I want to record "how to" videos with my camcorder. Can I import video into CS8 then edit, and add dialog later? Any special file format?

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I want to record "how to" videos with my camcorder. Can I import video into CS8 then edit, and add dialog later? Any special file format?
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rvf263

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Posted 4 years ago

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Rick Stone

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Hi there

It's going to depend on your camcorder. What media does it record on? DV Tape? DVD? SD Card?

The media may determine how you end up getting the content into the PC. There isn't much of a need to sort file formats until we are certain we know what we are dealing with on the storage medium.

Cheers... Rick :)
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rvf263

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Hi Rick,
Thanks for the quick reply.
Sorry, I'm new to this but I'm almost sure I'll be using an SD card camcorder.

Thanks again, Bob
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Timbre4, Champion

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It will also depend on it's output type; check to see what kind of files it writes.
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Rick Stone

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Hello again Bob

Cool, if on SD card, you are already ahead of the game. I see Timbre4 advised about the output type. While that's important, it's not a deal breaker. There are lots of applications that are able to transcode from one format to another if the format your camcorder uses doesn't seem to be understood directly by Camtasia.
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Karl S

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If you look at the Import Media window and set the file type to Video Files you will get a list of supported video file formats for import.
avi, mp4, mpg, mpeg, mts, m2ts, wmv, mov, swf
With these notes in the Help file:

Camtasia Studio does not support multiple tracks in an MOV. Camtasia Studio imports one video and one audio track from an MOV file.
Only SWF files created with Jing or a previous version of Camtasia Studio can be imported.

You may be able to bring in others but I doubt it.  At my previous job I used Sony Vegas to do some editing of the raw camcorder video and then produced a file to bring into Camtasia.

Karl
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Timbre4, Champion

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Wow, I didn't think mts or m2ts (which I think the camcorder writes) would be in the list, we're catching up!

I still use Vegas for live action and if I recall correctly AVI compatibility was iffy as the Vegas version wrote something perhaps in file header that Camtasia didn't like.

I will be curious to know how this turns out.


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Karl S

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Going from a 3 year memory, but I believe Vegas will output a couple different settings for the avi files.  There may be a setting to get them to work if you prefer them.  I say this because I think a few times I used avi from Vegas.  I believe I primarily used mp4, though, but am not sure and couldn't tell you why I chose what I did.
~ Karl
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Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

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Hi rvf263,

If you are going to use your camcorder to create your videos, please do a 1 minute test run before you fully go down that path. Camtasia Studio does import many kinds of video files, however, not all MP4, MOV, etc are the same although they have the same file extension. So, as Rick states, you will need to convert these files before bringing them into Camtasia Studio.

If you do not have to use a camcorder, and you have a smartphone / tablet with video capability, then our Fuse app might work well for you. This is a free application that allows you to send video recordings from your mobile device directly into the Camtasia Studio clip bin in the correct format. Using Fuse, you do not need to worry about SD card extraction, getting your video into the correct format, transferring from the SD card to your desktop, blah blah blah.

You can find out more about Fuse here:
https://www.techsmith.com/fuse.html?gclid=CPej7YrAh8UCFRAaaQodHlcA-A

Fuse also works well with getting images into Camtasia or Snagit.

Also, depending on what kind of tutorial you are going to create, we have our Coache's Eye app that allows you to make great videos you can slow down or speed up, draw on the screen to show direction, etc. While it's original use is for sports, you can use Coache's Eye to record anything you need to give direction on. You can see some overview videos and examples here:
https://www.coachseye.com/gettingstarted


Good luck with your project!

Kelly
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rvf263

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Thanks for all the replies!
I'll take a look at the Fuse App, that might work as well. 

Any recommendations for a good file converter that Camtasia works nicely with?

I'll be posting back soon with updates.

Thanks again!
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Timbre4, Champion

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That's probably going to depend on what format you need to convert.
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rvf263

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So, the camcorder I want to use is a:

Panasonic HX-DC1 

Video: MPEG-4 AVC/H.264

Voice Memo: MPEG-4 AAC Audio


The "how to" videos will consist mostly of narration and will have short videos throughout to explain specific areas. There will also be still shots I'm sure.

So here's an idea I wanted to offer:

1) Record the video
2) Play it back on my PC
3) Open camtasia and record the PC screen of the recorded video
4) Add narration if needed
5) Edit the video/Audio as needed

Would this work?

Thanks to everyone for helping me work this out.
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Joe Morgan

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That would work, but to be honest.

You could spend less money on a more capable video editing program.

Load you footage directly into most programs without converting or recording anything. Add narration and edit the video. You can even do some special effect for the fun of it.

Camtasia is a screen recorder First.
If you Need a high quality recording of your screen, Camtasia does that very well.
 As a video editor. It can edit video but it's not a full featured editor.
It's best for recording onscreen tutorials and creating interactive Quizzes for students.

A pure video editor would serve you well.

Regards, Joe

(Edited)
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rvf263

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Joe,
Thanks for your input.
I think a pure video editor might be what I'm really looking for and need.

Thanks again, Bob
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Karl S

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I always had this flow:
  • Record the camcorder video
  • Record the screen capture (order here did not matter to me)
  • Combine screen capture and camcorder video, editing as needed (sometimes this was done in Sony Vegas if I wanted to use some effects that were not possible in Camtasia. This was normally picture in picture, moving the inset camcorder video when needed to get it out of the way of something on the screen recording.)
  • Add any necessary voice over and call-outs.
  • Add Markers for a menu when desired
  • Produce video using Camtasia (This was for playback control consistency so even if everything else was done n Vegas, Camtasia produced the final output)
Karl

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