Is it possible to reverse/rewind a video clip?

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There are times when it would be helpful if I could reverse a video segment and add it to the timeline. What I'm thinking of would essentially be the video equivalent of mirroring an image. Is there any way to do this in Camtasia? If not, are there other tools that can do this?

Thanks

Brian
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bnystrom

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Posted 3 weeks ago

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Joe Morgan

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Camtasia can't do it.

This free application can. https://video-time-reversal.software.informer.com/2.0/

A lot of people use it. I have Premiere Pro. Which does it natively.

Theres on line tools as well.

Regards,Joe

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bnystrom

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I actually just found and tried one of the online tools and it worked well: https://ezgif.com/reverse-video

I had to download Video Time Reversal from another site, as the link on Software Informer wasn't working, but thanks for the recommendation.
(Edited)
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bnystrom

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Perhaps I'm doing something wrong, but the results I get with Video Time Reversal are not usable. The brightness of the reversed clip is much higher and the resolution is much lower. I tried several settings options and the result is the same.
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kayakman, Champion

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here's a way to do it in Camtasia 2018 ...

How To Capture Clip Playing Backwards In CS 2018 2018-09-15
http://www.screencast.com/t/1eHK4X2iC

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bnystrom

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That's a very creative way of doing it; I'll give it a try.
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bnystrom

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Well, your method definitely works and it the quality of the result is identical to the original. I had to reduce the scaling by 5%, make a 1-pixel vertical and horizontal shift and double the speed, but it looks really good and the transition is invisible.

It's slower than using the reversal tools, but the quality of the result makes it worth the extra time.

Thanks!
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kayakman, Champion

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glad you're able to use that technique; thanks for letting us know
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Joe Morgan

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Well, it would appear that Video Time Reversal 2. May not be that helpful tool that it once was. I’ve seen it praised as the tool to be used in the past, in several posts. I even used it myself, quite some time ago.

So naturally I had to try to figure out what was going on. I had some pretty good results, or so I thought. There was a Buck outside my window today. I picked up my camera and shot a little footage of it. Camtasia 2018 does not like my Nikon camera footage due to a graphics card issue. So I threw the footage in Camtasia 9. Why this matters, I’ll get to that in a moment.

I exported a small portion of the footage from Camtasia’s timeline at 60 percent quality MP4. I ran it through video time reversal 2. The footage lost a little bit of clarity and was actually a little darker than the original. I rendered it to MP4 so that’s to be expected. Then I upped the quality to the highest quality MP4 available. It was only slightly higher in quality and didn’t seem to help.

I was going to show you a side-by-side comparison of the original footage in Camtasia 9. Then, the reversed footage in Camtasia 2018. Well, the reversed footage will not show up in the canvas area of Camtasia 2018. You can place it on the timeline, but Camtasia the 2018 cannot see it.



Whereas Camtasia 9, has no difficulty seeing it whatsoever.


So I went ahead and I threw the 2 videos in Premier Pro. I undocked the preview window and the source monitor. Placing the videos side-by-side. On the same frame respectively. The video was only 4 seconds and 18 frames long. The reversed video was placed on the 18th frame. The original video was placed at the 4 second mark. The detail is not quite as sharp in the reverse video. But I wouldn’t call it a deal breaker either.



I also played around with the online video conversion tool. https://ezgif.com/reverse-video/ezgif-1-3a936e4885e7.mp4

the online converter clearly did a better job. I have DSL and it took about 4 minutes to upload and convert and download that small video. So I’m not saying it’s a high speed option, but if it’s simply running in your browser in the background. How inconvenient is that? To me, it would just be a game of being patient.You could work on other parts of the video. While you wait for the video to go through.



If a consistent frame rate per second with smooth playback is desired. I think you might find the online converter a decent resource.

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bnystrom

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The online tools works, but I found that the transition in quality from the original to the reversed video was too noticeable for my taste. Perhaps that's because I'm making screen recordings of websites, but either way, I'm not satisfied with it. Kayakman's method produces reversed content of the same quality as the original. In your case, where you have a slow internet connection, it would be much faster, too. I feel your pain in that regard, as I recently dumped DSL myself.
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Joe Morgan

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Ha ha, I live in the country. Cable doesn't exist out here. Satellite internet is a ripoff.Plus, it gets disconnected when a storm gets between you and the signal,so I have no pain.

I have Premier Pro and other editing programs that can reverse video.
I don't need the convoluted approaches.
I just like playing around with the options.
I was using high quality DSLR footage, that's probably why it didn't suffer much degradation.