In Camtasia 9, what is the difference between "delete" and "ripple delete"?

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PJL Trainer

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Posted 3 years ago

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Rick Stone

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Delete should remove whatever is selected. If it's between other media, a gap is left behind.
Ripple delete removes whatever is selected and if a gap would be left behind, media to the right is moved to occupy the gap that would have been left so there is no "dead space".

I believe it's named "Ripple" because it causes a ripple change effect down the line.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Joe Morgan

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A.J. Ripple invented the technique. He worked for Adobe, he also designed and created Premiere Pro and After Effects.
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ken.lemieux

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That's a great new feature, love it!
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connelly.shawn

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I understand the difference between delete and ripple delete but what is the difference between a ripple delete and a cut? They both result in the same objective.
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Tereza

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I have the same question - what is the difference between Ripple Delete and Cut?

Also, @Camtasia - I could not find "Ripple" or "Ripple delete" in your online help.  The only reference I found was the keyboard shortcut for the action, but no explanation of what it is.

Thanks.
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Rick Stone

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According to the page at the link below, Cut and Ripple Delete are basically the same thing.

https://support.techsmith.com/hc/en-us/articles/115000336311-Camtasia-Hotkeys



Cheers... Rick :)
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Rick Stone

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Also, I suppose that because Delete and Cut behave differently, maybe TechSmith added the term "Ripple Delete" so folks that use other non-linear editors might better understand Camtasia?

But that's just a guess on my part.
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Joe Morgan

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So Tereza,

A cut removes media from the timeline and places it on the clipboard so you can paste it somewhere else on the timeline.
If there is other media on the timeline, a gap will form on the same track where you "Cut" the media from.


A ripple delete executed on one track of media will close the gap when you delete the media.

You can also perform a Ripple delete on several tracks of media simultaneously.

You selecting them using the sliding red and green markers on the timeline indicator.

Regards,Joe
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robert

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great explanation!
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Tereza

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Well, at the risk of beating a dead horse, I will say that I still don't see that there is a difference between Cut and Ripple Delete.
And for my day-to-day, I guess I'll treat the as identical.

To summarize...
In practice, they both:
  • Copy to the clipboard
  • Close the gap
  • Stitch the remaining media together
But why do both exist?  And with different keyboard shortcuts, if they are identical?

@Rick Stone - thanks for that link. 
However, a little odd that the description of "Cut" in that same document has a different format, and looking at the two together, neither fully describes what on earth is going on.

At least "Delete" is easy - doesn't copy to clipboard, leaves gap in timeline.  Done.

Thanks again, everyone.
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Joe Morgan

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Cut doesn't close the gap. If you just watch this GIF You'll see what I mean.

The selected media in the center is cut and a gap is created.



Why the help file is worded incorrectly is a bit of a mystery. If you use the Red and Green timeline indicator Sliders to make a selection.


The wording is correct, it performs a ripple delete by closing the gap.Copy's the cut media to the clipboard and you can past the cut section to another track.


So the Help file isn't very helpful in that regard. Do you see the difference now?

A Ripple Delete by definition..........Closes the Gap.
  
Regards,Joe
(Edited)
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Tereza

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Aha - a difference!!
I am almost always using those red/green sliders to select a section of a media component (or components)...so I never really noticed the scenario in your gif.

When doing that, then Cut and Ripple Delete seem to be identical - close gap, deleted bit goes to clipboard.
BUT....!!
If you select an entire media component, which is what your GIF shows, then...
THEN!!
Cut and Ripple Delete act different.
Eureka!

OK - I've run out of exclamation points.
Now I get it - the difference applies when selecting an entire media component, but when selecting sections using the sliders, there's no difference.

Thanks for your patience.
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Rick Stone

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Good job on that explanation. I had not considered that there could be multiple images or disparate media and was only thinking in terms of working with a single video clip using the red and green adjustment tools.
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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@Tereza,

Sorry for the confusion.  I did some checking using Camtasia 9.1.1, and I also looked at the current code paths for Cut vs. Ripple Delete when you have a timeline selection.

The first thing to note is that for timeline operations in Camtasia 9.1.1, we do not place things on the Windows clipboard.  Instead, Camtasia stores the copied media objects in memory as a "clipping", which is just stored in memory that is used only in Camtasia.  The following steps illustrate this:
1. In Notepad.exe, copy some text to the Windows clipboard.
2. In Camtasia, select a callout and Copy it.  This is saved as a clipping.
3. Back in Notepad.exe, use paste.  Note that the text you copied in step #1 is pasted.  This means that step #2 did NOT overwrite what was on the Windows clipboard.
4. Back in Camtasia, use paste.  Note that the callout copied in step #2 is pasted.  This shows that Camtasia is pasting the clipping (private to Camtasia) and not what is on the Windows clipboard.

The second thing to note is that with a timeline range selection, the only difference between Cut and Ripple Delete is that Cut will save the cut media as a clipping (which can be pasted inside Camtasia) but Ripple Delete will not save a clipping.

The following steps illustrate Cut saving a clipping:
1. Copy a callout to create a clipping.
2. Paste the callout to prove that the callout got copied.
3. Use the red/green selectors to make a range selection.
4. Cut the range selection.
5. Paste.  Note that the cut media are pasted.  This shows that the callout clipping you copied in step #1 was overwritten by the cut operation in step #4.

The following steps illustrate Ripple Delete does not save a clipping:
1. Copy a callout to create a clipping.
2. Paste the callout to prove that the callout got copied.
3. Use the red/green selectors to make a range selection.
4. Ripple delete the range selection.
5. Paste.  Note that the callout is pasted.  This shows that the callout clipping you copied in step #1 was NOT overwritten by the ripple delete operation in step #4.

I hope this helps explain the difference.  It's subtle.  But there is a difference.
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Tereza

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Crystal clear.  Thanks for being so thorough.
Perhaps your explanation here (and even the screenshots from @Joe Morgan) can be used in the documentation. 
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Rick Stone

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I'd like to offer an apology to Tereza for my own misunderstanding at the beginning of this thread.
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Dave O'Rourke, Senior Software Engineer

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@Tereza, I've passed your request on to our UA team that manages the documentation and help content.  Thanks for the feedback.
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Tereza

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Rick - don't be silly - I see your name associated with so many helpful, creative, and thorough answers...!!!  It's very easy to misinterpret simply based on one's own experience.   It took me about 12 reads through to understand that one example showed selecting a portion of media, and the other selected an entire thing.
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Steve_D

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Thank you Tereza for the question (& to the OP to start things) and especially to Dave, Rick and Joe for your answers.

This might explain why Cam9 was crashing on me.

In Cam8 I would use Cut to remove stuff and leave no gap but when I did the same in Cam9 after several minutes into my video, Cam9 would regularly crash on me.

Looks like it was because I was clogging up the memory since I was still using the Cut option.

Since I began using the Ripple Delete option, Cam9 has not crashed once.

Possibly unrelated but then again, possibly not.

Cut for clipboard - Ripple Delete for trash ;-)
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andrewelderjr

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Only issue is that, even in Camtasia 2018, it's not a true "ripple delete". It works fine if you're selecting one clip on a track -- or clips on multiple tracks vertically that are the same length -- but if you are deleting two or more clips on the SAME track, it only moves media over as much as the piece closest to the right side, leaving a gap where any deletions to the left occurred.

(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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If you make a selection using the red and green timeline sliders. The green one is slid out of view to the left.



You can ripple delete multiple media tracks. And even cut into the next track.
However, it effects all tracks.

You could lock other tracks and avoid deleting them, but that's inconvenient.

Regards,Joe