How to size video so that closed captions don't obscure content

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I want to use the closed captions, but I don't want them to get in the way of my content. I don't care about ADA compliant or whatever, that's not my audience. My audience are those that aren't native English speakers, so they can follow along with my presentations. How much real estate will they take up on the bottom of the screen? How best to accommodate them? Any help is appreciated... 
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bill.ryan

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Posted 8 months ago

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Ben Rhodes, Employee

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Hi Bill,

Camtasia for Windows does have the option to place the captions under the video.

This does not give the user the option to turn off captions.  They just appear below the video canvas.

Ben
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kayakman, Champion

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to get closed captions, you need to produce to MP4 with player; then, launch the video using the xxx.html or xxx_player.html file
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Ben Rhodes, Employee

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Hi Bill,

The "burned in" caption option is the only way to have your captions be part of the video file itself.  The other two options Camtasia gives you render the captions using HTML / CSS with our TechSmith Smart Player.  Meaning you'd have to host all the files Camtasia produces doing a local production.  Or you can use our screencast.com platform that uses the TechSmith Smart Player for video playback.

Ben
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bill.ryan

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OK thanks. What I understand is that if I launch the _player.html file from my local computer, the captions are under the video. That's good. However, if I want to upload the same video to my Screencast account, I have to resize the video vertical resolution and move the entire content of the video upwards. When producing the video I have to choose "burned in". Then (and only then) will my captions appear on the Screencast site. Did I get that right?
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Ben Rhodes, Employee

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Screencast.com supports displaying the captions under the video because it uses the same video player as the one Camtasia uses for local productions.  You can go to screencast.com and upload the MP4 video file and you should be all set.  If you are not seeing this let me know.

Thanks,
Ben
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bill.ryan

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Thanks. When producing to MP4, the only way the captions appear is if they are burned in. I guess that's the correct behavior.
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bill.ryan

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Thanks. I have been choosing "burned in captions" because I saw on some YouTube instructional videos that one should choose that, or the captions do not appear after your video is produced. I will have to try, I have no experience.
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kayakman, Champion

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if you should ever want closed captions to appear under video ...

How To Display Closed Captions Below Video Media 2019-07-15
https://www.screencast.com/t/bCfxBnTJp
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bill.ryan

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Thanks. So according to the video, you increase the vertical resolution by 110 pixels. That's enough, generally speaking, or is this a "hit or miss" depending on the content of the captions?
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kayakman, Champion

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depends on the captions ...

# of lines in the captions?; font size affects how much text fits in a line; captions can have up to 3 lines

size canvas project setting until it looks good
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bill.ryan

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My first attempt had too many lines. Second attempt went much better, I was able to limit to 2 lines. 
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David B. Demyan

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Here is my sample. I used 200 pixels. https://www.screencast.com/t/KiWRBEAVTh
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bill.ryan

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OK thanks. I have a lot of media on the video I want to produce, so I guess it will be a lot of work. You can select all media on a track, but you can't select all the media on multiple tracks. I have like 4 tracks... Thanks again. 
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kayakman, Champion

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regarding the multiple tracks of stuff thing, try grouping ...

How To Group All Before Changing Project Settings 2019-07
https://www.screencast.com/t/iTpqBq6JS

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Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

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Hi bill.ryan,

Since I work with captions, I thought I would offer a few tips and best practices to you and others who may need to add "other language" captions to their video content. This may be helpful to those who come to this topic in the future.

Overall, you say you don't need ADA compliance, however, those standards actually are the best in terms of font style, font size, color, line size, etc. for ANYONE needing to read captions. When creating captions for those who speak another language, captions need to be EXTRA simple.. (Uber ADA, if you will). This is because it's very hard to watch the screen to gather the information presented while also trying to read the screen to gather context. Oftentimes the viewer needs to replay short sections over and over to be able to gather all they need in order to move on.


Therefore, captions for "other languages" have some special requirements to make them beneficial to your viewers.

1. The captions should be timed to what is happening on the screen. To accomplish this, you may have to extend video frames to allow more time. Overall, don't shrink the font to get them to fit in the time allowed. Instead, extend the video frames to accommodate the captions.


2. When creating the video, only talk about one concept at a time. This makes it easier to caption, and for your viewers to grasp the concepts. Additionally, keep the English text simple and free from English slang, run on sentences, jokes, or cultural references.

3. Keep learning or instructional tutorials shorter than 5 minutes in duration. Reading captions and applying instructional concepts can be fatiguing to viewers.

4. Keep the caption font's style and size within the ADA recommendations. This provides clarity in all languages. Making the font smaller. or adding colored text can cause some languages/words to become intelligible. Or, those with color blindness may not be able to see the text.

5. Look at examples of how companies create "other language" captions. At TechSmith, we add multiple language caption files to our tutorial and marketing videos. In this video, you can see how the video is created to support captions in many languages. https://www.techsmith.com/tutorial-camtasia-working-with-the-canvas.html
6. Captioning takes practice to get it right. You won't get it perfect the first time around.

7. Ask for feedback on the caption's timing, font, and placement - from those who speak the other language.

8. Captions in other languages should be translated correctly, and presented in a way that is culturally respectful. 

I hope these tips help anyone who may need to add "other language" captions to their videos.

Kelly
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bill.ryan

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Thanks a lot for your good tips!
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hilary.lustig

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OK - newbie here..just bought camtasia to burn captions, are you saying that I can only burn captions into videos that will be hosted by the techsmith video player?  i can't find any tutorials on burning captions or importing your caption files as an SRT
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Joe Morgan

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If you Burn in captions.
The captions are in fact burned into the video. They cannot be removed.
So, the mp4 produced is all you will need.
The Smart Player itself is not needed to view them.
I don't know why you're forced to use the smart player options to burn them.???



to Import a .srt
Click the gear Icon in the Captions Panel at the top of the panel.



Regards,Joe
(Edited)