce conversion steps should help final quality...
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Deb Lovemytechy

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has this issue been fixed yet in Camtasia? 
is the DC offset fixing ability added?
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Jess Wilkinson

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By the way - audio quality is probably one of the most important areas to focus for Camtasia engineering improvement. How about a 24 or 32 bit workflow with a 16 bit output option. At 15 fps camtasia is not really a video speed demon, yet the use I have for it wants a DVD or HD quality sound track output. All the current 16 bit hashing of data inside camtasia tends to render a 10 bit distortion level output unless a lot of careful work is  done to capture audio outside of camtasia and patch it back in a Non Linear Editor outside of Camtasia.

Imagine if that kludge were removed?  Featured in Camtasia 15?

See the guys behind GoldWave for better audio engineering & plugins...
http://www.goldwave.com/

Maybe a partnership deal there would be worth investigating
(Edited)
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Nick Moffitt

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Jess:

Camtasia 15 - too funny! At the rate this topic is progressing, your prediction might end up proving to be optimistic.

I'm amazed this conversation is still necessary 3 years after my original post. I quit using Camtasia for audio when Randy Schott pointed out that Audacity was a better tool. I agree with martinsalter - it's insane for a developer to suggest using a free 3rd party app to fix their mess; that's just giving up.

Thanks for the link to GoldWave - it looks interesting. How does it compare to Audacity?