How to fix bloating video size after audio editing?

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Hi all,
I am facing a problem with using Camtasia studio 7. I have a video file (avi, 20 minutes, about 330 Mbs in size), into which I want to add an audio track which I have in a regular mp3 file (57 seconds long, 902 Kbs or so in size). Here is what I do:

1) In video timeline, split original audio into 2 parts.
2) Silence the part I want to replace
3) Add the new audio to it.

The problem arises when saving the new video file. The resulting video gets bloated from its initial size to a whopping 34.2 GBS. Apparently it happens because of the bitrate - file properties show a 224637 Kbps bitrate for the video and 1536 Kbps for the audio. I do not see any settings that I may be altering to cause this. The audio quality also seems to suffer a bit in the end result, becoming slightly quiteter and less clear.

So I need to know, how can I save the video so that it retains its orignial properties (or as close as possible to them) and the quality doesn't get hurt?

Any help will be highly appreciated!
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Daz454

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Posted 2 years ago

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ExpertNovice

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Your file properties verify my initial supposition.  The production is using VERY high settings.

I no longer have CS7 installed but the correction should be easy to follow.

Change either the Video settings, Audio settings, or both.  Lower them.  The settings you should use depend on what you are producing.  E.g. If producing a symphony the sound settings should be higher than if producing a narrator the same holds true if producing an HD nature video vs a screen capture.

You can search for suggestions or take your current project and make a copy.  Eliminate all but 10 or 20 or seconds of the video and save it with the current settings.  Then, drastically lower the settings and reproduce.  Compare the quality and size against the first and then determine what you want.  Of course, the shortened video allows much faster productions!

Good luck.

PS.  If any of the experts gives different advice, listen to them first!

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Daz454

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Hi there,

Thank you for your answer! Unfortunately, I'm new to Camtasia, so I'm having trouble figuring out specifically which audio/video settings I should edit. Is something after pressing "Produce and share"? There seem to be a few settings that I could edit, but they all seem to be where they should, 704x528 video resolution, stereo sound at 187 Kb/s.
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ExpertNovice

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Yes, the settings are found after clicking Produce and Share and before production, as shown below.

Again, what you are producing (narrator vs symphony) has an impact on your choices as does the equipment to be played back on (old TV or the latest HD (whatever) TV).  Having that information may help others to make suggestions.

My limited knowledge suggests 187 for a high quality audio production to MP4 is reasonable.  Below is what I used for producing music videos but playback was on a TV so I didn't need the higher quality.

Perhaps you could change the video encoding?  was it set to 100% (I used 55% below.)  You might change the H.264 profile to a different setting and see the effects.




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Daz454

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Thank you for the screenshot, that certainly makes things easier. I will try what you are suggesting and get back to you about the results. I'm a bit busy these days so this may take a day or two, but I'll try to do it as soon as possible.

You mention the MP4 format, but would it make a difference (in terms of size/quality of the video) if I applied the settings you suggest but kept the AVI format? It's not that I have a particular problem with MP4, but I'd just like to keep the file as close as possible to the original. Or is MP4 superior in some way?
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ExpertNovice

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In the screenshot the encoding mode Is "quality".  The dropdown allows changing from "quality" to "bit rate".  I use 5000 bit rate for Vimeo files, per Vimeo's documentation.  I don't understand the difference!

Regardless of what I do, you should use the file format that suits your needs.  I use MP4 for a few reasons. 

Primary reason:  It is viewable on more devices.  The link below suggests AVI is not as easily usable on Apple or many other devices.

When I created an AVI file, to try and resolve an issue, the file seemed much larger.  However, when I try to determine if AVI is compressed or not some say yes and some say no.  It is unimportant to me.

I have had to convert from an M2T file to MP4/and others and then produce in CS8 to an MP4.  The final was produced again using the third conversion.  I couldn't tell the difference on my computer screen between the M2T and MP4.  I know the existed.  Note:  They were of a church sermon so not HD with symphonic music in the background.  :D

BTW, when I produce a video I use 7-zip with ultra compression to keep all files together, including the final project file.  While the compression is minor, in most cases, it keeps all files in one container.  I see others talking about C9 saying to export as a zip file so all is kept together and that sounds great.  Not sure if you can do the same with CS7.  So, after producing, compare sound and video to the original and to other productions to see how much difference there is.

Here one source, could be worthless or priceless, of differences between MP4 and AVI.

https://www.macxdvd.com/mac-dvd-video-converter-how-to/mp4-vs-avi.htm

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Daz454

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Hey! So I finally tried your suggestion, and it seems to work! The settings you suggested I modify are only available for MP4 format, but the result was a nice 190Mb file (which is only about half the size of the original). However, the video quality deteriorated slightly. It's not super obvious, but visible when I play the original and the new file side by side. I will try experiementing some more with different quality settings and let you know how it goes. At the end of the day, I don't mind converting my videos to MP4, so long as the audio and video quality is not lower than that in the original AVI and the video stays in an appropriate size range.
(Edited)
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ExpertNovice

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Normally, when I produce a file for uploading to Vimeo the file is almost the same size as the original.  (We start with a 6-12 GB .mts file, convert with handbrake to .mp4 which reduces the size by 75%, produce in CS8 to another MP4 and the file size is about the same.

I have a another method for special events where the size is significantly reduced in the second production.

In other words, different methods are used for different needs.

**Suggestion:  When testing, create a project with enough of the video to test for video and audio quality,  Then produce that project using different, and documented, settings.  Play back comparing against the original to determine the settings that find a good balance between size and quality.

Not that these settings will meet your needs but these are the settings I use to produce the sermons.  I have used higher sound settings for music and higher video settings for outdoor videos or videos of the grandkids.  (Note, these settings came from both testing and Vimeo instructions and remember, I don't know what I am doing!)

Video Settings
Frame rate: 30
Keyframe every: 10 seconds
H.264 profile:  High
H.264 level: Auto
Encoding mode: Bitrate
with a value of: 5000

Audio settings
bit rate: 96 kbps

========================
For audio files I have used a bit rate of 128 kbps and they sound fine to me.  Were they symphonic productions I would probably go higher.

again, it depends on what is important and what device it is to be replayed.