Is Camtasia's WAV export 100% losless?

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  • Updated 5 months ago
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To avoid many small fragments on my timeline (which results in excruciatingly slow editor performance), I want to produce a long audio clip from many small audio clips. But the problem is, sometimes I have to replace parts of that audio track because I find a mistake. Let's say that happens 2-10 times per video. Can I produce a new audio clip every time I fix a small piece or should I wait until I have lots of them? In other words, will I get a noticeable loss in audio quality if I export WAV 2-10 times?
The original audio file is exported as 16-bit WAV from Audacity and when I export it from Camtasia I use WAV there as well.
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Florian Walther

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Posted 5 months ago

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Joe Morgan

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In of itself, .wav is lossless format.
So, if you render or export a .wav to .wav. It will remain pristine. No matter how many times you do it.

If you're using the voice narration feature in the Camtasia editor.
It will be saved as a .m4a.
Which is not a lossless format.
However, once exported as a .wav
There will  be no further degradation in subsequent .wav iterations.
I was simply clarifying the difference.

Regards,Joe
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Florian Walther

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Thank you for your answer. For some reason, I have a hard time believing that there will be zero quality loss. Is there some source (by Camtasia) that confirms this? Even if WAV is a lossless format, Camtasia's exporter could still export with loss, right?
(Edited)
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paulwilliamengle

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You may wish to submit a support ticket as it may be a quicker way of getting in front of the dev/engineers who can speak to the Camtasia side of this. 

If you record to 16 bit, 44.1khz WAV and render to 16 bit, 44.1khz WAV in Audacity, you should not experience a loss in quality. 
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Florian Walther

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@paulwilliamengle
And this is also the case if I let Camtasia export it multiple times?
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Joe Morgan

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.wav is a lossless format.
Meaning the digital signal will be duplicated without any changes to it. Therefor, theres no audio data lost.
No quality loss.


By comparison to the format M4a? 
A .wav file is about 10 time larger than an m4a.
 Content matters, so these differences can vary.

That's how a .wav maintains no losses. The data is not compressed.

Typically ,when you produce a video.
The audio data is compressed significantly. Which you only want to do once.
 It will still sound great if not compressed to much.
Compress it again, things go downhill.
Its a bit like reducing the percentage of flavoring ingredients contained in a recipe. You can do it, but it won't taste as good.
Every time you re-produce that compressed recipe. Its compressed yet again, reducing those flavoring ingredients by a greater margin every time.
At some point you arrive at YUCK!
Tastes horrible {:>)


 
There are various settings and different formats available, depending on what program you're using.But I don't want to muddy the waters here.Its a deep subject.
 
Because of file size .............wav's are to large to be practical for use in a finished video.
So its compressed to a smaller size.

For editing purposes, .wav is great.

Thats it in a nut shell {:>)
(Edited)
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Florian Walther

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Alright, thank you for the clarification!