How do you create HD DVD files? I still haven't been able to work that out. Does anyone know how to do this?

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I keep getting pixelated videos and not sure how to get HD DVDs.
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Rik

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Posted 4 years ago

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Timbre4, Champion

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What do you mean by HD DVDs? Do you mean high quality? Camtasia is designed to output file formats in compressed formats such as mp4 for placement on websites for the most part. If you are making DVDs and wish to preserve maximum video quality (720P) you may be barking up the wrong tree.
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Rik

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Thank you Timbre4, yes, that's exactly what I'm trying to do. Could you suggest what software I need to create High Definition DVDs - movie quality?
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Timbre4, Champion

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Sir - it would really depend on 1) what your source material is, 2) level of editing sophistication and effects desired and 3) output options DVD 720P, Blu Ray 1080P, etc.)

Caveat: I am a Camtasia devotee for over 10 years for making instructional and sales videos. Having said that, if you Google 'SONY video editing software' you would find options that range from $50 to $500 for example.

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Joe Morgan

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Are you trying to use your computers standard DVD burner to create full HD DVD’s?

There is a way to burn 720 or 1080 HD video to a standard DVD disk.

This will also require a Blu-Ray Player for playback. DVD players have a maximum resolution of 480i with an aspect ratio of 4:3. So when 720 HD televisions came out. DVD players became pretty much obsolete. They have the ability to upscale to 720, but that can give you pixilation and a soft image quality.   

Your original source footage would need to be HD as Timber alluded to in his previous post. Then, you would convert that footage to AVCHD. Camtasia cannot render AVCHD video but it can render HD video. There are a number of ways to convert and burn the video. If you Google “Covert video to AVCHD” you will find many options.

 The video would also need to be short in duration “20 minutes or less in most cases” The file size will dictate how much you can burn to disk. I’m talking less than 8.5 GB for a double layer recordable disk.  4.7 GB when burning to a Standard DVD. So this is a pretty restrictive option.

Hopefully, this is what you were trying to do. Or I’m just spinning my wheels here. I do that sometimes. LOL

Regards, Joe

(Edited)
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Rik

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Thank you so much Joe. I think we're almost on the same page. I'm not sure if it's possible, but I'm wanting to produce 1 hour long High Definition DVDs that can be played on most DVD players similar to the movies you buy. I shot the footage on a Canon XA20 in HD mode and most people will be watching these on big screens. I'm not sure if what I'm trying to do is possible I guess as I'm a newbie to Camtasia Studio.
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Joe Morgan

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Glad I could help.
You need to be thinking about Blu-Ray  players and Blu-Ray disks if you want an hour of HD footage on 1 disk. It cannot be done on the old technology DVD players. I suspect most people that own big screen HDTV's, have already upgraded to a Blu-Ray player.
The video would still need to be rendered in the AVCHD format. So you cannot export from Camtasia in AVCHD. But you CAN export from Camtasia in HD and convert that video to AVCHD. Then a Camtasia produced video could still be used to accomplish what you are trying to do.
You also need a Blu-Ray burner to burn the disk.  
(Edited)
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Timbre4, Champion

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The key things are preserving the original resolution and what your audience can play. Here are a few clarifications on output options. You can render your footage project at DVD (720P) level and create a disc that everybody with a DVD player can play. That is the safest bet.

We shot a lot of stuff at AVCHD (1440P) quality with our Canon that looked great. AVCHD can be burned onto cheaper DVD blanks but MUST be played on a Blu Ray player as a DVD player won't recognize it. Then of course Blu-ray (1080p) all the way IF you know people have players.

Frankly, I think you'd be going down to a garden hose here when you really need a 2 inch water pipe. DVD Architect (SONY) allows you to make the disc menu generically or with graphics you bring in. If you've never done this before, it can be daunting. Use products intended to handle what you have.

BTW - "HD DVD" is a deaf format; it was defeated by Blu-ray as high definition disc format.

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Mr. Tom

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Rik--I answered a similar question in another thread. There is no such thing as a high definition DVD. DVD is a standard definition format. If your source material is high def, it will be downscaled to standard def when burned to a DVD. High def material goes onto a Blu-Ray disc.
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Joe Morgan

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Hey Rik,
I was at my dentist thinking about this further and will expand on this topic..
My LG Blu-Ray Player can play Mp4's that require no conversion at all. I can even plug in a USB stick with an Mp4 and play it. Or burn a Mp4 to disk and use it. I suspect all newer Blu-Ray players can do this. That player is about 2 years od now. So there really is a number of options. It depends on the equipment available to the person wishing to view the content.

You can even upload content to You-Tube, Vimeo, and some other sites for people that can connect to the internet through their HDTV through Wi-Fi. It's common software installed on the majority of HDTV's produced today.

 I agree with you Mr. Tom.
DVD Players can only upscale a video to 720 through the player.

The max resolution of a DVD player is actually 720 x 480  using the NTSB format.

1280 X 720 is the standard resolution of a 720 HDTV.

For the PAL format it's slightly better. 720 x 575 . I don't know why? 
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/DVD-Video
(Edited)
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Timbre4, Champion

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DVD players are 720p capable and the upscaling of commercial video at least, is to 1080p (not bad but not the real thing).

You were likely referring to NTSC (Novocain has been shown to impact typing) :)

Sharing it up to YouTube (720p) may be the simplest solution (most won't notice or care) and potentially make a Blu-ray disc for himself and those who are so equipped.



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Joe Morgan

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Not trying to doubt you, but I do. That's why I posted the Wikipedia  Link.

Who makes one? I'd love to download the owners manual and see it for myself. I can't find anybody else that supports your claims. Search  E-How, Google search, etc.
I ditched my DVD player as soon as I got my HDTV for that very reason.
(Edited)
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Timbre4, Champion

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Denon alone offered a dozen models such as this one that I've owned and recommended to friends in the past. It's not an uncommon thing.

Wikipedia is okay for many things - a comprehensive technical resource it is not.

 

(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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It will upscale low quality DVD's. But it doesn't change a standard DVD's native resolution. Plus, it's not a standard DVD player by any stretch of the imagination.

 Unless you've got old televisions and low resolution DVD's around the house. I can't imagine why anyone would invest 200$ on this thing? I don't see how this player helps Ric with his problem at all.

My old 720p Plasma can receive and display native 1080p video.
For 200$ I would go with a Blu-Ray player. I paid 125$ for mine and it works great. Plays Mp4's and even plays video from a flash drive.
This is all about the equipment and has nothing to do with the native resolution of a DVD disk player.

Regards, Joe
(Edited)
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Timbre4, Champion

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Disclaimer: Apologies to other Ric and other readers for this tangent. This will be my last post. Moderators feel free to excise all of it.

A DVD is a DVD; it is authored to a set of worldwide disc specifications. There is no low quality or standard settings like VHS tape speeds. The quality and options may vary disc to disc but the spec is always the same as seen by the player.

Players like these have the ability to "upconvert" a standard DVD (720P) output thru scaling techniques to 1080i (component) or 1080p (HDMI) output to match the display's capabilities. You can buy a Sony DVD player that performs this for $35.00. I can get the Denon example (also plays SACD & DVD-A discs) for $75.00 now.

1080P HD signals - will be displayed as 1080p only on a capable display panel. All others will be down-converted according to display available: 1080i (interlaced) panel will display as 1080i, 720p panel will display 720p, 480i (CRT TV with converter box) will display as 480i.

That's just the way it is ~ Bruce Hornsby

No harm intended, let's move on.



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Joe Morgan

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I don't see how a lively conversation does any harm or warrants an apology.

Challenging the findings of one another can and should be beneficial in the long run. 
I strive to give the best advice I have to offer at all times. So if what I'm hearing doesn't make sense to me. I question it. So I will know better, and always will.

Regards, Joe
(Edited)
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Timbre4, Champion

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There's a good man, thanks for your reply.
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Joe Morgan

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Thanks for yours as well. No animosity intended. {: >)
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Robert R., Online Community Admin

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Hey all!

Just wanted to thank you all for the rock-solid conversation; we love seeing these types of conversations!

One thing to note is "DVD" here can be formatted for various purposes. You can absolutely place a 1080p MP4 file on that disc and put it into a modern HDTV-connected DVD player and have it play back at 1080p. There are two catches; the first catch is that you need to finalize the physical disc as a Data DVD and the second catch is that your DVD player must be able to support the Data DVD and file format that you put on it. As long as it's connected via HDMI it should play 1080p. This is a less-common way of doing things and is very dependent on the viewer's hardware (i.e. DVD player).

The commonly accepted concept of "Create HD DVDs" is one where a DVD authoring tool is used to create the DVD (thus separating the audio and video streams into _TS folders, this is the way that mass-produced DVDs you buy from the store are formatted). In these cases, for a Region 1 DVD (NTSC) your resolution will be 720x480, or rather 480p. An upconvert DVD player will "stretch" that smaller video to match the output settings of the Upconvert DVD player - in most cases that is 1080i (which could be debated as lower-quality than 720p) though some of the upconvert machines out there may top out at 720p. This method of "burning a DVD" is common, though requires additional software (DVD Authoring Tool) such as Adobe Encore.

If you are looking for a way to create "HD" physical media and have it be "true HD" you will need to have a BluRay disc burner and the appropriate Authoring Tool. This will allow a user to burn "HD" content to the BluRay and have a BluRay player play it back at high definition resolutions.

Hope that helps!

P.S. "HD" is one of those designations that seems to be tossed around a lot without actually knowing what it actually means in the computing world. For those that want to know, "HD" is content that is viewed commonly at 1280x720 (720p) or 1920x1080 (1080p). There are new and emerging resolutions such as 4k (2160p or 3840x2160) which is the successor to the short-lived 1440p resolution (though this resolution is picking back up in the mobile market).
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Rik

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Thank you so much Robert. That is so insightful and helpful.

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