iMovie import & best practices

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  • Updated 3 years ago
What are some best practices tips & techniques for importing Snagit or Camtasia Mac assets into iMovie?
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Jordan Skole

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  • confident

Posted 9 years ago

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Jordan Skole

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In order to recreate the conversation happing on another thread I am going to simply copy and paste the responses here.
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Jordan Skole

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Conan Heiselt, (Official Rep), commented less than a minute ago
Great question. Do you mind creating a new topic asking this question (i.e. how i can take a camtasa file into i movie?) so that others who have the same question can find the answer?
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Jordan Skole

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Mike Curtis, Official Rep, replied 4 days ago
I'd render it out using the default "Web" preset. That will make an MP4 that iMovie will like. If you want to go overboard, use the custom production path and then pick MP4 or MOV and crank up the quality. You'll get a huge file, but you can remedy that in iMovie when you produce your final.
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Jordan Skole

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Conan Heiselt, (Official Rep), commented 1 day ago
Or in Camtasia for Mac, just choose "Export" from the Share menu. This will give you an MP4. Then in iMovie go to the "File" menu Import > Movies... and browse to the MP4. iMovie will take a bit to import and "optimize" it.
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aureliaandrewsb

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iMovie only supports importing MP4 formats with MPEG4/AAC or H.264/AAC data, not all kinds of MP4 formats. Some MP4 files from like Sony, Hybrid camcorders and other devices cannot be accepted by iMovie.

All in all, to smoothly import Snagit or Camtasia MP4 or AVI to iMovie, you'd better to convert these MP4 or AVI files to iMovie totally compatible MP4 or MOV
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grewetab

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Officials said DV, MPEG-4, MPEG-2, MOV and M4V file types are compatible with iMovie.

To import videos into iMovie, you'd better to convert your video to iMovie supported formats.

Here is a guide to help you import MP4 into iMovie: http://www.faasoft.com/articles/mp4-to-imovie-converter.html

It also applies to import any video and audio into iMovie for editing.
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David M. Converse

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Official Response
iMovie supports media formats that QuickTime will decode, so we recommend using QuickTime format for sharing from Camtasia for Mac. Select Share->Advanced Export to access the QuickTime Options.

If you are moving video from Camtasia for Mac to iMovie or another video editor, Apple has some codecs specifically designed for this purpose. Try using one of these if they are available:

Animation
Apple Intermediate Codec
Apple Pixlet Video

Animation creates very large but high-quality files. Apple Intermediate is specifically designed for editing (especially HD video), and Pixlet works well with animation and flat color graphics (cartoons, screencasts, etc.)

Note that the second two are Mac-only and will not be playable on a Windows PC, even with QuickTime for Windows installed.

For export to iDVD, share to a QuickTime movie. Make sure that your exported movie is NOT optimized for streaming as these videos will not work in iDVD. You'll want to have your finished video be the correct dimensions for a DVD so iDVD doesn't have to scale it during production.

From Snagit, you'll want to save out as png, jpeg, pdf, or tiff for best results. PNG files support transparency which can be useful in movie compositing. Snagit for Mac can resize images; we recommend saving out at the pixel dimensions you need rather than scaling images in iMovie.

You can also use iMovie as a front end for Camtasia for Mac, for example if I had video in AVCHD format. I would import to iMovie, export from AVCHD to a format that Camtasia for Mac can read, and import that clip into Camtasia.

You can drag-and-drop images from Snagit to iPhoto to import them or save to a folder on the hard drive and import within iPhoto.

Finally, remember that the mac has tools like AppleScript and Automator if you want to try your hand at creating a custom workflow from TechSmith products to other software on your computer.
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keybounce

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Bumping.

How would I specify that I wanted to use "Apple Intermediate Codec"? Using Camtasia as pass 1, and iMovie as pass 2 is my normal workflow, and if there is a codec specifically for that, great!.

Also, you mentioned iDVD. If I wanted to have my markers in Camtasia export as chapter marks for DVD, what do I need to do? (What little I know is that the file has to have a .m4v extension, which is otherwise identical to .mp4, but I have no idea what else needs to be done).
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Jeroen Heydendael

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Hi,

I want to export a screencast from Camtasia 7 for Windows and import it to iMovie '11 on the Mac. Do you know what's the best practice for this? And what are the pro's and con's for making the captions in Camtasia before moving on with iMovie which I want to use for some backgrounds and production.
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Mike Curtis, Employee

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Paco,
I've never used iMovie for the intent of captioning. What do you use to achieve this effect? One of the titling templates? As a rule of thumb, I believe most people always do captions as the very last step before final production.

I have access to iMovie 11 and am curious about learning more about what you're trying to do. Based on what I know at this time, if you want quick entry of 508-compliant captions, I'd be tempted to get a high quality video into Camtasia Studio and leverage the caption-specific feature prior to final production. I can see how if you want more artistic captions (subtitles?) iMovie could be the way to go.

One final idea--some people use custom callouts/images in Camtasia Studio to bring in whatever background or style "captions" they want. They just manipulate the captions as a sort of specialized callout.

I bet others have a lot to add on this topic too.
Mike Curtis
User Assistance
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David M. Converse

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Paco, there is not a way to move captions from Camtasia Studio to iMovie because iMovie does not directly support captions. iMovie has titles which may work, or you can use a third-party captioning program to add QuickTime captions (which is simply a QuickTime text track) to your finished movie.

You may be able to export captions as an SRT file and use that on the Mac- I'd suggest hitting Google for information or contacting Apple.
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nonsequito

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I exported a Camtasia movie to QuickTime (.mov), imported into iMovie, tried to use stabilizer, and it didn't work. Only the top have of the imported movie appeared—in the bottom half of the stabilizer screen. Though the imported movie did play in the normal iMovie window. 

I then  tried to import the original .mov file, and when I click on it and get the "open with" options, iMovie isn't there.  I though iMovie imported QuickTime format?

Looking for a way to stabilize movies I took with a Sony RX100M3, saved as mp4