Camtasia Studio support of MP4, SWF, and FLV file formats

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  • Updated 4 years ago
We want to take this opportunity to explain current video technology trends, the benefits of using MP4 files, and why Camtasia Studio will no longer support producing FLV or SWF files in future releases.

Use MP4 to share your videos with anyone, anywhere, on nearly any device!

Here at TechSmith, we are continuously revising and updating our products to help our customers succeed in today’s fast-paced, technology-driven environment.

With the rise of mobile video, the MP4’s ability to be shared easily and play across devices has helped it become the top video file format in the video industry today.

What makes MP4 the best file format for Camtasia Studio and you?


  • MP4 files provide high quality video with compression that creates small file sizes for quick-and-easy sharing!

  • Video hosting sites such as Screencast.com, Vimeo, YouTube, and iTunes play videos using MP4 files.

  • Many distribution platforms, like Screencast.com, Vimeo, and Apple’s iTunes store list MP4 as their preferred file format.

  • All major web browsers now support MP4 playback.



Why is using MP4 files instead of FLV or SWF files for your Camtasia Studio videos a better option?


  • Camtasia Studio and Screencast.com will not support producing FLV or SWF file types in the future.

  • FLV files are rarely served up by video hosting services anymore, and many distribution platforms, like Vimeo and Apple’s iTunes store no longer support the FLV format.

  • FLV content on websites is not available on many mobile devices.

  • SWF files can cause viewers’ machines to use a lot of resources to load and play the files.

  • FLV or SWF files typically create large file sizes that are much harder to share than MP4 and lack playback ability on many mobile devices.



For video that can be viewed by anyone, anywhere, on the greatest number of devices, the MP4 format has become the latest standard in video. That is why we strongly recommend the use of MP4 for your Camtasia Studio videos.

NOTE: If you are creating videos using the default settings in Camtasia 7, you are already producing MP4 videos and do not need to do anything differently!



Not sure how to produce or share a MP4 Video with Camtasia Studio? Find out!

Want more information on the benefits of using MP4 files instead of FLV files? Learn more.

Why is SWF not actually a video format? Learn more.

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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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Posted 7 years ago

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kurrykid, Champion

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Hmmm, I'm not sure because I haven't used CC but I suspect it's being served up by the Techsmith Smartplayer which isn't included in the MP4 file. One thing you can do is use Captioning in Camtasia. That gets passed on in the MP4 file.
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Mike S

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Closed captioning needs the Smart Player to function. Need to publish to HTML5/MP4, then upload the published folder so the MP4 can find and use the player to display captions
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Marcel Geleijnse

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I agree that MP4 is the way forward and use it to distribute the videos. But not if you want closed caption. Closed caption relies on Shockwave player to play the MP4 and show the closed caption or not show it depending on user selection.
perhaps I am out of touch but I have not come across MP4 file with a CC button that can show captions or not. Let me know if they is a new format MP4 that does this.
It would be real miss if you where to loose the caption capability.
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Mike S

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Doesn't need Shockwave. The captions are connected to the HTML5 code, not the MP4 file. For me, CS8's Smart Player is a great solution for Closed Captioning.
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Marcel Geleijnse

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Thanks Mike S. That is a relieve. Wasn't aware of that.
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AHT

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Regarding these two comments in the initial post:
- "SWF files can cause viewers' machines to use a lot of resources to load and play the files"
- "FLV or SWF files typically create large file sizes that are much harder to share than MP4 and lack playback ability on many mobile devices."

Our team has been using Camtasia since Version 5, and typically produce videos in SWF format. We've found the reverse to be true: SWF files use less resources and are significantly smaller in size than MP4 files. We're now switching to Camtasia 8, and were surprised to discover that we can no longer produce SWF files.

We'd be happy to produce MP4 files (and those on V8 have no choice), but we've found MP4s to be too large and take up too much space on our servers. Do you have suggestions for producing smaller MP4 files? Are there specific settings that you use? What settings do you use to compress an MP4 file?

Thanks for your help!
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Daniel

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I cant see why there was a need to remove the support, just leave it where it was, and add what you have in addition. Webplus web creation software does allow for swf, even with its latest release x6, it was handy for small "looped" animation phumbnails, which are smaller in file size than gif alternitives.
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limcid

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I agree. Never remove features that aren't broken and aren't crippling an application's further development. SWF was simply an option for users (not developers BTW...Users). I think it's a mistake to pull working functionality because of trends.

Many potential clients don't require the latest and cutting-edge versions of file formats, no matter what the justification may be. They simply want what they are used to using. Any change in something as fundamental as file formats means a duality begins to emerge within their archives, and/or a need to upgrade older files/software to keep everything compatible. Not good.

BTW, why does Jing still use SWF? You see, you all have already created a compatibility problem within your own tools by dumping SWF support in CS. I've got a client that requires the use of Jing (they prefer SWF), but Jing doesn't have the toolset I would prefer to use in order to provide more polished videos. I can use CS to create the more polished videos, which they greatly appreciate, but CS won't produce the Jing SWF file format. Soooo, I have to produce in CS to the final resolution needed, then record the results using Jing in order to deliver the desired Jing SWF file format to the client. It's a whole lot of wasted time.

All of your tools should be compatible.
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cadguy

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I agree completely with the above comments. When you've got an engine for flv and swf that works great, why remove that option? It's already there, for Pete's sake! Having the default changed to mp4 is fine, but some of my customers can't view the mp4 files, which really causes issues. I paid for the upgrade to CS8, and like the new functionality, but really don't like having a company decide what's the best way for me to work (much like Facebook's heavy-handed changing of the way things work, in spite of their users' wishes...)

People *really* don't like companies saying "We know you like it that way, but *we* know better so we're going to force you to do it this other way!"

PLEASE add flv and swf capabilities back in, even if it's a hidden option!!!! PLEASE!!!
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Eric Holmlund

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I totally agree. I bought CS8 (as I do all the new versions), but now I'm stuck using CS7 whenever I want FLV or SWF. As others have mentioned, we can often make much smaller files with FLV than with MP4... this is especially true when lowering the frame rate for low-action videos, like slideshows. Also it seems browsers still support FLV as much as MP4.
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Tom R.

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I have to create video tutorials to be played on a range of OS (Linux, UNIX, Windows). Many of the workstations are not allowed to have internet connections or web browsers, due to security restrictions. SWF has worked well for us. I'd like to use CS8, but without SWF output it's a no-go.
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Leigh

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I'm confused. I am using Camtasia (7.1.0 Build 1631) to create videos in MP4 format, as well as html. I can caption my videos and preview them fine while in Camtasia, but after that, the captioning isn't displayed. They run fine in html with the captions, but I have to have them in MP4 format. How can I do that?
Thanks!
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Luis Claudio LA

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Where do I download Camtasia 7? I want to return to using the previous version. Not found on your site.
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Daniel Foster, Snagit strategy lead

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Hi Luis - you can download old versions of TechSmith software here: http://www.techsmith.com/download/old... (scroll down a bit for Camtasia). Your key for version 8 will work to unlock version 7.
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Luis Claudio LA

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Thanks! I have a key for version 7.
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Bill Slayton

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I noticed a response below which says to switch from restrictive to permissive in SharePoint. I just went to Technet and they say that the change from restrictive to permissive is a code change. Are you kidding me? Even as a collection administrator I don't know how to do this.

I need to embed my Camtasia 8 videos into SharePoint and have the Quiz feature work. Doesn't seem like too much to ask. Can you help? I've produced the video as MP4/HTML5. I used the following code in a wiki page (html editor) and it worked until I tried to save the wiki page.

<!--DOCTYPE HTML--><!-- saved from url=(0014)about:internet -->

HTML {TEXT-ALIGN: center; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #1a1a1a; MARGIN: 20px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; PADDING-TOP: 0px}
BODY {TEXT-ALIGN: center; PADDING-BOTTOM: 0px; BACKGROUND-COLOR: #1a1a1a; MARGIN: 20px; PADDING-LEFT: 0px; PADDING-RIGHT: 0px; FONT-FAMILY: Verdana, Geneva, sans-serif; PADDING-TOP: 0px}

<!-- copy and paste. Modify height and width if desired. -->

I've tried several different methods of pasting embed code (with the correct pathing) into wiki pages.

I need to get this working today if possible. Looking for some quick help.

Thanks!
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Bill Slayton

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It stripped out most of the html I posted.
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Richard Campbell, Champion

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You would attract more attention to your plight if you posted your problem as a new topic with a descriptive title like "Sharepoint help" , rather than posting to an unrelated thread with over 100 replies.
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Doug R

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Your reasoning for dropping SWF support might be valid for many general use cases, but you are overlooking a very important one that is negatively impacted by this decision.

When Camtasia is NOT used for heavy video content, but is instead used for showing mostly static slides (with occassional annotations and video screen cap demos mixed in -- these are the reasons I'm using Camtasia), the file size for SWFs turns out to be MUCH SMALLER than MP4s, just the OPPOSITE of the broad claim you make about SWFs being much larger in size. This is because SWFs handle static content MUCH more efficiently than MP4, by simply being smart enough to not create frame after frame of video data when nothing is changing.. So, your decision to drop the SWF export option now forces my slide-oriented productions to have BIGGER files with LONGER download times.

Furthermore, in Camtasia 7, long slides with narration that included callouts resulted in some loss of sync (when using MP4) between the appearance of the callouts and the associated audio/video -- the longer the clip, the worse the sync problem became... This was never a problem when exporting to SWFs. I don't know if this has been resolved in 8, but if it hasn't been, that's another strike against the decision.

So, I'd say you did not think this through very well for the use cases I mention, which are probably more common than you realize, especially in the eLearning community where flash is (and still needs to be) alive and well whether we like it or not. Not everyone uses Camtasia for pure video, and not everyone cares about targeting flash-phobic Apple devices. .
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DC Brouse

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Doug R expresses my thoughts very well. I have been using Camtasia since version 3 to record .ppt lectures, with audio narration. By rendering them to .swf I can provide very acceptable quality lectures that are 8 to 10 MB for 45 to 50 minutes. This small footprint of .swf lecture files is a major benefit of using Camtasia. Even when using very aggressive size saving settings the .MP4 is over twice the size. I am saddened by this decision.
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Eric Salerno

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I'm viewing this topic because I wanted to produce swf files to be imported into Prezi (then re-recorded with Camtasia). I am now kind of stuck without a tool to add animations into Prezi.
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Andrew Gould

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I upgraded following the webinar last year and what a mistake. I need SWF and FLV. Studio 8 has no value at the moment without this function.
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Mark

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I submitted a comment about this about 8 months ago and never got a reply. Shane's reply to Andrew's dilemma made me feel like I need to jump in again today because it almost felt insulting.

"Why do you need SWF and FLV?" Really?! People have commented over and over again in this thread stating why they need those formats. We need those formats because our customers (the people who are PAYING us) need them. They grew dependent on those formats. They built processes, procedures and user expectations around those formats. They liked the advantages that SWF and FLV gave them. MP4 isn't a better option for them and a switch to MP4 will not be cheap or easy for them.

While it is simple for you to say to just "switch to mp4" or "I guess you just have to keep using V7," it's not that easy for us. You are getting between us and our customers. You are making us choose between our customers needs and new functionality in future versions of your product. You are forcing an issue on people that they didn't see coming. As cadguy astutely observed, you seem to be saying that you know better than us and our customers. It is not nice to put us, your customers, in that position. You don't seem to be willing to even try to understand that we have real, valid concerns with the removal of SWF and FLV and that MP4 is NOT a better fit for all situations.

As I said before, this decision might be good for your business, but its not good for mine. (Deep breath) ... Ok, I feel better. Thanks for listening.
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Eric Salerno

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I just finished sending an email to a client about this very topic. We've previously produced their files in flv format, and it's largely because it helped them accommodate legacy systems of their clients that may or may not be connected to the internet (I create demos that they use to help sell and teach their product). They're now investigating further about whether we can use the HTML output from Camtasia with their mp4 files to get the job done.
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Eric Holmlund

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I fully agree with Mark. I can't help but wonder if there is some sort of hidden agenda here. Clearly FLV and SWF are still useful and are not obsolete. I'm wondering if there is some sort of licensing deal, or if someone is pushing Mp4 to be the new standard for competitive reasons. Or maybe it's as simple as techsmith wanting to streamline their product and save money.
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cadguy

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Agreed, Eric. Sure seems like something is going on behind the scenes to cause this. If it's the last idea i.e. "wanting to streamline their product and save money" then I'm not sure it'll be a good thing for them... I don't know how just keeping a fully functional flv and swf engine in the product costs them any additional money -- they could just leave it as-is! However, if they don't add those formats back in, I'm guessing there will be a bunch of us who will refuse to give them any more of our money, which will actually result in lost revenue for them (as well as unhappy customers).

I've been a Camtasia user since 2003 (v1 or v2.0), and have always highly recommended the product to friends looking for video capabilities. However, since the removal of the swf and flv formats, those recommendations are not nearly as enthusiastic; rather, they're more along the lines of "Well, it's good, but ..."

Come on, folks at TechSmith! You've got so many great options in the product, I don't know why you'd take out these two VERY widely used and popular formats. PLEASE put them back! PLEASE!
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Andrew Gould

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Shane: I have already raised this in a ticket. I use another tool to create SCORMs because the Camtasia implementation has no bookmarking (and other limitations at the moment) making it unsuitable for my requirements. The other tool needs FLVs for video for desktop playback.
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Kevin Gutzman

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I have repeatedly produced my video, but then when I try to e-mail my MP4 file to myself as a test, I can't open the file. It says, "This .camproj file does not contain valid data" or some such.

My question is, once I've produced my video, what do I need to do to get the MP4 to e-mail to someone? Why is it showing up with this MP4.camproj ending to its filename instead of simply .MP4?

Thank you.
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Daniel Ripley

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Looks like you have named the file MP4, but saved just the project because a .camproj is nothing more than a project file, its not a video file.

Check the file size, if its KB in size, then you havent sent a video file. If its the expected size, then for some reason its not got the correct file extention, its should be moviename.Mp4 after you have (produce) the video
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cadguy

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@Kevin: When you produce the file, you should get several files along with the .mp4. I would recommend checking the location where your production files are being generated and make sure you're getting the produced mp4 file..

I'm really puzzled by the error message you are seeing with your test mp4 file. I don't know why you'd get an error mentioning a .camproj file when you're opening an mp4.

As Daniel said, it sounds like you're working with the .camproj file rather than the actual produced mp4 file.

Can you open the mp4 file (before you send it) with a program such as VLC or other media player? That'd be the first thing to check, I believe...
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limcid

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Let's try to stay on-topic, please.
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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This is a great conversation that's separate from the main topic, so I created a new topic to continue the discussion. Please reference the new topic here: How to get an MP4 to email to someone?
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Kristin Jones

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I am sure glad I read this before buying the Camtasia 8 upgrade. I won't be purchasing it now without FLV and, especially SWF formats.
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Eric Salerno

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Like I said, I am in the middle of discussing this with one of my customers. Here's a direct quote from them:
"We currently ship our own stand alone flash player application with our product, which enables us to run the flv files on XP without need for the user to install any additional software." (they use demos I produce in their product)

So based on the specs for file delivery for this customer's project, my process is going to be more complicated (or less productive) than it should be. My options are:
a) Work and publish from CS7 (less productive, no multi-track editing)
b) Try working in CS8 and then try publishing/converting with CS7 (comments on that from Techsmith Staff?)
c) Publish with CS8 and try converting with something else like ffmpeg (which I haven't used before)

So Techsmith:
If we're not going to see flv (or swf) added back into CS8 anytime soon, what's the recommended process to convert CS8 published files to flv when it's a requirement?
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Richard Campbell, Champion

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Dave:
Let me give you a publishing analogy to customer complaints when you delete software features - When an author takes out a topic from an accounting book (normally (when the topic is outdated), that author gets howls of complaints from professors, that something awful is going on. As a result, publishers do not do proper pruning of the topics and the books get bloated. And the leading intermediate accounting book that i work in providing Camtasia videos for is now around 1,400 pages and counting. And by the way the project that I am working on now is because they want me to redo the movies I rendered to flv into the mp4 format. Sometimes the customer does not understand that what he wants is not necessarily what he needs.
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Eric Holmlund

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@Dave thanks much for the reply!

I had overlooked the 2-players-in-one feature. I'm not really up-to-speed on all the latest browser compatibility. Do I understand correctly that most phones still don't support flash? In which case the html5 player would automatically load?
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cadguy

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@Dave, thanks for the additional information on the issues with swf. Do the same issues apply with flv? That's a format we used a lot...
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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@Eric: Sorry I missed your reply. Yes, that's correct. Phones generally do not support Flash, so the HTML5 player would automatically load when played in the browser on the phone. The iPhone is an exception, however. On the iPhone, when you click on the video, the iPhone launches the native video player on the phone, which goes full screen. This is fine in many cases, but it precludes the use of HTML5 to add the interactive features (Table of Contents, Hotspots, quizzing, etc.). To enable these features on the iPhone, we have an app named the TechSmith Smart Player (free) which the user will be prompted to install (if they don't have it), and will be used instead of the native iPhone player in order to enable the interactive content. Again, as the content author, you don't need to do anything special. We've done the heavy lifting for you. You just publish your video, either with the Share to Screencast option (easiest), or by using the "MP4 with video player" presets and hosting the video on your own web server. If you're interested, this video has more details: http://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-cam...

@cadguy: No, FLV does not have the same problems as SWF. FLV is a whole different story. If you need it, you can use the workarounds that have already been posted.
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Eric Holmlund

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@Dave Thanks for the additional information! OK, you've sold me on MP4 over FLV, and your player, due to the compatability. So now I'm using CS8 instead of CS7. And I'll use the Camtasia player where possible. However, I still have to use jwplayer for some of my uses. For example, I need to be able to embed a video with NO controls except for play/pause on click. This is VERY common in the marketing community. I just paid jwplayer $97 just to license it on 1 domain (Note, jwplayer IS a dual HTML5/Flash player). So I think you guys are missing a good opportunity to fulfill a need that would probably be pretty easy for you. I'm not a programmer but I would think the "no controls" player would be a breeze to create. Also, I think the reason jwplayer and flowplayer are the most popular players on the web right now is because they are fully customizable. If you guys created a fully skinnable player, I bet it would be a big hit. That's my vote for CS9 :)
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emily

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i need the SWF/FLV video format for my site. how can i have it since im using Camtasia 8?
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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emily,

The workarounds have all been posted in this thread. Briefly, you have 2 options:

1. Install CS7 side-by-side with CS8, use your CS8 key to unlock CS7, then build and produce your project in CS7.
2. Install CS7 side-by-side with CS8, use your CS8 key to unlock CS7, build your project in CS8, produce to AVI, take AVI into CS7, and produce to SWF/FLV. I posted more detailed steps in response to Eric Salerno, in the post just above yours.

Hope this helps.
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pilar caicedo

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Dave

We are triying to use your solution to create SWF files, however it doesnot work.

We need to create SWF files with Scorm and when we check the files created, we cannot find the controller.swf which it ́s neccesary to run the html.

In the process to produce the file, we can check that camtasia 7 will created the controller. swf file however when the process finish, this file is missing.

Could you help us?
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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With the SCORM output (in both CS7 and CS8), the default settings will produce a .zip package, which puts the video, and all supporting files (SWF, JS, HTML, etc.) into a single zip file. Most LMS systems allow you to upload a new course (or SCO, to use the SCORM terminology) as a .zip file. Perhaps that's the confusion?

It sounds like we may need to work with you directly to understand the problems you're seeing, and to help troubleshoot them. It's probably best if you visit http://support.techsmith.com and open a ticket there. Someone from our TechSupport staff will follow up with you by email to help troubleshoot further.
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pilar caicedo

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In case that we are creating a FLV files with scorm, the Zip file have to content the controller.swf file?
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pilar caicedo

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that handles flash version camtasia studio 8
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Biggly

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Are you serious?

I'm online trying to find a way to get Camtasia to open MP4 files, it says it doesn't have the codec!

What use was buying snagit when it produces files Camtasia can't edit!??
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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Biggly,

Camtasia Studio 8 should be able to open the MP4 files created by Snagit. Please open a support ticket at http://support.techsmith.com and someone from our TechSupport staff will follow up with you by email to help troubleshoot the problem further.
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Biggly

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Mmm, the help center shows that newer versions have fixed this problem. It also says that for me to "upgrade" to a version that works will cost me $149? there's some diagnostic tool for version 6, I'm using version 3..
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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Support for MP4 files on the timeline was not added until version 6.0.1. You will need to upgrade for this feature. I'd suggest using the 30 day trial of the latest version, to see if it meets your needs.
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Biggly

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Being able to work with the files produced by your screen capturing 'snagit' shouldn't be a feature, it should come as standard. I wouldn't mind but snagit is ONLY capable of producing MP4 files, ie the one type of file older version of Camtasia can't open? Well thanks for that.

I was especially peeved as I used snagit to record a paypal transaction, proving that I'd used the 'friends and family' gift thing (meaning no chance of a later chargeback) and then found myself with a file I couldn't edit.

In fairness I should have just used Camtasia for the recording, I just presumed a Techsmith product would work with another Techsmith product. Silly me.

Pay $149 to upgrade? No. I can buy Cyberlink Director for less than $80 and their demo did a fine job of editing my MP4.
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BMarshall

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I'm not very happy with this. Currently we publish our elearning using an MP4 file and an SWF controller. In CS7 this wasn't a problem. In CS8, the controller seems to be prepackaged and contains an old date (12/9/12) for everything I produce, no matter how I produce it. This is causing a disconnect between the movie and controller when the link is accessed and breaking my link so no one can view my movies/WBTs.

I am the first one actively using this new version - we have had both CS6 and CS7 previously - and my colleagues are not going to be pleased with the workarounds provided. Guess it's time to revisit Captivate and Storyline, and talk to my boss about not buying any more upgrades to Camtasia if this is the way things are going to roll. Nice additions to the features, but doing double work on the rendering sort of cancels it out.
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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BMarshall,

Camtasia Studio 8 still supports producing to MP4 with a SWF controller. The SWF output referenced in this thread was a lesser used option where the video itself was encoded as SWF.

I'm not sure what's causing the date issue you describe. This is not a known issue. It's going to take some one on one troubleshooting to figure out what isn't working on your end. If you'd like our help with this issue, please open a ticket at http://support.techsmith.com and someone from our TechSupport staff will follow up with you by email to help troubleshoot further.
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kdock

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I, too, need videos w/o controller -- simple, elegant, autoplay animation on web site. Flash did this for me, but I can't find the code/options for embedding any kind of CS8 output in this way. Is there a tutorial somewhere?
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Keith

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I have used Studio in the past and like others used the many formats.

I’m looking at creating a document in Word, convert to pdf, then add video files, I use the video mp4 from Snagit, but when I use
Acrobat 11 it says I must encode it to H.264, the Adobe site says:

Convert multimedia files in a PDF Portfolio (Acrobat Pro)
You can convert the following component multimedia files to PDF within a PDF Portfolio: FLV files, SWF files, F4V, mp3. You can also convert these files to PDF if they are encoded in H.264 (with AAC audio): MOV, M4V, MP4, 3GP, and 3G2. (H.264 and AAC are encoding and compression options for movies.)
Note: To convert AVI or WMV files to PDF, or other multimedia file types to FLV format, use the Adobe Media Encoder. This application is available in the Acrobat X Suite or Creative Suite.
1. In Edit mode, right-click/Control-click one or more multimedia files in the PDF Portfolio and select Convert To PDF.
2. If a dialog box appears, specify the options as needed and click OK.

I have been away from video formats for a while, if I get output from a tool in mp4 and want to embed it into a pdf, are they saying you can’t use mp4 and must convert using the Encoder that is part of the
Creative Suite? And isn't that only available now only in the Creative Cloud?
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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Keith,

The output from Snagit and Camtasia Studio is already in the format recommended by the Adobe site you referenced. Specifically, we create MP4 files with H.264 video and AAC audio, which is the format they're suggesting you use. I would recommend contacting Adobe support, as it sounds like a problem with Acrobat 11, or else their documentation is wrong.
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kurrykid, Champion

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Unfortunately Dave, I think Keith is right. When I put the Camtasia:Mac and Snagit:Mac Interactive PDF's together, Acrobat XI (Pro) wouldn't accept the MP4 files I created from CMAC.

I didn't spend a whole lot of time trying to figure out why...I just used Adobe Media Encoder to encode them over to .mov files and they worked just fine.

It sounds like you're working on a PC but if you have the full version of Quicktime (which comes on a Mac), you can use that to convert to .mov files as well.

I wish I could provide a better solution but converting them to a different format was fairly easy so that's what I did.

HTH

Dave
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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Thanks Dave. I believed Keith when he said it didn't work. What I'm suggesting is that the problem may be on the Acrobat side. We're creating standard MP4 files, and according to their own docs, it should work. I don't know what checks they're doing before importing video files into Acrobat. So the answer needs to come from Adobe.

Also, both Camtasia Studio and Camtasia for Mac support export to MOV (using H.264 and AAC). This uses QuickTime under the hood on both platforms. The MOV export is not preferred as the render is generally slower and worse quality. But if it gets you a compatible file, this might be a workaround.
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kurrykid, Champion

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Yep, I think it is on the Acrobat side as well.

Thanks.
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Richard Campbell, Champion

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It's been awhile - a couple of years, but I successfully imported a Camtasia file into Acrobat, but loading performance was awfully l slow, with even small Camtasia video files - which was a basic flv file. So I gave up using the Acrobat to embed the videos.
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Dozer

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So, does everyone realize that you can take the .camrec file that was recorded in Camtasia Studio 8, and drop that into Camtasia Studio 7?
So hopefully you know someone that has a machine with Camtasia Studio 7.
Even if you recorded using TSC2.
Though I read that the advantages of TSC2 are lost when
going .swf ??
You will then be able to export in .SWF format.

However, when dropping into Camtasia 7, it creates an extra audio file on a
third track, called system audio, which is blank audio, and can be deleted.

I usually get smaller file size with .swf
And when you sale DVD tutorials, having them in .mp4, you are more likely to run into piracy, and people uploading the DVD contents to youtube.
Which you then have to go through reporting them to youtube,ect...
Sure, you can convert .swf, but some either won't know how, or have
to go through trouble of doing so.

When exporting the project, exports to .swf are also faster.

.swf files brought into old Camtasia Theater, are exported with necessary files to
open in browser. And you can use SWF Toolbox to create a Macromedia Projector .exe file for PC users to run the tutorials.

I think the option should still be viable, but that is just me.
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Nanditha Suresh

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Hello Dave,
In our documentation, we are trying to import the video files into Acrobat directly, for offline viewing. But the concern is about the huge file sizes that can limit the number of videos we might like to embedd.
Can you suggest any means by which we can further reduce the MP4 files? Our Subject Matter Experts are the ones who create the Camtasia recordings and then gets passed onto the tech documentation team. Will be great help if you can suggest a workaround.

Thanks
Nanditha
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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Nanditha,

Sorry for the late reply. I did not see your post until tonight. In answer to your question, the file size of the MP4 is affected by many factors. Here's a few ideas:
1. Record, edit, and produce at a smaller dimension. The smaller the dimensions, the lower the file size.
2. Shorten the length of your videos.
3. Produce at a lower frame rate. The default is 30fps, but depending on your content, a lower frame rate might be acceptable.
4. Produce at a lower quality level. There's a quality slider in the MP4 settings when producing with custom production settings. Adjust the quality slider to the left for a smaller file. Depending on your content, you may or may not notice a difference in visual quality.
5. Produce at a lower audio bitrate that you consider acceptable audio quality.

It may take some experimentation to find settings that optimize file size for the content you're trying to produce. In general, the defaults in Camtasia Studio do a pretty good job with a wide variety of content. But there's always room for tweaking.

When producing with custom production settings, note that there's a Preview button in the lower-left corner of the production wizard. This will produce the first 30 seconds of the video, and is ideal for trying out different production settings to assess the impact on file size.

Hope this helps.
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Peter DeCourcy

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It's fine, I suppose, if you want to get rid of producing to flash, but why would you still have the option to use transparent hotspots in the Callouts menu? There's no way to export them into MP4.
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Kevin Mojek, Employee

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As Dave O'Rourke wrote earlier in this thread, Camtasia Studio 8 still supports producing to MP4 with a Flash player. The SWF output referenced in this thread was a lesser used option where the video itself was encoded as SWF.

With CS 8, there are two implementations of the player. In most cases, if Flash is supported, the player will run the Flash (SWF) version. When Flash is not available, the HTML5 implementation will run. This allows the player to work on a wide variety of devices and browsers with full support for hotspots, quizzing, etc.
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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Right. What Kevin says is true

In answer to your question about hotspots, the transparent hotspots will work as long as you Produce to Screencast.com (the simplest option), or use one of the "MP4 with video player" presets and then host the video + player on your own website. In order for the video playback to pause and wait for a click, the player itself must implement this logic. We did that with CS7 and earlier releases, and we still have that in CS8. The player that comes with Camtasia Studio (and also the one on Screencast.com) knows what to do with hotspots, and this is what makes it work. The hotspots will not work if you just take the MP4 and upload to YouTube, or play it in a different player, such as Windows Media Player, QuickTime Player, VLC, etc. These 3rd party players are fine, but they don't know anything about hotspots, which is why only the video works in these players.

Hope this helps.

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