how do i remove breathing sounds in camtasia 9?

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Isn't there an automatic way to cut out ums and breathing in Camtasia 9?
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schzade0

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Posted 8 months ago

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paulwilliamengle

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I’m 99% sure this functionality is not present in any of the Camtasia products, and it’s not a feature I’m aware of being present in three Digital Audio Workstation/audio editors I’ve used: Reaper, Audacity or Audition.

Waves makes an audio effect plugin that can identify and isolate breaths for you to remove, but I am not aware of an “um” identifier.

If removing ums and breaths sounds are important to you, I think there are a few approaches you can take:

- write out the script so that you use fewer filler words like “ums”
- if you prefer a spontaneous, unscripted approach, you might try using a dog clicker to click when you breathe or use a filet word - this will create a visual “marker” in your wave form that makes finding these edits and making them easier.
- if the two suggestions don’t work, either go through the audio and make manual edits.
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Ed Covney

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Camtasia does have an audio effect "Noise Removal" but it lacks an ability to sample the noise you want to remove - so it reduce all low-level audio. Try it first. Select your entire audio track, then click "Audio Effects" then click  "Noise Removal".

If not satisfactory, even using Pro Audio editing software (Audacity - free), nothing is automatic. You have to sample the noise you want removed then apply the sample to the entire audio track. Plenty of You Tube tutorials can get you through the process.
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paulwilliamengle

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Edit: if it doesn’t sample a noise print, then my point below doesn’t stand.

Hey Ed, my understanding is that noise removal is looking to examine offending frequencies and subtract them from your audio. I dunno that you’d want to sample speech as it’d pull out a lot of the wanted frequencies from the speaker’s voice.
(Edited)
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Ed Covney

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" . . I dunno that you’d want to sample speech . ."
Ideally, you'll want find a three or four seconds of just the breathing (normal respiratory rate is 15-20/minute = 3 or 4 seconds) and no voice. If you use a full cycle of breathing as the "noise" sample, s/w can use the sample to remove the sample plus all repetitions on the audio track. I did a lot of this when I transferred all my vinyls to digital.
That's not what Camtasia does - it assumes any audio at -40dbm (a guess) or lower is noise and reduces it -20db (another guess). Any noise above audio above -40db (a repeated guess) remains unaffected.
Noise is not = "offending frequencies", it's the sample I provide that I want s/w to eliminate for me. It contains lots of frequencies that are unique or shared by speakers voice.

Unfortunately, I never had Camtasia until years after I did all my audio work. I still do some like the 1994 Shawshank Redemption soundtrack. Remember when Robbins was playing the LP to the yard? It was from a German opera ("The Marriage Of Figaro", a duet by Edith Mathis & Gundula Janowitz) also from 1994. The producers of the  sound track "added" the noise to make it sound like an old scratchy LP. And what s/w can add to audio, I can easily correct with  other s/w. 
Actually, in the time it took to respond to your post I could have eliminated schzade0's breathing noise - and if that person is paying attention, sen me the sound track, I'll edit it for you. Gmail con only handle file< 20MB. (ed(dot)covney(at)gmail(dot)com.


(Edited)
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David B. Demyan

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This is all so very inconvenient, but I do all audio recording in Audacity, then edit that timeline before importing. But I'm after professional results, so it's worth the extra time to get it right. This works especially well for breath intake because they show up on the audio timeline as a shape that looks like a flattened football; or maybe not so flat, depending on the intensity of the breath.

My best practice for pro-sounding audio: use a professional microphone, a studio or other method of deadening sound in the room, and Audacity or Audition to record it. You will have fewer "ums" and breaths if you start with a written script, rehearse it until your are very familiar with what you are going to cover, then either set the script aside and record it or keep the script handy for a reminder if you need it. Your deliver will sound much smoother with fewer speech flaws. And when you are done recording and editing out the remaining flaws, save your audio file in uncompressed format like .WAV. Import that file into Camtasia and match the visuals with your new, clean audio.
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