Choose to interpret frame rate for external cameras

  • 1
  • Idea
  • Updated 1 month ago
Premiere Pro has a nice option in which you can re-interpret the frame rate of imported footage. The idea behind this option would be to keep imported footage in sync with the captured screen.

Here's a use case: GoPro footage shot at 30 fps is actually recorded at 29.98 frames, but the GoPro cameras don't really tell you this. Camtasia interprets this footage as 30 fps, which leads to captured audio being out of sync with the GoPro camera footage. My suggestion is to either interpret 29.98 fps GoPro footage at the correct frame rate, or let users decide how imported footage shall be interpreted in general (perhaps by adding a context menu on imported clips).

Currently, a workaround for this issue is to record both the screen and the GoPro at 25 fps, in which case the footage stays in sync with the screen capture.
Photo of Jay Versluis

Jay Versluis

  • 24 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
  • happy

Posted 1 month ago

  • 1
Photo of Paul Middlin

Paul Middlin, Employee

  • 835 Posts
  • 185 Reply Likes
I believe that in general, we do attempt to leverage the frame rate (and therefore correct timing), however sometimes it is mis-reported. Not sure if that's happening here.
Anyway, in the mean time, hopefully you have found that you can add "clip speed" to either the audio or the video and drag it to match the length of the other to get them in sync.
Photo of Jay Versluis

Jay Versluis

  • 24 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
Hi Paul, trust me I've tried that - and it neither works reliably, nor is it a particularly good idea to speed up/slow down camera footage by an arbitrary amount for every project. Camtasia doesn't handle edits with clip speed in place that well, and tends to slips sync all over the place.

The 25 fps solution seems stable enough in my workflow for now. However, GoPro cameras are ubiquitous these days and should be properly supported in Camtasia. To make the implementation easier, and to be of help for the many other cameras that may mis-report their timecode, perhaps letting the user choose to interpret footage is a long-term solution.
Photo of Paul Middlin

Paul Middlin, Employee

  • 834 Posts
  • 185 Reply Likes
Thanks for the feedback, Jay. It's helpful.
Photo of Jay Versluis

Jay Versluis

  • 24 Posts
  • 7 Reply Likes
You're very welcome, Paul! If you need any test footage or further information, I'm happy to help :-)