Convert timeline value to seconds and milliseconds

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How do I convert timeline values to seconds and milliseconds?

For instance, I see a timeline value of 0:01:02:15

I think the units are hours:minutes:seconds:thirtieths of a second

So the value is 1 minute + 2 seconds + 15/30 of a second

Which is 62.5 seconds.

Is this right? Is the last number thirtieths of a second?

Thanks,
Jim Andrews
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Jim Andrews

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Posted 10 months ago

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Joe Morgan

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There is an online calculator you can use.
 I've never been able to find a stand alone one for offline use. http://www.michaelcinquin.com/tools/timecode_keykode

It's a little clunky but it works great.
You have to put in each box separately. Hours, min, sec,frames. You can't just copy and paste the timecode all at once.

Regards,Joe

(Edited)
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Jim Andrews

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Thanks very much, Joe!
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kayakman, Champion

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I use the Windows calculator ...

there are 1,000 milliseconds in a second; there are 30 frames in a second

using your example value of 0:01:02:15 ...

15 frames/30 = .5;  .5 * 1000 = 500 milliseconds

1 min 2 sec = 62 sec, or 62,000 milliseconds

so total is 62,500 milliseconds or 62 seconds and 500 milliseconds
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Joe Morgan

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Well I'll be darned, Camtasia's hard coded 30 fps timeline does make something relatively easy after all.LOL 

This is for fun now.  let's see your windows calculations for 29.97fps footage.
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kayakman, Champion

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OK; 15 frames/ 29.97 = 0.5005005005005005 seconds; we'll call it 501 milliseconds

so answer is 62501 milliseconds or 62 seconds and 501 milliseconds

why?

the tool above does not seem to calculate correctly?

if there are 29.97 frames in a second, 15 frames [even] is slightly more than half of 1 sec

or maybe I don't understand what 29.94 FPS means?

more logic ...

if working with 15 FPS, then, per the example, 15 frames = 1 sec

so answer should be 62 sec + 15 frames = 63 sec or 63000 milliseconds

or am I missing something here?

still on my 1st cup of coffee
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Joe Morgan

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0:01:02:15 converted to 62.5 seconds. That's correct according to you and the calculator.

29.97 fps is only .03 fps less. A very small number.
The calculator corrected the elapsed  time to be..........62.495767 seconds. Thats a very small change and I'm thinking it's accurate.
I not very good with math and I'm a big fan of calculators.I was merely attempting to kid around with you about the 29.97 frame rate because the math is complex.
It wasn't intended as a serious challenge or question. A calculator is much faster for frame rates other than 30. That was the joke to me or "On me apparently".

Here is 29 frames on the calculator. Looks right in my mind.


   
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kayakman, Champion

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I did see it as a fun challenge :)

and your last example of 29/29.97 looks OK; I get 0.9676343009676343

but I still think the 15/29.97 one should be 0.5005005005005005

enjoy your day
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Leif, Employee

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Jim, you are correct.  The current release of Camtasia only supports editing  at 30 frames per second (fps).  The timeline values indicate hours:minutes:seconds;frames.  The start of the timeline is at 0:00:00;00.  But the first frame is visible at this time. So the frame is a bit more like an offset rather than the actual frame number.  If you step through the timeline frame by frame ('.' or ',' to step back a frame), you'll notice the frame value change from 0 to 29.  Those are the 30 frames of the first second of the video. Step one more frame and you see the time change to 0:00:01;00.  At this point you are looking at the first frame of the next second of video.  If you were to export this one second section of the video, it would be one second long and that last frame you were looking at would not be included in the output, just the previous frame for it's full duration.  So if you were to put the playhead at 0:00:00;15, you are actually previewing frame 16 in the video, but that frame would not be in the export if you exported just that first portion of the video.  Your exported video would be1/2 of a second (15 / frame rate - in the current release of Camtasia - 30 fps, so 15 / 30) and would contain the first 15 frames of of the video.
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Jim Andrews

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Thanks very much, Leif!