Is there a way to lock the playhead when playing back?

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  • Updated 2 years ago
I would like the playhead to remain in the middle of the screen and have the clips scroll past it. This would keep me from going back and forth with my mouse when editing. Is there a way to do that in Camtasia 9?
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ChrisM

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Posted 2 years ago

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Dubie

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There is no way I have discovered.

Dubie:)
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Bob Lewis

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Interesting Idea.
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Joe Morgan

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It's an interesting Idea.


However, I think it would be like ridding a carnival ride for to long.

I think the motion of the media on the timeline would be to distracting.
 Combined with the media playing on the canvas. I can envision nausea setting in fairly quickly.

So, it wouldn't work for me personally.
 I'm not saying it might not work for someone else. Have a peek.

Regards,Joe

 
 
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Bob Lewis

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Thanks for the sample. That could be distracting.
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kayakman, Champion

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for what it's worth ...

way back when, in the original version of Camtasia [circa 2001], the playhead behaved the way you are wanting

that disappeared in CS2 if I recall correctly

at that time, Microsoft also had a screen capture app that had the playhead stay in the center as the timeline content scrolled by

personally, I liked the original behavior; very intuitive to use and easy to work with

my guess, it was pulled from Camtasia possibly due to patent/copyright issues?

I'd love to see it returned as an optional behavior?
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Joe Morgan

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Well kayakman

To be honest, I cannot imagine why you would want to subject yourself to an antiquated workflow like that.
 
I couldn't even stomach watching the callous and other media whizzing along the timeline while I created that animation.

I can envision adding a simple animation to a callout or image.
Then,
 simultaneously sliding every piece of media on the timeline back and forth, just to adjust the properties of One Image or callout?
You couldn't just move the callout. Not if you want it to remain synced with it's original position on the timeline.

I think some circa old school techniques died for a very good reason.

I enjoyed creating the GIF. Plus, I wanted to prove to myself it wouldn't work for me.
It was a lot of work to create and I'll probably never get to use it again.Here's an encore upload .LOL
 
(Edited)
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kayakman, Champion

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well Joe, in the real world, it actually worked great for me; the sliding timeline of objects let me target my edit locations on the fly

but of course, sliding was stopped while actually commanding an edit

as I recall, many expressed disappointment that the behavior went away 

like I said above, an option to have it both ways would be great; there are many times when I still miss it
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Joe Morgan

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Interesting kayakman,
You said that feature probably disappear with Camtasia CS2. It made me curious.

Sure enough, Camtasia started to become a complex editor with multiple tracks starting with version 3. Here's the basics.

27 June, 2005: Camtasia Studio 3.0.0   Studio
  • Added Picture-In-Picture (PIP) tracks to the timeline. This is a second video + audio track. The PIP video on top of the other video. The PIP video can be resized, positioned, and faded in or out along the timeline.
  • Added the ability to record camera video from a webcam or other camera device attached to the computer.
  • Added title clips which allow for static text on top of a solid background color or background image.
So yeah, maybe that style of editing was a good fit for such a basic editor. I still wouldn't use it if were a feature.Heck, to many callouts flashing by might even trigger an epileptic  fit.LOL   
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ChrisM

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Yes, if you play the whole video with the timeline zoomed in like that it would be terrible. I think that example is a little exaggerated by the action in the video.

I am doing tutorial videos. I mainly edit out breaths, ummms and clip dead space. I have a huge monitor (I know, first world problems) and find myself mousing back and forth and back and forth to make edits or go to the part I just heard. Worst case scenario is when the edit needs to happen RIGHT AT THE TIME the timeline jumps forward. Then I have to rewind to the last section and find it again. This would never happen if the head stayed still. As soon as I heard a breath or ummm, actually my crutch word is "so", I could pause and have 10 seconds of whatever on either side of the play head for a buffer.
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Joe Morgan

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My example is a bit cluttered and not entirely accurate.
That's because I downsized the UI to create the GIF. 2mb GIF cannot be full screen and contain that many frames of information.

 Plus, I would have more tracks of media flying by. That and if it were a truly accurate depiction. The timeline would be on separate monitor because I use dual monitors when I edit video.


If you are only working with 1 or 2 tracks of media without a lot of breaks in-between the clips it might not be that distracting to allow timeline behavior like that.

I'm a little myopic in my views at times.
 I work with 4+ tracks of media in most cases. I use a lot of overlapping images with animations applied to those images.
The images usually appear for a short period of time.
So I'm zoomed into the timeline most of the time. It’s the only way I can time the animations with accuracy.

You might be more pleased with Camtasia if it offered Audio Scrubbing. That’s where you can hear the audio as you move the playhead manually. It makes it easy to pinpoint audio glitches because you can hear the audio as you drag the playhead forward and backward along the timeline.

If you were only working with 1 or 2 tracks of media. A scrolling timeline might not be to distracting.

Anyway you slice it, 
I don't envision Stationary Timeline Indicators & Scrolling Timelines making a comeback.
People were throwing away their VCR's and getting their first DVD players when TechSmith dumped that feature.

Regards,Joe
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ExpertNovice

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My 1 cent.  I *think* I prefer the moving playhead for one single reason.  It is easier for me, based on the provided example, to see exactly where the play head hit a point in time.  Specifically, I can follow the play head, and at the point I'm interested in begin focusing on the sound track.  If the soundtrack is moving I have to begin trying to keep up with the movement until it is stopped.

However, if it were changed, I would simply adapt as the pros and cons seem balanced... other than the distraction factor.  :D

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ChrisM

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I am, indeed working with only a couple tracks. Usually only one actually. I totally get that the stationary play head isn't applicable to everyone. I would like to have the choice added.