Hello all! Is is possible to start a video from a specific chapter (marker), and not the beginning?

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I am working on a learning module and I would like to have a video that can start from a specific chapter, not the beginning. Is this possible in Camtasia?

It's sort of like that option on youtube  where you can start the video from a specific time signature but still have the rest available.

Thank you!
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a-vlvart

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Posted 3 months ago

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Ben Rhodes, Employee

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Hello,

If you host your Camtasia output on screencast.com, we support deep linking to a time in the video.  Screencast.com uses the same TechSmith Smart Player to play back video, but by default local Camtasia productions are not setup to handle this deep linking.

To deep link to a time on Screencast.com, you can append the following to your view page url.

?t=[time] - Where time is string.  An example would be:
?t=20s
This jumps you to 20 seconds in the video.  Change that number to control the number of seconds to jump into the video.

Another example would be:
?t=1m2s
This jumps to 1 minute and 2 seconds in the video.

One note, most web browsers prevent auto play, so the user will still need to click the play button.  Once they do, the video will jump to the correct time code.

Let me know if you have any other questions,
Ben

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kayakman, Champion

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to add to what Ben has provided ...

I use these time query URLs a lot with my videos, both with those  hosted on screencast.com, and with those hosted on my own web site

these time query URLs seem to work just fine off my web site

they also work for videos viewed locally as well

and, although most of my content is set to pause at start, I find there is no need to click a start button as the videos start automatically, where intended

example ...
https://www.screencast.com/t/4Kfzg81ZcCH?t=1m3s
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Joe Morgan

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This video didn't start automatically for me.I had to click it manually to start it.
It started at 1:03 correctly.
I'm using Firefox and have recorded the behavior with Camtasia.Heres a series of 3 screen shots from that recording.
 

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kayakman, Champion

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interesting ...

works for me in Chrome; works for me in Edge

perhaps try Edge and see?

I use a setting in Chrome that enables autoplay; I have no special setting set in Edge
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Joe Morgan

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Worked in Edge, Not Chrome. I believe Ben's post is spot on{:>)
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Rick Stone

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Actually, as I see it, the fact that autoplay doesn't seem to work in browsers is a thankful bonus.

From a personal standpoint, I seriously disliked it when pages loaded up and a video immediately began playing without my clicking to make it happen.

So the fact that many browsers are preventing it seems  (at least to me) to be a good move for users. 
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Paul

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+1 on no autoplay.  Autoplay is bad practice.  You can have no idea under what conditions a user is loading a page and will piss people off if, for example, the video autoplays in an inappropriate setting
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Joe Morgan

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Amen, no autoplay.It actually pecks away at smartphone users who have limited bandwidth plans.
Half the news videos are text with images and music these days.Which just aggravate the heck out of me. I can read much faster than the text they show you.
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kayakman, Champion

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I too despise auto-playing add-like videos that show on many web sites

but this forced no-auto-play behavior is a 2-edged sword

there are many instances where auto play is best; like when a viewer clicks on a go-to-URL hotspot to see a related video; forcing the user to click a 2nd time is burdensome  and disruptive
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Joe Morgan

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Well, sometimes you can't have your cake and eat it to.

Just how inconvenient is it to click that 1 time? Really, 1 click. Unless you have a handicap that makes it difficult to do.I don't think its a huge deal.

I know it's difficult to solve the mystery of the Tootsie Pop, theres just too many licks involved. LOL
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Paul

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The point is that it's incorrect for the content provider to dictate the consumption experience to the user.  It's their device, and good practice is to let THEM control how it works.  Being intrusive is unneighbourly.
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Rick Stone

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I also see Kayakman's point with the deep linking. That bit does seem silly to interrupt the pattern when linking directly to a specific time in a video.

Fortunately, creative folks are out there creating things like the browser extension that Kayakman mentioned he uses to overcome that limitation.

I certainly don't envy the folks that maintain the browser code. I'm sure in many cases it's a damned if you do and damned if you don't sort of situation.
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kayakman, Champion

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that "1 click" can become hundreds if a viewer is trying to sequence through 500 hotspoted images; or is trying quickly to scan through a set of related quick help tutorials

an unwanted auto-started video is easy to stop; but it's not so easy to resolve a situation where the viewer needs autoplay to work

I prefer to have my cake, and eat it too

I believe the browser community's reason for breaking auto play was to address unwanted ads; they have not accomplished that as best as I can tell; but they've sure messed up a bunch of my published tutorial work
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Joe Morgan

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Hey, if you want to disable autoplay blocking. Thats your choice is it not?

Perhaps one day, the browsers will take it upon themselves to police all the websites so to speak, and allow users to decide if they want to block or not block auto-play based on the website.
To me that sounds like a major burden to bestow on the browser with billions of websites. And unlikely to ever happen.
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kayakman, Champion

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browsers should enable autoplay control the way they now enable "mute site audio"; that would solve everyone's problems

but the current implementation is an intrusive solution that breaks a lot of good behaviors

the problem with the current re-enable autoplay method is that it is a "far-down'the-list" advanced browser option that most users have no idea exists;  way too opaque for prime time
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Joe Morgan

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Yeah well, the internet doesn't conform to a minority of people.
And I believe that's the bottom line. There really isn't many people uploading interactive content.
Not compared to the number of people subjected to auto-play videos.

Heck, interactive videos would barely tickle the needle. I'm thinking far less than 1% of all uploaded videos. Are interactive.Like a Camtasia video that is.
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kayakman, Champion

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I re-submit that the implementation re no-auto-play is improperly done; and why not enforced in Edge?

browsers [like Chrome] could/should set it up like they did for audio muting, and that would solve the issue for everyone, minority needs included; and ... that would keep control in the hands of the viewer

current implementation is a form of censorship; I prefer to make my own decisions

the original poster's question has been long ago answered
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Joe Morgan

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No,Chrome lets you unblock and allow auto-play.That's not censorship or anything like it.You have choices. chrome://flags/#autoplay-policy

Edge has settings as well.So if users enable blocking. It's going to behave like  Chrome.

I'm willing to bet those that love blocking, don't mind the extra click.Or, they are savvy enough in most cases.To change the setting temporarily, if its bothering them enough to do so.

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kayakman, Champion

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when browsers decided to set no auto play as a default, after allowing it since the beginning of time, that's censorship as far as I'm concerned; and how many viewers know about Chrome's flags settings?

and ... I'll submit that those who need autoplay really dislike blocking

we just have different opinions on the matter; let's leave it at that
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Joe Morgan

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I'll admit some elderly people are not very good with the internet.

I'm almost 60, I'm not in that group.
My 85 year old mother is not tech efficient, and couldn't care less to be quite honest.Extra clicks don't bother her.Shes just pleased to use her computer.

I don't think most people are as out of touch as you seem to suggest they are.Have been using computers for a very long time.And had no problem sorting out autoplay long ago, when it first became an issue.
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kayakman, Champion

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I did not suggest most people are out of touch

and simply tolerating extra clicks is irrelevant

I suspect if you stopped and asked 1,000 people on the street if they know how to sort out browser autoplay blocking, you'ed get a lot of stares and few, if any, answers

as I recall, autoplay's changed behaviors is a recent change in most browsers

the bottom line is that a lot of content is/was designed around autoplay working, including several thousand of my hosted videos; many of these now require viewers to click 2 play buttons; one imposed by the browser at t=0, and the 2nd, 2 seconds into the video; which was deliberately added as part of my start groups; and yes, there was/is a valid reason for that configuration

I do not think it good at all when any 3rd party [not the viewer] decides how things should be with someone else's intellectual property; it is, in fact, none of their business
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Paul

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Sorry, I was going to let this thread die but I have to challenge that assertion.  My playback device = my playback rules.  No one gets to dictate how I will consume my chosen content.  And if the provider imposes their will on me, I will choose to go elsewhere.  Simple as.
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kayakman, Champion

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if you're disagreeing with my assertion, possibly a misunderstanding?

some content is deliberately designed to be auto-played; and I assume you, the viewer, deliberately decides to view that content; if a browser blocks that behavior, then the browser imposes its will on you;  of course, if you know how, you can reset/change this; but it has to be done on a viewer-by-viewer basis; not at all intuitive, IMO

but if the browser control was as simple as it is now for audio muting [a browser tab control, site level], then that would probably work

the alternative for content producers who need auto-play is to specifically advise viewers to change their advanced browser settings before viewing; something I've found doesn't work in the real world

or, the content producer can accept the likely hood that that the viewer will probably get a degraded experience
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Joe Morgan

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It's not Your Browser kayakman.How much are you paying them? Not a penny Right?
It's Google's,expensive and complex to run. And therefore, very much their business.
 
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kayakman, Champion

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it's my content, and how it works is my business

for a browser to up and change the auto-play rules mid-stream is, IMO, wrong

how my content works has nothing to do with Google's, or for that matter, any other browser provider's  business

Edge's current implantation is the correct one , again, IMO

again, this discussion is way off track from the thread's initial perspective;  we should just end this
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Paul

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Agreed. :)
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Joe Morgan

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Heres the deal Paul, its a setting you can change. You're not forced to stay with Googles default setting.
The new default setting serves more people favorably than it harms. It just doesn't serve kayakman the way he would like.End of story.
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kayakman, Champion

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what part of "end this" do you not understand?
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Paul

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Yeah Joe, let it go.  I'm cool. :) :)
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Joe Morgan

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Well kayakman, perhaps you should urge your viewers to visit your website using another browser. If they have trouble viewing your content with fluidity.
Chrome has over 1 Billion users and dwarfs all other browsers.
If you want to end this, quit responding. 
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kayakman, Champion

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how do you up-front urge viewers to use a specific browser when they navigate to your sites on their own?

to end this now ridiculous dialog, stop making statements which demand a response

it seems you are insisting on making the last post in this thread; be my guest ...