Is it possible to record a program from a TV (via the HDMI port) with Camtasia?

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I have the most current version of Camtasia.
Can I record video (and audio) from a TV via the HDMI cable connected to my Windows PC?
I am making some instructional videos and would like to use some content from ads that appear on TV or some TV shows.
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three_jeeps

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Posted 11 months ago

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Joe Morgan

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If you can get the video to appear on your monitor you can probably record it. If you're recording copyrighted content you are taking a risk because it's illegal in most cases.
A video capture card will allow you capture some HDMI content directly to your computer screen. But a lot of that content is scrambled and un-recordable.

However, If your serious about recording from the television. Your better off just getting a HDMI recorder like HDMI Cloner BOX Pro.  https://www.amazon.com/HDML-Cloner-instantly-schedule-recording-required/dp/B012T1D0IG/ref=sr_1_1?ie...
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Rick Stone

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This comment piqued my interest, as I'd be interested in a way to record broadcast TV as I did on my cable provider DVR before I cut the cable. But upon looking at the link, it appears this device is only intended for capturing something that would be sent to it via HDMI. Such as a game console or possibly a DVD player.

Seems to me that the HDMI connection on the computer is only there to treat a TV as a display device via HDMI. I'm not claiming it's impossible, but I'm not sure I've ever personally seen a TV sending an HDMI signal to a computer. Generally speaking, I think a TV or a monitor is kind of considered to be a "final destination" for the signal.

Then there's a whole other ball of worms that are introduced with HDCP.

Cheers... Rick :)
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three_jeeps

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I know that some HDMI ports are bidirectional.  Early versions of HDMi up to 1.4 were almost always unidirectionl unless the company went the extra step to make it bidirectional...but my understanding here is that it was a unique implementation and not officially a 'standard' till 1.4 and after that companies gradually supported bidirectionality.
The other option is to get an HDMI splitter and run it into the PC. 
The question (for me) still remains can Camtasia capture full resolution video from the HDMI PC HDMI port?
(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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As I said before, you would need a video capture card installed on your computer.
Computers cannot display incoming television signals. A video capture card can.
It allows you to watch it on your monitor. Provided the signal isn't scrambled by a cable or satellite dish company.

https://www.amazon.com/AVerMedia-Definition-Composite-Component-C027/dp/B002SQE1O0/ref=sr_1_3?ie=UTF...

If that's the case, you would need a cloner box to get past the encryption. The cloner box records directly to a flash drive. You select the quality level of recording you want. Encryption doesn't stop this box from recording.You need to download and install software from the company to get it to work. I'm not advising you to use it. I'm just telling you it works.   
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Rick Stone

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Another possibility is to "watch" the program via your web browser. You may be able to visit the broadcaster's site and watch the program via your computer, then record it as it plays. Or, search YouTube or visit iSpot.tv and play the commercials from there. 

Cheers... Rick :)
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kayakman, Champion

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I have Comcast high speed internet; that service enables any content available via your subscription, including on-demand offerings, to be viewed in a browser on a PC, just like on a TV; the Comcast cable modem hooks to a PC via Ethernet or wireless 
(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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Actually, that surprises me.

Comcast being such a large company. I wouldn't expect them to make Pirating moves that simple.
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kayakman, Champion

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personally, I've never seen the point in recording content from such sources; seems a waste of time and effort since you can watch most of it anytime, at your leisure, via the on-demand service

but, for what it's worth, I don't believe I've ever experienced cases where I couldn't capture whatever was playing on the PC screen
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Joe Morgan

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People can rent a New first run movie and record it. Sell it on Blu-Ray's pretty cheap. Before it's released to the public legally and hits the shelves.
 
I'm a little shocked Comcast doesn't protect their content.

I'm thinking if you tried to record a newer movie, you probably can't. 
 
 
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Rick Stone

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I'm pretty sure Comcast works the same as any other cable provider. For example, my mother is a Spectrum customer. As a Spectrum customer, she has a login to the Spectrum system. I think it works as a simple layer of authentication.

For example, if you visit MSNBC using your browser, you can't watch full episodes or the live stream. You have to log in first. That initial login screen looks like below:



And after clicking the little key, this is presented:



So after clicking the cable provider, the user is sent off to be authenticated by the cable provider. And once this is done (assuming it's successful) some kind of handoff occurs and the content is presented.

That seems to suggest to me that any security beyond authenticating with the cable provider is actually implemented on a site by site basis. So while there may be no issues whatsoever in using Camtasia to record MSNBC, should you bounce over to perhaps the Disney Channel site, that site may implement security that prevents recording.

Bottom line is that it likely depends totally on how the individual site has implemented security.

Note that I have not personally attempted to record either of these sites with Camtasia. Although, as a training exercise for Adobe Captivate, the training materials suggest visiting Disney.com and recording some of the video in order to demonstrate recording motion video. I've never seen that one fail, but then again, that's Captivate, not Camtasia.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Joe Morgan

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Piracy on Blu-Ray may be a thing of the past. With sharing online being the new norm.

 I was looking around and new releases of most 4K movies go for around $20 to $30  or less.

But I'm guessing here and have no real first hand knowledge on the current status of things.

A cloner box can steal any movie, encrypted or not. You can even record content to a DVR, save it to a cloner box at your convenience  So it's not like the content is ever protected.

I've heard Apple blocks it's users from recording music from their streaming services. I would imagine there's a hack for that.

I saw a thread in this forum that videos couldn't be captured by Camtasia on some web site. It was due to a blocking feature on the site.Can't remember which thread.

Bottom line, you may have a Cable, Dish or Other Service you can Exploit for recording proposes.

Odds are, you're breaking the law the second you hit that RECORD Button.