How do I get a Wav file into Camtasia 8?

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I found a couple of nice audio options to add to a Camtasia file - But I have version 8 and it isn't an acceptable file type.  Any pointers on the best way - simple way to convert? 
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Michaelich

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Posted 7 months ago

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kayakman, Champion

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WAV audio files work just fine in CS8

they should be encoded at 44,100 khz; higher might not work
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Timbre4, Champion

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Hello,

All of my narrations have been WAV files in Camtasia since version 2 so this shouldn't be a problem.

1: Click on Import Media; 2: Browse to your WAV file; highlight it and click Open. 3: This adds it to your media bin. Then simply drag it onto a track in the timeline.

If the WAV file is not being accepted, something is goofy spec-wise or corrupt about that file. Try to import a different file as a test. I still have v8.6 on another PC so I'll grab the screen.

(Edited)
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rg

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Two notes -- and I learned both of these the hard way:
(1) 48kHz sampled WAV files will import, but if there is any overmodulation they will sound very crunchy.
(2) Some WAV files are non-standard in some way, and you have to convert them into a standard WAV file (e.g. via a program like Bigasoft). I noticed this with files created using Garage Band and with some WAV files that Adobe Premiere exported. I do not know what the parameters were which made these files nonstandard -- only that neither Roxio nor Camtasia could play them even though they played within Windows Media Player. After conversion -- which was nondestructive BTW -- both worked fine in Camtasia 8.
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Michaelich

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Appreciate the responses - but I still get an error message - I've tried several wav files from the same source - the source being the place we want to use.   Error message states - "Cannot load file.  It is either unsupported media type or required codecs are not found"  

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kayakman, Champion

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open the WAV files in free Audacity, and export them as 44,100 wav; use in project; does that work?
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Michaelich

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Actually.  A colleague assisted me with this.  My quick fix is to  drop the wav file into my Adobe Media Encoder, which I have, and converted to an mp3 44,100 which is working for me.  I just hadn't had the occasion to use it as of yet.   
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rg

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I recommend against converting to MP3; export from Audacity as a new WAV file at 44.1kHz and you will not end up introducing new audio artifacts.

MP3 is -- by definition (literally, in how it is defined) -- a lower resolution than WAV.  This means that if you make an MP3 file you are "degrading" the audio; when you output from Camtasia you will alter the audio yet again.

If a file appears to be nonstandard, changing how it is "wrapped" is often the best solution.  To minimize audio or video problems resulting from re-encoding a data stream, the best practice is to make a nondestructive re-packaging of the source file.

In other words, using a program that re-"wraps" the audio without changing it will always be superior to using a program that re-encodes the audio into a different format.  Not long ago I had to do this with some MOV files that arrived from an older Sony XD camera -- basically, I had to re-wrap them so that they were more "acceptable" to Camtasia.  They still said they were MOV files, but now they opened up.
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Michaelich

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Appreciate those pointers.


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erip982

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Just a comment but why would you want to import a .wav file instead of converting to an mp3? The file size advantage you gain by converting to mp3 will make manipulating/previewing your project much easier. If you convert in audacity as suggested previously, make sure you choose a variable bit rate, not fixed. If its quality you are interested in, an mp3 can be converted from .wav in 320 bit rate - but really 160 or less should be fine. 
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Rick Stone

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Out of curiosity, why are you recommending the variable bit rate? I'm no audio expert, but it seems I've seen elsewhere in this forum that variable bit rates cause issues when trying to synchronize videos and what is recommended is a constant bit rate.

But hey ho, I learn new things every day.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Timbre4, Champion

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I had the same thought.
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rg

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Why import a WAV file?  It is higher quality than an MP3 made from the WAV file., so you end up retaining audio fidelity better, until that final output.

Similarly, why do a variably bit rate?  Constant bit rate is superior if you want to ensure quality and avoid introducing errors.  CBR takes up more space and -- in a streaming environment places a greater demand on the connection.  But inside the editing system or running from a DVD, CBR typically will be more reliable than VBR.
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Solodeji

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I do not know what the parameters were which made these files nonstandard -- only that neither Roxio nor Camtasia could play them even though they played within Windows Media Player...
(Edited)
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rg

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I had the same situation, and I used the inexpensive Bigasoft converter when I received nonstandard WAV files.  It re-packaged the WAV files with no quality degradation and Camtasia (and Roxio!) both played them perfectly after conversion.
(Edited)