How do I reduce graininess

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Original video of live concert used digital zoom producing graininess when not focused very well. Would appreciate suggestions for reducing graininess/masking it. Have tried a bit of color to mask it, but... Your advice much appreciated.

Thanks,
Gerry
 
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izniznot

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Posted 9 months ago

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davemillman

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Cut to other video, stills of the band or some other graphic during the bad parts.
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izniznot

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Good idea if possible. I have noticed that by using the color effect for a little drama, it sort of distracts from the graininess; it's a short promo video. One link I found suggests staying away from blue as that tends to appear grainier than other colors and that suits me just fine.

Thanks,
Gerry
 
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Joe Morgan

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What davemillman said,

You need a program that supports a plug-in like Red Giants Denoiser III to deal with film grain. https://www.redgiant.com/products/magic-bullet-denoiser/

The technology is pricey and so is the software that runs it. But it works great.

I can't speak for the free alternatives.I'm sure they do a fair to decent job. I doubt there anything to write home about.But I could be wrong? There are several available for Windows users.http://www.ilovefreesoftware.com/28/windows/video-software/free-video-denoise-software-windows.html

As usual, Mac users seem to have been looked over in this department.  
At least, I couldn't find one for MAC. Maybe you know a Windows user or have access to a Windows computer and could process your footage that way?

Regards,Joe
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davemillman

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Red Giants Denoiser III that Joe Morgan linked above is available for Mac. But if we read the original post: 

Original video of live concert used digital zoom producing graininess when not focused very well. 
My guess is the problem will not be improved much by Red Giants Denoiser III. It sounds like the original image quality is low because of both poor focus and extreme digital zoom.

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izniznot

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Thanks for the Red Giant Denoiser suggestion. I'll try it during a trial with Final Cut Pro and report back, perhaps with a link to before & after video.

Happy Holidays,
Gerry
 
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Joe Morgan

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Well, I happen to have Red Giant Denoiser III.

So I decided to post some examples of what it could do. I quickly discovered I didn’t have any footage with a lot of grain to work with. So I shot some brief footage of my dog. Who doesn’t appreciate having cameras pointed at her.

With only one overhead compact fluorescent light bulb on in the room. I knew the footage would come out grainy. I was using a Nikon D 3300 DSLR with a 35mm 1.8 lens. Being a lowlight lens the grain was not as bad as I’d hoped for. Plus, with a low depth of field. The dog is in focus and the background is blurred. A great cinematic look, but not ideal for this test.

That being said, in the images below you will see a still frame of that footage with denoiser applied, and the same without. The background is my Dell computer tower and the blue LED lights are docking bays for external hard drives.

You'll need to click on these and view them at 100% resolution to see the grain well.

Original



Denoiser Applied


Because that footage wasn’t grainy enough for a reasonable demonstration. My dog, Freedom is her name. Who didn’t appreciate being filmed the first time around. Moved to another location. I put a 18 to 55 millimeter 3.5 to 5.6 stock lens that came with the camera on for the next shooting. This gave me more of the grain that I was looking for. Same room, same lighting. Just a different location.

These next images are at 100 percent zoom level exported directly out of Premier Pro. I didn’t apply any color correction or anything like that. This is strictly what happens when Red Giant Denoiser gets its hands on it.





And finally, these two images are the same footage zoomed in at 200 percent.



For some perspective and my personal take on this. Consider what is actually going on here. Everyone knows or has heard the term that someone has been Photoshopped.

That’s the art of taking an image of someone. Utilizing any given number of available tools in Photoshop. Smoothing lines and wrinkles in people’s faces, cleaning up their blemishes and things of this nature. Tools like the healing brush are fantastic for blemishes and wrinkles as they re-create the surrounding pixels automatically. But it’s not a flawless process, so you may have to resort to the clone stamp tool or something along that line to achieve the desired result.

So that brings us back to Red Giant Denoiser. When you ask Red Giant Denoiser to remove film grain from your footage.

 You’re asking it to analyze every pixel of every frame. Replace every damaged pixel with one of the correct color and tone. That matches its surrounding. Including filling in fine details like a dogs hair. If you really think about it, that’s quite a process.

Myself personally, I wouldn’t want to clean up even 1 of those frames in Photoshop.

I have a high-powered CPU. i7-4770 processor 3.40 GHz (8M Cache, up to 3.9 GHz)

A strong GPU. NVIDIA GeForce GTX 660 1.5GB GDDR5 EA. A stronger GPU would help me with rendering speed.

It takes a mountain of computer resources to make this process play out. I rendered a 22 second video of before and after footage.

I wasn’t watching the clock but it took roughly 15 or 20 minutes to render this 1920 by 1080 video. Only 11 seconds of it have the filter applied. That’s how hard the filter has to think to do its job. I can tell you this as well, it’s much faster than Red Giant Denoiser II.

Under normal circumstances I would consider the original footage below junk footage. More worthy of being discarded, then anything else. Between Lumetri Color and some other filters I could make the footage look better than it does. But it’s still less than ideal.

The dogs in the process of shedding an old coat of fur. So don’t confuse all the Tuffs of fur in her coat with film damage.

But we all know why I’m here. So here’s the end result and the original footage. I suggest you click on the Vimeo link so you can watch it at 100 percent resolution. I doubt you can get a true view of the film grain in the small player on this webpage.



The corrected footage is not perfect. If you pause it while playing. You’ll be able to find some frames that didn’t clean up as well as others. That’s why I brought the Photoshop analogy into this picture. The fact that the process works at all is quite an achievement.

For what it’s worth, that’s my perspective on the issue.

Regards, Joe






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davemillman

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Joe,

Thanks for doing this! Your Vimeo example tells the whole story. Nicely done.