I use Movavi as my primary video studio.

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I use Movavi as my primary video studio. Movavi lets me set recording time with one click. I'm evaluating Camtasia 2019, at four times the price, and don't see that feature. A check with "support" has a very lengthy workaround to set record times. Is this the best you can do? Am I missing something? Will the 2020 Camtasia correct this discrepancy?
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LarryMaloney

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Posted 2 months ago

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Rick Stone

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Hi there

Can you be more explicit? 

I see you want to "set recording time". But what exactly does this mean?

Are you wanting to have the ability to configure a timer that somehow spawns a recording session at a specified time? Say, 8:23AM?

Or are you wanting a way to command Camtasia to record for say, five minutes total?

Or maybe both?

Cheers... Rick :)
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LarryMaloney

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One feature of Camtasia (and Movavi) is "screen record." But when I record a screen video I don't want to sit in front of my computer and monitor the recording process while the software is capturing the event. With Movavi I simply set a time. For example, if the screening event I want to capture is 58 minutes long, I can set the record time to 58 minutes -  or longer to be sure and edit later.  Camtasia technical support gave me a mile-long workaround to do this but I didn't bother to read it; it's way too involved and lengthy.  I'm not understanding why a $49.00 piece of software has a timer feature and Camtasia does not. With Movavi I can also set the start time and the end time (a feature I haven't used.)   I set the time in Movavi by: "Capture," then "Schedule",  then "Set Time Recording." And I can walk away knowing Movavi will stop filling my hard drive at the time limit I set. 
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Rick Stone

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Thanks for the explanation. I'm sure that will help the Camtasia developers that visit here.

However, there is one bit I'm curious about. You say you "don't want to sit in front of my computer and monitor the recording process while the software is capturing the event."

Is this to say that once that recording process begins, you are free to use other things on your computer and somehow that recording process just merrily records whatever window you told it to?

As for why any piece of software does this or that, it's anyone's guess unless you are part of the history of the software's creation. My own guess is that with Camtasia, it was created from the onset for recording screen activity and narrating it as you record. Camtasia's older sibling SnagIt was created to capture screen shots. Mostly for documenting software. So recording screen videos and narrating them is a natural offshoot. Things like recording something like a webinar or whatnot likely evolved from that.

Cheers... Rick :)
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LarryMaloney

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Rick, yes, I have a second monitor so take notes on the video as it records - or do other work unrelated on the second screen. I can also walk away and come back after lunch and my recording stopped timely with cheap little Movavi. With Camtasia, I have to sit there monitoring the recording. Otherwise, I would come back from lunch with 15 minutes of needed screen captured, and an hour of dead space I need to edit out. I have many VHS videos to convert to DVD and don't want to babysit Camtasia so it doesn't fill my hard drive with empty recording time. I do one thing at a time; don't think I can record and narrate simultaneously. I need the recording first, then I can write script, copy, dialog - whatever is appropriate based on a storyboard. I like Camtasia but don't want to use two software packages because one (the much more expensive Camtasia,) lacks a simple feature.  I'm surprised Camtasia is not familiar with the competition. Movavi isn't as sophisticated as Camtasia but they make up for it with a beautiful presenter :)
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Glenn Hoeppner, Employee

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Hi Larry,

I think what you're seeing is a different focus between the two products. I am not familiar with Movavi, but while Camtasia does do screen recording, we're primarily targeting users who are creating tutorials, training and other educational-types of content.

I don't think scheduling recordings of other content is a primary need for those types of users, which is why it's a lengthy process to achieve this with Camtasia.

Thanks for your question, and explaining your use case. I hope you're able to find some other value in Camtasia that suits your needs.

-Glenn
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LarryMaloney

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Glenn, another possibility is for Camtasia to actually compete with other products. It would take little to add a record timer and let the customers decide how it benefits them. How can you declare that all your customers who create tutorials, training and other educational-types of content would not benefit from a record time feature? My purpose if for those things you highlighted and the record feature is convenient. Again, If I'm capturing a screen to include in my training video I'm forced to babysit the procedure if using Camtasia, but not Moravia and other software applications. Of course, Camtasia has other value. The issue is why is management so reluctant to compete with other software companies? You are in their sites - they compete with you. And someday they may equal what you are offering, plus the ability to time limit the recording. Right now not everyone uses the Movavi timer. From a personal perspective, it might be that I've used software applications longer than you have been alive. My point being, I've used lots of quality software, and some junk. The ones that survive innovate. Microsoft Excel has many feature few use, but they are there. Ninety-percent of their customers use ten-percent of the available features.  And ten-percent of their users use ninety-percent of the features. Microsoft didn't rest on the seventh day, they keep innovating. The best time to innovate is while you are the leader. Or wait, and play catch up. Many go under trying to add innovation five years too late.
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Brooks, Camtasia Technical Product Manager

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Hey Larry,

I don't believe Glenn's intention was to ignore your feedback or express an unwillingness to compete. Camtasia has a lot of feature requests and we take them all seriously. This is personally the only time I can remember hearing this request for Camtasia and I talk to a lot of customers and read lots of feedback requests on a daily basis. I totally get why you like the feature and see it could be useful for some folks. We'll put it in wishlist, but we will likely not prioritize it until we see or hear quite a few more requests. I hate saying that. It always bums me out to disappoint someone who has a genuine need. Our software isn't perfect. It's doesn't have some features it probably should and it's got other features that could be improved significantly, but it does have a lot of features and value packed into it and is something we take tremendous pride in trying to improve daily. I hope you will give the entire product a good test before deciding whether or not it's worth the money.

Brooks
Camtasia Technical Product Manager
Mobile Technical Product Manager
TechSmith
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LarryMaloney

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Brooks,

Thanks for taking the time to comment. I didn't know the feature existed until I discovered it. Only then did I realize it's value. That may be the same for other users. It's so freeing to set a timer and be able to leave the recording to do other things. Sitting and waiting is so wasteful, especially once you experience the timer. I don't think it would take Movavi much programming to get where you are. But you could add the timer with even much less effort. Thanks for putting it on the wishlist. I suspect it will die there because, like me, other users don't realize a timer control is possible. In industry, I used to create programs for industrial programmable controllers. I created numerous timers and counters, almost daily. I never gave it a thought to be a time-consuming task. But, I don't write software. For now, I'll buy Movavi's upgrade coming out soon. The present version has all the tools to create training and teaching videos, plus that nifty little stop timer. I'll look at the 2020 version of Camtasia and see what it adds to my tools next spring. Thanks for your comments.
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Joe Morgan

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 Brooks, I realize you're fairly new around here.I'd like to share my observations on the topic with you.

First off, I appreciate the direction you’ve been taking Camtasia.}:>)

My Camtasia usage started with version 7 for Windows. A recording timer has been requested going back as long as this forum has existed. I’m confident this was requested in the forum pre-dating this one.

The first link below dates back 7 years

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/setting_a_timer_to_automatically_stop_recording

As a feature request it received 38 votes a couple of years back.

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/schedule-start-and-stop-times-for-video-recordin

Here’s a few more.

 https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/timer-off-while-in-record-mode

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/camtasia-recorder-9-feature-request-start-and-stop-timer-for-recording-recording-in-2nd-tab

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/camtasia_auto_record

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/i-see-multiple-people-asking-for-a-recording-timer-over-several-years-yet-still-not-available

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/adding-a-timer-to-camtasia-for-auto-turn-on-an-auto-turn-off

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/timer_for_live_video

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/camtasia-timer-plugin-or-technique

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/auto-stop-recording-feature

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/build_in_schedule_timer_feature

 There are many others. A large % of the requests I've read are buried in posts.Ones that have nothing to do with a timer. Finding those would be difficult.

Theres probably a greater number of requests to add one to SnagIt than Camtasia. I could post a whole slew of links regarding SnagIt.

I would utilize this as well. Probably not that often? But a useful feature to be sure.

This would be good for Camtasia & SnagIt both.

Regards,Joe

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paulwilliamengle

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If nothing else, I think this highlights a different intake system for the Voice of the Customer.


Brooks, this is no slam on you -anyone at TechSmith could have made that post - but Product Management is that situationally unaware of client wants, how are you able to iterate to quick and long-term wins.


I don’t have the answer, but I’m thinking there should be a way to track client votes better than a message board. Something static that stays front of mind for client and TechSmith alike.
(Edited)
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LarryMaloney

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I didn't know we voted. That's how we got Trump! (JK) Maybe some features are votable - choices, but with differing features, why not both, A & B? Years ago, in my industry, a vendor came monthly to restock the parts bin of our maintenance department.  He wore a black silk shirt, black pants, black boots, wore a gold watch and a gold chain around his neck. He drove a black Cadillac with gold-colored rims - quite a sight. In spite of his monthly restocking trips and ten-times retail pricing, the bins always lacked enough  6-inch pipe nipples; but we always had 3-inch nipples, two bins worth, in fact. I questioned him why and he explained, "The three-inchers are the most popular so I keep those bins full. Nobody uses the six-inchers much so I just leave a few."  With that explanation, it was my turn so I explained to the over-priced parts salesman, " the six-inch nipples don't get used much because there's never enough to do the project. To compensate, the maintenance crew connects two three-inch nipples together to do the jobs. So, because you don't fill the six-inch bin our workers have to use a connector and two three-inch pipe nipple to make one six-inch length of pipe. He understood. A workaround doesn't mean something is ideal.

Because I was involved I was curious enough to see what we were paying for his services. When I discovered we were paying ten-times what we could buy the parts for elsewhere we changed vendors. His parting words were, "You are paying for my service." Not any more!

Unless customers get to use the features they might not realize how beneficial a feature can be. 
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Brooks, Camtasia Technical Product Manager

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Thanks for the feedback. You guys certainly have more mastery of where all the old threads lie in GetSat. ;-)

I'm not sure "situationally" unaware is an accurate assessment. Camtasia has sold millions of licenses and we talk to an awful lot of folks every single day from that rather large pool of users. There's a ton of feedback that doesn't get exposed or surfaced in this forum that I have a perspective on that probably isn't easy to see if you aren't in my perch.

Our business unit leader, is the original product manager who guided Camtasia from it's very beginning into being a successful commercial product. He is a road warrior and is constantly out visiting customers and sending back videos and detailed notes of the challenges they are facing. We have a dedicated strategy lead who is always scanning the space looking for opportunities and assessing weaknesses. We have a research team that does several hundred phone interviews a year for Camtasia alone (I try to sit in on as many of those calls as I can).

Our support staff logs requests brought to them and that gets fed into our Idea Funnel. We do purge from time to time for sanity's sake and to keep clarity on the areas we are most focused. 

I try to wade in here as much as possible and see what's popping up. When I filter by "Me Toos" on feature requests I try to answer anything higher than 50 and make sure the more popular things we aren't going to immediately address stay in our Idea Funnel so we don't lose sight of them even if they aren't in our focus area. With the 2019 release we picked off something like 8-10 of the requests from the top 15 in GetSat feature requests (maybe you all didn't love the implementations we chose, but that's something we can continue to have a discussion about).

One of the first things I did taking on this role was do competitive analysis in the marketplace going from the Pro Tools (Premiere, Final Cut, Davinci) to directly in our wheelhouse (Screenflow) to the up and coming consumer focused players (Rush, Movavi, Filmora). I've personally got a pretty good handle on what those tools can do and where their strengths and weaknesses are. I try to use all of them on a regular basis and encourage our product team to do the same.

We have been keeping a close eye on gap analysis with direct competitors (e.g. Screenflow) and shutting down significant differences systematically.

We run multiple betas throughout the year. Some of those are with longstanding customers and others are larger random samples that a third party brings in and manages. We get lots of feedback from that channel.

We do a massive amount of surveys with both users who purchase and don't purchase. Those bring yet another heap of feature requests / problems to be solved to the table.

We also try to be strategic and innovative. Our senior leadership team and product team pick an area of focus every year. Within that we identify the areas we believe present the most opportunity and that becomes the thrust of most of our yearly cadence. We typically focus on problem areas that will allow us to differentiate ourselves in what is an incredibly competitive landscape.

Then there's the rather delicate balance of being approachable enough, but powerful enough. We can't just throw everything in willy nilly. It becomes unsustainable from a coding perspective and it would not provide the type of user experience and approachable power that is our calling card in the space.

We're focused on screen video, training and tutorials, though we recognize it's a "big tent" user base and there are lots of different usage scenarios and try to accommodate as best we can. We can't be everything to everyone--there's danger there. We're not going to outdo the Pro NLEs, but we should have a quicker learning curve. We're not going to put as many rails in place as consumer focused editing solutions--there's some real flexibility and meat on the bones if you dig in. We should have a super compelling set of rich features if your recording screen videos and pumping out tutorials.

So, I know it's frustrating for folks that something they want / need hasn't made the cut. There are so many areas of Camtasia that I want to improve or innovate in and it drives me nuts that we can't just get it all done in a snap. We have to choose and do as much as we can within the constraints of time and our human resources. 

Our software isn't perfect. There are glaring needs and more rough edges than we want. But it also has a pretty nifty set of capabilities and passionate users like yourselves who are hungry for more. All we can do is be dedicated to doing the best that we can to improve the product.

There's never been a better leadership group running the product than there is now. There are real video pros with deep industry experience. Building that product team is a move we've made over the last 14 months. One of the things we're doing is making a huge commitment to living in the product as we build it. We're doing real projects and feeling the pain and joy that comes along with it. I've got about 30 hours logged working in Camtasia since Monday (bachelor life this week while my wife is out of town :-) ). We really care and we're working hard. Our engineering team has been lights out for about the last year; really on a roll. Expect good things to be coming. Might not be your personal wishlist, but the nightly builds I live in are packed with really good stuff. Still a lot of blocking and tackling to do, but real progress is being made.

So talk is cheap and I've done more here than I should. We need to walk the the walk. I'm going to go back and live in the dev build for a couple of more hours before I hit the hay. If any of you want to talk to me personally, I'm always happy to chat as time allows. Reach me at b[dot]andrus[at]techsmith[dot]com and we can set something up.


Brooks
Camtasia Technical Product Manager
Mobile Technical Product Manager
TechSmith
(Edited)
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LarryMaloney

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The entrepreneur who starts a business knows better than anyone the work and risk it takes. But they aren't always the visionary needed to get a growing business where it can be. Letting a few customers vote on your future seems risky. Other visionaries are looking at your software and seeing ways to improve. By your admission there are many. They don't need  customer opinion votes to see the future! They are possessed.