Difference between Project, Canvas and Editing Dimensions

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  • Updated 9 months ago
Hello.  I have read numerous posts on how to be able to zoom without blurring the results.  Here's the issue:  there are THREE keywords that have conflicted in my research (Camtasia 9).
(1) Canvas Dimensions (accessible from the drop down at the top of the screen).  (2) Editing dimensions (3) Project settings.  I record my work at full HD:  1920 X 1080.  But from what I read, to have good results I have to set my "editing" dimensions at lower HD (1280 X 720) so the zooms don't blur.  Question:  Do all three words mean the same thing?  (Project dimensions, canvas dimensions and editing dimensions?).  If I set my canvas dimensions to 1280 X 720 and import a screen capture at full HD (1920 X 1080), will the zoom be clearer?
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richlocus

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Posted 9 months ago

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kayakman, Champion

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bottom line ...

if you capture at 1920x1080, set editing dimensions [project settings] at 1920x1080

then after editing, produce to 1920x1080

if you work with project dimensions that are smaller OR larger than your capture dimensions, you will compromise the quality of the resulting video
(Edited)
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richlocus

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Thanks for your reply.  If I record my screen at 1920 X 1080, edit and produce at the same dimensions, then when I zoom in it gets blurry at the zoom point.  If I record at 1920 X 1080 then set my project dimensions to a lower HD (1280 X 720), then the zooms look great but the overall image is slightly compromised.  Which is better?
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kayakman, Champion

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the capture-edit-produce using same dimensions should always be the better solution; it's just physics

how much are you zooming in?

can you post a short screencast [maybe on free Screencast.com?] demonstrating what issue you are seeing?
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Joe Morgan

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I see where your coming from now. What your describing is a matter of taste. If you record at 1920 X 1080 then set the project dimensions to a lower HD (1280 X 720).

 What happens is you would start by Squishing the 1920 x 1080 video into a 1280 x 720 space. This will have a negative effect on the original videos quality the entire time zoom is not applied.
 Pixels are discarded initially to make the video fit.How good the video looks after that  transformation takes place is dependent on the actual content.
Some content will look much better than other content will.

SO, that's why the zoom work's in your favor. When you zoom in "Up until a certain Point" pixels are put back where they belong. So, even though the image appears larger on the canvas/screen, it's actually closer to it's original size.
Which isn't blurry because it's being returned closer to it's original recorded dimension.

In Short, if you plan on being zoomed into the video, more than zoomed out to full screen. Maybe that's the way to go.

Or maybe you should consider taking High Resolution Still screen shots and inserting them as a "Picture in Picture" or Picture slide show  instead?
Just a thought.  
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richlocus

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After experimenting with different scenarios, this is the best solution:  Record at 1920 X 1080.  Produce at 1920 X 1080.  I can still zoom in up to 200% and there isn't a noticeable degradation of the quality.  Thanks. 
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Joe Morgan

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You want to record, edit and produce your video at the same dimensions. In your case it sounds like 1920 x 1080 applies.
If you change "Any" of the dimensions of the video you will lose clarity. As you zoom some clarity will be lost.
 If you limit zooming to 200% the blurring should not be to bad.Zooming should only  be applied long enough to show a small detail that would be hard to see normally.Then removed so the video comes back into focus. 
 
1280 x 720 is becoming more of an old school optimal dimension for sharing. Original I-phones were low resolution, laptops were all low resolution, even desktops had low res screens. Internet speeds were so slow HD video was a real problem.

1280 x 720  is still optimal to a shrinking audience of people. So it's not inaccurate to say.
However, I wouldn't necessarily record, edit and produce my videos to cater to this smaller group of people.
It depends on where you plan on hosting your videos and what you are hosting.

Linda.com still teach their lessons at 720 and I find the blurry quality to be irritating. There's You Tube tutorials at 1920x1080 covering the same subject matter for free without blurring.Although, not as professionally done.

So I hope I didn't confuse you with my rambling

Regards,Joe
 
    
(Edited)
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richlocus

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Yes:  Record at 1920 X 1080.  Produce at 1920 X 1080.  The smaller version of the HD (1280 X 720) doesn't do well with complex screens.  Also, zooming at full HD isn't an issue as long as you don't go too far above 200% zoom.