Is it possible to edit a layered .gif file in Camtasia to then export that file into a new .gif file, and keep existing .gif sequencing?

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I want to make a video using Camtasia, showing its possible to use Snagit to annotate .gif files. This would only be possible knowing that I could import flattened .gif files, that retain their active .gif sequences. Then, in turn, be able to export another video sequence either .gif or .mp4 screencast from Camtasia. 

Is it possible to edit in this way or does one have to do it some other way? 
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coldwhitefire

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Posted 3 years ago

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Paul Middlin, Employee

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I'm not sure why you need to bring it back into Camtasia? Wouldn't you just record what you're doing in Snagit, with Camtasia? 
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Ron Sanders

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It's a legitimate question.  Sometimes your source files come from outside sources that can't be easily, or quickly, controlled.  This kind of response isn't really helping, no matter how many 'Likes' have been hit.
(Edited)
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coldwhitefire

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So I would be using Camtasia to capture Snagit to show its possible to annotate .gif files. Then export from Camtasia to another .gif and not just .mp4. 

So it's a way to show in a looping export .gif from Camtasia that one can annotate .gif files in Snagit. 
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coldwhitefire

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I also wanted to bring into Camtasia multiple flatten .gif files to then produce a video sequence with steps in one exported .gif file. Like in Premiere one can export a .jpeg sequence. The term 'flattened' comes from Photoshop, when one has 10 layers, and flattens them into one layer. 
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coldwhitefire

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a small .gif file instead of a huge .mp4 video file would save tons of space especially when uploading online when sites don't allow more than 10MB. The screencast I made just recently in Camtasia was 1.27 GB for the project file. The exported .mp4 video file was 766.3 MB. 

Why not allow for a small .gif size to upload the same video in a smaller format that can keep the same resolution and also loops? 

One could show the same steps in a video file in a small looping image file. 

One could bring in a flattened .gif file that has already been created like what @Ron Sanders was talking about. You can't control a .gif sequence in a file that is already flattened. But what about taking multiple flattened .gif files and creating a whole new sequence of flattened .gif files?

So for example, one can annotate in Snagit and create a .gif file that is flattened (or even keeps the sequenced layers) to bring into Camtasia. One can add multiple flattened or sequenced layers into Camtasia to then export as another .gif file?
(Edited)
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Stephen Wagner, Employee

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You are mistaken if you believe that gifs are smaller than mp4.  A gif file of the same resolution, frame rate and duration is going to be many many times larger than the equivalent mp4, and the mp4 will look better because it has a wider range of colors.   https://dougsillars.com/2017/04/12/animated-gifs-vs-video-files/

I am not sure I fully understand your question, but Camtasia does support importing animated gifs.   There is no ability to manipulate the layers within the gif, but you can build up videos with as many layers as you like in Camtasia.  You can also export as an animated gif.

If your goal is to produce a video showing people how to annotate a gif in Snagit, all you need to do is use Camtasia to record your screen as you demonstrate how to annotate a gif in Snagit.  You can then export it as a gif or mp4 or mov.  The gif files will be far larger than the other two.

-Stephen
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Joe Morgan

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I did not realize that Stephen.  Thanks for posting the article and bringing this up.

To be 100% honest, I had a hard time believing either one of you till I ran my own test. "I'm like that" No offense intended.

I selected a very colorful recording segment to test. The mp4 was nearly 400% smaller than the GIF.


Which begs the question???

Why does this forum support GIF uploads of a paltry 2.0 mb and not mp4's instead or both???

Regards,Joe
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Stephen Wagner, Employee

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I am pretty sure the reason GetSatisfaction supports gifs and not mp4 is because gif is actually an image format.  If you allow users to upload images at all, you get animated gif support  for free.  The size limit is for all images, not just animated gifs.   For a static image, 2 megabytes is very generous.  

GetSatisfaction also does not want to be in the video hosting business.  They allow you to link to videos hosted on YouTube, Vimeo, etc. but they do not want to deal with all the hassle of hosting the videos themselves.  

Animated gifs are a weird historical accident in many ways.   

-Stephen
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JMichaelTX

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@coldwhitefire, you said:
showing its possible to use Snagit to annotate .gif files
Are you referring to animated GIF files?  If  so, I have not been able to do that.  So I'd be very interested in your video, or just written instructions on  how to do that.
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coldwhitefire

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animated .gifs would be cool to export from Camtasia also, but annotated .gif just means Snagit is able to add text to a looping .gif file. Why just allow .mp4's?
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Brooks, Camtasia Technical Product Manager

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You can export animated GIFs from Camtasia (2019 and 2020 at least support this). You can set the loop count in Camtasia 2020.