I want to insert an equations into an annotation box. how can I do it? I can only write simple characters

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How can I write annotation that include equation
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itamar.benshachar

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Posted 1 year ago

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Ed Covney

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There are at least two ways to accomplish this.

One - keep a set of all the characters you'll need in an app that can host your math characters - then copy and paste (I use Open Office Writer).
If you copy and paste the characters into an annotation editor, some characters may not work.
I just tried these and they work: α β γ Δ δ ε θ λ μ π ρ σ τ φ ω. 

Two, write your equations in the equation editor of your choice. Then snag or snip it as a picture and add it as a piece of media that can be used in lieu of an annotation.

 


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kayakman, Champion

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dueling posts :)
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kayakman, Champion

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have you tried typing it in a word processor, then copy/paste?

I believe you can also enter special characters using the Windows character map
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itamar.benshachar

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yes, I tried and it gave me wrong characters. it is not only the characters but also fractions, e^x and so on
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Ed Covney

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" I tried and it gave me wrong characters " -
I could never remember the codes  (or the syntax) so I spent a Saturday putting it all in  files I could retrieve quickly.

This text box doesn't allow sub or superscripts nor do Camtasia annotations. So either of the below will force you to use pictures of doing it elsewhere.  
What I pasted in was: (both exist on one line of text).
 
BTW, newer versions of excel can import the ods file I linked previously. 

Math symbols can also be found at: https://www.rapidtables.com/math/symbols/Statistical_Symbols.html
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kayakman, Champion

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I thought this worked with legacy callouts?

can't test myself right now because I'm producing some very large projects

if it doesn't work, apologize for misdirection 
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Ed Covney

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" I thought this worked with legacy callouts?"  Me too. Not being able to do  Super and Sub script was a real surprise!!
Until edit boxes would just plainly state "I accept 16-bit ascii"   or  "I cannot accept 16-bit" then we wouldn't have to experiment . .  every time.
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Ed Covney

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I forgot to offer the wide-character data that I've accumulated over the years:

In Open Office, Write (odt):
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xrnRKusjm4_N7EDx3PD7-m1iuaB_1Kus/view?usp=sharing

and Calc (ods) formats:
https://drive.google.com/file/d/1xW3gSKXsyy1ZMqOhu2cw1nIqwz6PMKRh/view?usp=sharing
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kayakman, Champion

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FYI, I am able to copy special characters from the Windows Character Map, past them into any text document, then copy that string and past it into a callout [new style, etc]

like 1⁄4

does this help?

FYI, they past OK in the edit box here but some go nuts after saving the post


(Edited)
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Ed Covney

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I can't answer for itamar.benshachar but I don't think finding representative characters is the problem, it's placing them where they're useful singly or in groups. 
I should probably learn Latex!