Compressing video size

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I need to create video upto max 50 MB. The already created videos are anywhere between 70-80MB. How do I compress videos without affecting the quality?
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SB

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Posted 2 months ago

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Naomi Skarzinski

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Dubie

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As Naomi posted

Handbrake is probably the most commonly used method.

You can also use FFmpeg in a variety of ways. By way of the command prompt or with one of the multiple UI interfaces out there.

Truth is almost all conversion/compression softwares use FFmpeg in the background
including Handbrake.

I use both.  FFmpeg from the command prompt  but Handbrake makes it easier.

Here is a good write up on using Handbrake that should be helpful.
https://www.makeuseof.com/tag/reduce-video-file-size-without-sacrificing-quality/


:)
(Edited)
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rg

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The key is "without affecting the quality."  At some point, to some degree, compression will affect image quality.  Depending on the algorithm used to compress the data, the process may introduce more or fewer artifacts in the resulting stream -- but there will always be some loss.  Think of it this way:  you can't remove information and expect to see the same level of detail -- and the more information you remove, the more detail is lost.  However, some methods of compression are better than others, relying on more precise removal of duplicate information in order to shrink the file size.
All of that being said, Handbrake is the most popular choice for compression -- although it's hard to tell whether it's superior to every other option.
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Joe Morgan

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It really depends on content. You can lower the quality doing a custom production in Camtasia to say 50%.


If your content is nothing more than a screen recording. You didn't use zoom in and zoom out animations. It's a Microsoft WORD tutorial, or perhaps a Excel Tutorial.Things of this nature. Lowering the quality shouldn't hurt the overall quality.

Recording with highly detailed images and videos. Content with a lot of colors. You'll find increasing the quality may be warranted instead. That's just the way it is.

I don't know what video dimensions your working with? If it's 1920 x 1080. You might want to think about switching to 1280 x 720. It will reduce file size dramatically and should leave you plenty of head room to produce at normal to higher quality output levels.

Regards,Joe

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rg

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Looking at your screen capture made me chuckle, remembering what our video engineers always used to say that NTSC stood for: "Never The Same Color."
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Joe Morgan

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Some Follow up,

So, just as an example.


Here I used a 1920 x 1080 video clip containing a fair amount of color and contrast. It's not as vibrant as a lot of footage I could have chosen. I thought this footage would represent a good "Average Quality" non screen recording video.

I converted it using HandBrake's default quality settings. "HQ, 1080p 30fps Surround “And “Fast 30fps”

In both cases the conversion washed out the contrast. The Darker areas becoming lighter stands out the most. You can see it in side by side comparisons.Look at the rock face behind the waterfall.It's pretty dark overall.Than look at the conversions wall.

Overall, it has a washed out effect on everything.  Some quality and clarity takes a hit. Camtasia renders are off a bit as well.But there much closer.

Be sure to click the images and enlarge them to 100%. The differences really stand out.You'll have to pan around.

First Example

 

Second example


I render the same footage using Camtasia. I rendered using 60% quality and 50% quality settings.

Both videos came out better than the HandBrake conversions. The 50% quality video was only slightly larger than the HQ handbrake conversion.

For what’s it’s worth, here’s the Camtasia’s renders.

60% Quality


50% Quality


 If you don’t mind some degradation. A program like HandBrake can help you reduce video size.

In general, people will never know the difference. Even if they viewed the original footage.

Regards,Joe

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Naomi Skarzinski

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Thank you Joe for the screenshots of the Handbrake and Camtasia comparisons. I think it also would be a matter of an individual's preference who is viewing the video (still).  I like the Handbrake version better because I can see more detail in the rock face by the waterfall and the white water pooling is not as blown out.  However, that's me viewing this with only one hour of sleep last night.  LOL I'll take a look at it again when I am fully rested!  ;-)

Thanks again for taking the time to give us a side-by-side sample.
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Joe Morgan

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Okay Naomi Skarzinski,

I found the time to do some follow up. I don't know exactly what HandBrakes problem is?

But I believe it could be the luminosity levels that are being changed. This is a issue that has been reported going back years in the HandBrake community.

For a lot of Camtasia users, recording their monitors and producing videos.A minor shift in colors could easily go undetected, or perhaps not be necessary.Due to content.

Whereas standard videos, have a lot of color space to be effected.

This is a link to a video someone converted in 2013. I chose it to show how long this problem has existed.The top image is the original video, and the bottom is the HandBrake conversion.  https://imgur.com/a/VPQ7y

I've had better luck with HandBrake in the past.In general, it puts out a good high quality copy of the original.With little detectable degradation.

I was actually surprised how much it altered the video featured above. I just threw it in Camtasia as a test, I wasn't looking at it from a perspective as whether it looked better after rendering.

I was looking at as, does it look identical to the original.Which is what the conversion process should do.

That footage was to dark so I applied color correction in Premier Pro. I tried to do it in Camtasia but it was the mid-tones that needed the most attention. Luminance levels primarily".

You probably can't see all the foliage growing on the rock face of the distant waterfall in my images.

So anyway, here's a color corrected mp4 and a HandBrake High Quality Conversion.
The sun was blinding that day, I wear self darkening  prescription lens.This footage was taken at mid day, Summer.
Camera was on auto pilot settings.

With levels cranked up to bright sunny day, I can't see any difference between the original and the HandBrake conversion. But bear in mind, this is a bright sunny day. Not a dark video.

For what it's worth, HandBrake is nearly flawless under some circumstances.Not so much in others.
 

And here's the actual HandBrake video. It's only a minute long. The Waterfall and cliff below made for a unique place to visit. There as water dumping into this river from all over the place.



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rg

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Nice video!  Regarding luminance, we should bear in mind that many programs automatically impose a limit, clipping video so that it will be within NTSC standards.  For example, you can export a still image from PowerPoint, but if the brightness goes to 255 a video editor will clip it at 242.  As a result, for example, your rich golden-toned graphic background might look a bit like dried mustard (unless you goose up the saturation -- chroma -- either on the PPTx output or within the video editor).