edit MP4 file in Camtasia 8

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Can you edit an MP4 file (produced in Camtasia) in Camtasia? I developed an MP4 then had a harddrive crash and lost my media files. But I need to do some editing. 
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Carolyn Smith

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Posted 6 years ago

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kayakman, Champion

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yes; you can use MP4s as source clips on timeline
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turningpointup

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If this still does not work, you may try this method to edit MP4 files at How to Edit MP4 files on Mac or Windows?

This method can easilly help to:
  • Edit MP4 files in the following aspects: cut MP4 files to  capture your favorite clips, crop MP4 to remove the black edges around  your movie video, rotate MP4 video 90 Degrees, 180 Degrees, and 270  Degrees, etc, adjust MP4 video image in brightness, contrast and  saturation, add watermark/subtitle/music to MP4 files, remove/extract  subtitles from MP4 clips, compress big MP4 files to smaller ones, join  several MP4 video into one, split MP4 file, increase or decrease volume  of MP4 movie, adjust bitrate/sample rate/aspect ratio, remove audio from  MP4 media, change audio channel and more for experience;
  • Edit MP4 video as well as keep the source format;
  • Edit MP4 movie as well as convert MP4 to many other video  formats like AVI, MOV, WMV, MKV, FLV, ASF, RM, DV, MXF, WebM, MPG, Apple  ProRes, etc, and audio formats such as MP3, WAV, AAC, AC3, M4A, DTS,  CAF, AIFF, FLAC, MP2, AU, OGG, WMA;
  • Except editing MP4 clips, it supports optimizing many other  video and audio formats, for example, MOV, WMV, MKV, FLV, AVI, AVHCD,  WTV, MXF, WebM, MTS/M2TS, MOD, MP3, WAV, M4B, AIFF, CAF, VOC, OPUS, DTS,  APE;
  • In addition, this wonderful MP4 Editor also works as a Player  with high compatibility and a Downloader which can download video  online;
  • Better still, it has both Mac and Windows version.
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jolinzhu520

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Please convert the recorded file before you use Camtasia (It may cause the video and audio out of sync issue if import the recorded file directly without conversion.)

We use the Brorsoft mp4 converter (It's easy-to-use. Download at http://www.brorsoft.com/video-converter/ or Mac Version http://www.brorsoft.com/video-converter-mac/) to demonstrate the converting steps.
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Carolyn Smith

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And then rerender as an MP4? does it hurt the quality?
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kayakman, Champion

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if you know that your first production [render] will be used as a source file to make other productions, suggest you make that 1st render to AVI format [lossless]

however, AVI renders can result in huge file sizes

I often have to make multiple MP4 renders [due to file size issues] to use in a single composite project which I final render to MP4

the 1st MP4 renders are accomplished with a custom production, where the video quality has been set to at least 70% [vs. the CS default which is 50%]; this greatly improves the MP4 quality; the higher the quality of the MP4 source clips, the higher the quality of the re-render made from the MP4 source clips; I also set quality to 70% for the final render

note: you can use even higher MP4 quality settings, but I've not seen much difference between 70% and 100%, just file size grows substantially

so again, if the 1st render will not be hosted [shared], make it to AVI; but if the 1st render has to be shared, use MP4 at 70%, the re-render at 70%
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hugorter

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Here is a guide to help you do the task at: How to Edit MP4 Video on Mac and Windows?

  • Edit MP4 video like trim, crop, rotate, merge, split, watermark,  subtitle, compress, effect, edit video image, adjust video  bitrates/channel, audio channel, extract audio file from video etc.
  • Besides editing MP4 videos, it also helps to edit AVI, MOV, MKV, DV, VOB, RMVB, FLV, MPEG, AVCHD, etc.
  • Besides editing videos like MP4, it also can edit MP3, M4A, AIFF, AC3, CAF, WAV, WMA, FLAC, Apple Lossless, OGG etc.
  • Aside from editing MP4, it also helps to convert any video or audio  to portable devices like iPhone, iPad, iPod, HTC, Blackberry, PS3,  Android etc.
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gjurczyk

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You don't need other software if you have Camtasia. Open Camtasia. Import media (in this case, the MP4... one or more). Drag the icon of the MP4 into Track1. Edit as necessary. When finished, select File --> Produce and share. Select "MP4 only" from the drop-down list. Select Next. Select a destination on your hard drive or somewhere else and give this new MP4 a name. Select Finish. 

THAT'S IT. How easy is THAT?!  It works GREAT.
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Carol O'S

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I had an mp4 of 20.7 MB. using Camtasia, I cut the file into three parts - I needed to reduce the size. However, I ended up with three files of 15. MB, 13.5 MB and 17.2 MB respectively. How is this possible. The sum of the size of each of these files is greater than the original file.
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kayakman, Champion

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resulting file sizes can depend on numerous factors ...

what dimensions and frame rate was the original?

what do you mean you ended up with 3 files; did you make 3 separate productions from sections of the original?

what dimensions and frame rate did you produce to?

I assume the 3 files were produced to MP4 format?

more details would help
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Carol O'S

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The original dimensions of the MP4 file were 1034 x 768 (5 frames/second).

Using Camtasia,

1) I edited the original file, keeping the first (approx) 20 minutes, and saved as a file (part 1), then I did a File > Produce and Share. I used MP4 with Smart Payer (up to 480p) with dimensions 640 x 480 (scaled to fit). This produced the first mp4 file of 15.6 MB.

2) I then edited the original file again, this time deleting the first 20 minutes, and last (approx 20 minutes). I saved as a file (part 2) and produced and shared as above. This produced the second mp4 file of 13.5 MB.

3) I did the same again for the remaining 25 minutes and produced the third mp4 file of 17.2 MB.

I don't know if this was the best way to do it so if there is another way, I would love to know.

Thanks for your help.
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Robert R., Online Community Admin

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To add on to kayakman's excellent recommendations you will want to make sure you are encoding the audio in the same way. While framerate will certainly go through and affect the size, encoding the audio at a higher sample / bit-rate will also increase the overall video size.

What are the audio settings for the original file?

Note too that the MP4 format is a highly flexible format and at roughly 1 MB per Minute is an excellent (and small) file size for the original content. Compressing it any more may result in the loss of quality. Are you restricted in your file sizes?
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Carol O'S

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Hi
If I look in Properties of the original file, I see that the Audio Format is:
Rate: 8.000 kHz
Sample: 16 Bit
Channels: Mono
Format: Unknown

Yes, I am restricted in file size - I need to produce smaller files so that is why I am trying to divide the original. And it is important that I do not have any lost of quality in video or audio (in fact, that was why i changed from Captivate to Camtasia - as Captivate was re-producing very large files and Camtasia wasn't).
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Robert R., Online Community Admin

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Hi Carol and thanks for the details.

What are the audio settings that you are using in Camtasia's output?

Note that 8 kHz is similar to old-school telephony quality; it's far below what is considered the "standard" in this day and age (44.1 kHz or 48 kHz, which Camtasia produces to). The likeliest reason your files are still fairly large is because of the upconversion to industry standard audio properties that Camtasia is doing. Try doing a Custom Production in the Produce and Share wizard and lowering the audio encoding bitrate to as low as possible.

As a side note, you are producing the new files to a resolution lower than that of the original file; you will likely lose quality.
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Carol O'S

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The bit rate was set at 128 kbps. I could lower it down to 6 kbps.
How do I maintain the same "resolution" as the original? is it the dimension settings?
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kayakman, Champion

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if your original file was 1034 x 768, edit and produce to those same dimensions
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kayakman, Champion

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thanks for the details

your original file had a low frame rate; it is likely that your productions used much higher frame rates[?]; this would significantly increase the individual file sizes

next time you need to break up a large clip, make partial timeline selection, right click the selection, add to Library; repeat for rest of project selections

then, put each section's Library asset on timeline, and treat as separate project; edit; produce

since your original file was a very low frame rate, do custom productions, and set a low frame rate; that should help reduce those file sizes
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Joe Morgan

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Carol, here is my 2 cents.

6kbps is so low it would be inaudible. I know because I just tested a short clip with my voice because this topic intrigued me. I would experiment with the audio settings to find something you can live with.

 I also created a 5 fps recording for my tests.

You need to set you frame rate to 5fps manually to get a video produced at the same frame rate. Camtasia will produce it at 30fps by default when the frame rate is set to automatic. This will reduce the file size somewhat but surprisingly not by very much.

 For what it's worth here are my test results. The video was edited and recorded using  the same dimensions that you are working with. 

 This is the file size of my 30 second video at 30 fps and 128kbps audio.



This one is produced at 5fps with audio at 128kbps.



This is the inaudible 5fps video at 6kbps.



So it looks like audio is the key factor here. Finding that level that still sounds OK may be another matter. I used the default video settings and the video looked good but it was also a Camtasia recording so your results may vary.



I don't know how helpful this truly is but this should  give you an idea of what occurs using different production settings.

Regards, Joe
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Carol O'S

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Thank you all for taking the time to give me the above information, this has been really useful.

I now have a better understanding of frame rates, bit rates, dimensions, etc and how to set them in the custom production settings in Camtasia. The result is that I have reduced the size of the file while still keeping the visual quality and acceptable audio.