How Much Are Those Fancy Features Worth?

  • 4
  • Idea
  • Updated 1 year ago
When asking for a new feature, I think it would be a good idea to include how much you would be willing to pay for the feature.

Camtasia has always been an affordable, (especially for educators) screen recording tool with quite nice editing capabilities. Best of all, Camtasia has historically been user-friendly enough for just about anyone to use.

Lately I am seeing quite a few requests for the bells and whistles available in high end, specialized (much more expensive with a very steep learning curve) video editing and effects software. I don't think Camtasia is intended to be a replacement for video editing software like Premiere Pro and Final Cut, or to create motion graphics and visual effects like After Effects. Those are totally different tools on very different platforms.

I also have CC 2017 (that includes Premiere and After Effects). The CC software all lacks screen recording capabilities. (You'll often find Adobe CC forums recommending Camtasia for screencasts)

I can't say enough how much I hope Camatasia continues on as the "anyone can" tool it has been for the almost 10 years I have been using it and recommending it to my colleagues in higher education. It fills a unique niche very nicely. I sincerely hope Tech Smith doesn't ever let Camtasia stray too far from those roots.
Photo of susannemistric

susannemistric

  • 100 Posts
  • 76 Reply Likes
  • hopeful

Posted 1 year ago

  • 4
Photo of Jigs Gaton, Consultant

Jigs Gaton, Consultant

  • 65 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
I'd give a buck for a keyboard nudge for the timeline. But seriously, the idea of paying for each feature is nuts. The problem you describe is serious, however. I've been doing freelance videos for 30 years, and for the whatever reason, vids with screen recordings is taking up half my time (or more) nowadays. Everyone wants them.

It's a conundrum. If I have to do a project with screen recordings, I'd rather not fire up Premiere CC or worse, Final Cut X. Camtasia is a decent enough editor, but just needs a few more features like frame-by-frame nudge and "updated media on the timeline from the media bin" to become a true replacement NLE. Its like they are almost there, but not quite. 

Final Cut + Motion is 350$, while Camtasia is 200$ and the quality differences between the software is stark. If Apple where to just integrate screen recording into both those apps, I think I'd be gone. If Camtasia would just make a few improvements, I'd stay. 
Photo of s.frandsen

s.frandsen, Employee

  • 32 Posts
  • 4 Reply Likes
Hey Jiggy!

If you are wanting to move the playhead forward or backward one frame at a time, I think the comma and period hotkeys do what you are asking for.

Sydney
Photo of training

training

  • 118 Posts
  • 41 Reply Likes
I was thinking the same thing after receiving these last floods of TechSmith emails. I noticed how many things were being requested and my first thought was that it was going to price itself out of my range. I had no idea that Final Cut price had dropped that much. I paid an exorbitant amount when it first came out, and paid more than the current Final Cut price for the next upgrade. I just stopped upgrading. But rather than pay the same for Camtasia, I'd like to keep Camtasia cost down and maybe get Final Cut or Premier and have them both.
(Edited)
Photo of training

training

  • 118 Posts
  • 41 Reply Likes
I hope we're also comparing the value of the Mac version. 
Photo of Jigs Gaton, Consultant

Jigs Gaton, Consultant

  • 65 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
@training: I don't consider bundling the Mac and PC version as much of a value-add, unless it's actually two separate independent licenses, which I don' think it is. It's not like I am going to create videos on a PC one day and then a Mac the next day.  All my Macs run Windows using Parallels anyway.  Now, I've noticed there are some things that work better on a PC... maybe more features... dunno, but if that's true, Camtasia is just covering their butt, and that's not helping my bottom line. 
(Edited)
Photo of training

training

  • 118 Posts
  • 41 Reply Likes
@Jiggy Gaton, I don't recall suggesting the two platforms merge. I just see all these comments about Camtasia 9 and wanted to ensure that the Mac version suggestions were also being thought about in terms of cost. This isn't just about Windows users. 
Photo of Jigs Gaton, Consultant

Jigs Gaton, Consultant

  • 65 Posts
  • 12 Reply Likes
@ training: I thought you were saying to count the fact that they are now bundled, I think they are, right? U get both for $199, no? These days I could care less if an App is Windows or MacOS, all my Macs run both both platforms equally as well. 
(Edited)
Photo of training

training

  • 118 Posts
  • 41 Reply Likes
@Jiggy Gaton. That's not what I'm saying at all. Please re-read my simple statement as it is and don't read anything else into it. The word "also" singles out the Mac version. If I'd meant bundled, I would have said bundled. I hope we don't get a flood of emails now about merging the two. I'm sick of going through them thinking there might be something new I should consider. 
(Edited)
Photo of David D

David D, Technical Product Manager - Camtasia

  • 139 Posts
  • 159 Reply Likes
@susannemistric thanks for the post. Staying user friendly for just about everyone is still a core to what Camtasia is about. We like to say a "video creation program for professionals that make video" vs "video creation tool for video professionals"
Photo of brianmt68

brianmt68

  • 26 Posts
  • 8 Reply Likes
Camtasia is great as a recording and presentation software.  Trying to compete with an traditonal NLE may not be a good move. Two different end goals. Create simple well designed graphics instead of hundreds of library assets that are cheesy.  

More isn't better.  Increase speed and stability before you add more features. Someone mentioned the other day about adding an actual audio meter not just one where you check your levels at the start.  Great idea. Simple change that can make the users audio easier to monitor.  Drop the color correction features and add something that makes the editing process faster. Allow the user to adjust simple things like brightness and contrast. Shadows and highlights.

Ability to correct an over exposed or under exposed shot. Sometimes video is to far gone to fix but much of the time it's within a  range of acceptability.  Instead of  a "colorize " slider , add a few presets that can be added to Webcam footage. Much of the time people looked washed out or the skin tones are unfavorable.  A preset that allows a person to look better is going to be more useful than 100 new checker board dissolves.  
Photo of wendy.hamilton

wendy.hamilton, TechSmith CEO

  • 52 Posts
  • 37 Reply Likes
Thanks for this post, it's an interesting and useful conversation. 

A lot of customers on this forum take the time to be on this forum because they are power users, they may even be professional screencast producers.  Power users spend a lot of their time creating video and are often extremely familiar with third party products, more complex/expensive/feature-rich products.  And while we value the voice of our power users, we appreciate the recognition in this thread that our customer base as a whole tends to be more novice/casual than the customer base of certain competitors.  Many of our users may only create video a couple times a year, and while that video may be of high value to them it's still a small part of their overall day job.  They value a simpler learning curve and a single interface to accomplish the task.  It's a tough balance for product management who is trying to serve both audiences, but of course most software companies have this challenge to some extent.