How do i reverse videos in camtasia 9?

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i want to reverse my videos in camtasia 9 and i dont know how please help
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vexdestroyer123

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Posted 12 months ago

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afrohlich

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Do you mean reverse as in mirror image? Just go on properties for the video you want to reverse, select the rotation about Y axis control and select to rotate 180 degrees.
I hope this is what you were looking for.
Alex
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vexdestroyer123

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not as an mirror image no
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Rick Stone

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You might also want to check out this thread.

Click here to view

Cheers... Rick :)
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Rick Stone

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Kayakman has some videos with different techniques that may be helpful. 

This one is for version 8 but may be helpful for version 9. Click here
Another approach. Click here
And yet another. Click here
Others have suggested using different software to accomplish it.

Cheers... Rick :)
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simone

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I wonder why it is not available in Camtasia. It seems that it would be an easy feature to apply. I use Filmora from Wondershare and this feature is available. Filmora is also less expensive and has more features than Camtasia. For example in Filmora you can click apply transitions to all and you have them automatically applied to all. It has way more transitions available than Camtasia. Green screen is available, speeding up a clip is available and can easy be applied to all as well. Just to name a few features. I purchased both programs and so far I still prefer to use Filmora over Camtasia.
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Joe Morgan

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I too would like to see more features in Camtasia.
However, you have a bit of an Apples and Oranges comparison to consider.

Camtasia has the most versatile screen recorder available.Plus it's quality is first class. Filmora doesn't record your screen.

Camtasia is primarily an interactive video creation tool. For education and commercial use.To create tutorials complete with quizzes. Website use, etc.
It can be used for standard video editing, and does a good job.
But it wasn't created as a typical video editor. With a lot of special effects, bells and whistles.That's why it's lacking  the features typical  editors possess.

Regards,Joe 
(Edited)
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simone

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Thanks for your reply to my post. I know about the screen recording feature. I have not used it as I have already a screen recorder, but I assume that it works great. One could argue that it is a separate program and I was only referring to the "video editor" The only question that I have is, why not offer the best product that you can offer to appeal for a wider range of clients?  But this is something for the creators of this program to decide if it is worth to go from "ok product" to outstanding. 
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Joe Morgan

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So Simone,

I took a look over the program Filmora. It seems like a pretty nice program.


I would liken it to a program that is more geared towards film looks than anything else. Most people in the film industry equate the term film looks to a lot of the types of filters that Filmora has. The ones that change the hues, overall color tones, shading, etc. I see there are number of effects like mosaics, video wall, emboss and some of the other standard filters that most video editors offer. I see there’s a tab where you can spend more money and buy extra special-effects.

Here’s one thing I didn’t like about the program. The video quality in the playback window is horrendous. I even pre-rendered the timeline and the video quality didn’t improve. I cannot edit footage that looks that blurry and pixilated. It’s simply not in my DNA to tolerate that type of editing environment. It can actually aid in smoother timeline playback. But when the video is paused the image needs to be sharp. With Filmora, they don’t even give you a sharp image when paused.



And here’s Camtasia’s canvas area by comparison.



As far as Camtasia expanding into the everyday video editing market goes. I used to think very much like you do. However, in my opinion. It would be quite a leap to develop FX effects for Camtasia and film looks. Not if you’re talking about doing all of this within TechSmith’s walls. Meaning that they would have to rely on plug-ins to offer these effects. Finding plug-ins that mesh seamlessly with Camtasia would probably be quite a challenge. Odds are, I’m thinking there wouldn’t be any available. I use Adobe’s Premier Pro and After Effects with some pricey plug-ins. There pricey because they do work seamlessly and well within these programs. To Filmora’s credit, it appears they didn’t rely on any plug-ins to create their special-effects.

Corel video studio is a perfect example of what happens when you create a low price video editing program with a lot of special-effects. It is built virtually on the backs of plug-ins. Some of the plug-ins they offer are very nice.

However, because these are plug-ins that don’t mesh well with the program. Practically every applied effect opens a new preview window. Plus, these preview windows don’t know or display what’s occurring in the main video.

 If you have more than one special-effect applied. These windows are oblivious to the effects applied by other pop up windows. In the example below I’m applying a 3D title filter to a video. The actual video appears on the left-hand side. There is a pan and zoom filter applied and a rain filter. If you look in the title preview window you won’t see any rain. Plus, you won’t see the zoom in effect that was applied either.

If you look in the main window you don’t see the title being applied. This leaves you having no idea what the title will actually look like until you apply it. Leaving you with a workflow that is counterproductive.



So here’s the title applied. Now you see the title is way too large due to the pan and zoom effect.

 
So this is an exaggeration of an error you would encounter. But this is what happens in smaller doses all the time. You have no idea what to expect from one pop up window to the next.

 If you’re working with color filters applied to the video, it would be very difficult to get the color tones of the title to mesh with the color filter. If you’re only working with one filter Corel isn’t so bad. If your new to video editing, Corel can lull you into thinking you own one whale of a program. I started video editing with Ulead studio which became Corel video studio. It was a good place to start, a good place to get your feet wet. But it’s also one of those programs you have to unlearn as you advance in the video editing field. So it’s a double-edged sword.

With all the video editors out there. I’ve got to wonder how profitable it would be in the long run for Camtasia to expand into the every day video editing market. At the very least they would have to dump X amount of money into the program to bring it up to that next level. Then, what would the new price be? And would people really be attracted to Camtasia at this new higher price?

Regards, Joe

(Edited)
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simone

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Hi Joe,

I am not saying that Filmora doesn't have its flaws. (I do have a computer that is fast enough for me to work with Filmora) But Filmora definitely has more capabilities that can be easily applied into a video. The work area is adjustable in size and I can make it as big as you show Camtasia's work area. (I think)



To add text a separate window does show and you can play the text with the frame that is selected. I did never have a problem that I can not see how it will be displayed in the video.



I am not familiar with Corel so I can not comment on that. I am really not saying that Camtasia is a bad product, but it is missing some key features that in my humble opinion would not be that costly to add. Keep in mind that every company needs to improve the products the currently offer in order to stay competitive in a vast changing market. If a product can appeal to a wider audience they would sell more and make more money that should cover the development cost. 
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Joe Morgan

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 To create new features from scratch would require quite a bit of work.
I was merely using Corel as an example.Showing what can happen when you take shortcuts to get there.
The way I see it.TechSmith makes a profit where their at now. So unless the investment for development pays off, the price has to go up.
I could see it paying off and becoming very profitable in the long run.I don't disagree with you there.

 Camtasia's core customers are tutorial creators,educators, etc. Most of them don't require special effects.Probably wouldn't want to pay more for them either. So I think it's a  gamble for TechSmith to jump into the ring.
I meant it when I said Filmora seems like a nice program. I just can't work with low resolution preview windows. It makes applying masks and other elements with precision impossible. That and I don't like looking at blurry footage if I don't have to. 

I'm not saying your wrong, I'm just saying what I think "Or what I'm guessing" the reason TechSmith hasen't added similar features for so long. They've been requested by users  for years.
Anyway, Cheers, Joe