JPG or PNG - which should I use?

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  • Updated 2 years ago
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As a photographer, jpgs are my "go to" image distribution format.  I have been saving and editing my Snagit captures as jpgs since many of my communications are via photographic web sites that only allow jpg images.  

However, due to  some technical problems I had with Snagit, I was using Jing for a while (I got Snagit back, and am happy).  However, I notice that Jing sort of 'prefers' to save in the png format.  It's a tad bit more difficult to save a jpg in Jing, than it is in Snagit.

So my question is, is there some workflow or technical reason for this png preference?  SHOULD I be working in png for some reason and convert to jpg as needed?  FWIW, I have recently purchased Camtasia 9 and am starting to create video tutorials.
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Glen Barrington

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Posted 2 years ago

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Fred Slocombe

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My only concern is png file sizes are much larger than jpg, but the upside is png doesn't have as much noise and incorporates transparency.
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Rick Stone

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Chiming in here with others. I totally love the PNG format. I love the ability to have the transparency as has been mentioned.

I'm probably using the wrong terminology again and I'm sure if I am I'll be shortly corrected and properly and fully chastised, but another aspect of PNG is the ability to have the alpha channel. Where the entire PNG image itself has partial transparency. I find that to be a huge benefit as well.

I've been a huge fan of PNG and have tried using it almost exclusively since it's now commonly accepted across browsers.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Joe Morgan

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Yeah, disk space is not so important these days. Makes a difference with camera storage though. Even memory cards are getting reasonably priced.
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Dubie

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I would somewhat disagree that png is always larger than raw.

It usually varies dependent on the  camera and the raw format.

Image shot with a Canon EOS 5D Mark lll in the DNG format

DNG


Saved PNG  from Photoshop


Saved jpeg from Photoshop
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Dubie

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I would somewhat disagree that png is always larger than raw.

It usually varies dependent on the  camera and the raw format.

Image shot with a Canon EOS 5D Mark lll in the DNG format

DNG


Saved PNG  from Photoshop


Saved jpeg from Photoshop
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Dubie

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Don't know how I got the double post ??  Sorry :)
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Joe Morgan

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I'm not strong on this subject matter but png's get really big if there truly saved as uncompressed.
My Nikon is pretty consistent.18 to 21 MB RAW files on average.
The brighter the colors the higher the Numbers.
I scaled this image down and saved it as a JPEG so you can see what I used for my example.It's actually a 6000 x 4000 RAW file.


In the RAW form it's properties are as follows.


In a compressed form of PNG, the one most people would probably be saving there PNG's with. It's a myth that the average PNG is fully uncompressed.Same goes with AVI video's.A fully uncompressed AVI, 1 min in duration.Would be several GB's,  but that's another story.


Here's the uncompressed version.68.7 Whopping MB's


Different Cameras probably use different algorithms for RAW but you see my point.RAW is what it is.
 PNG is a bit of a crap shoot. If the program you use doesn't give you control over the compression applied.You get whatever file size you get.But programs don't use Fully Uncompressed by default. Uncompressed creates unmanageable file sizes to say the least.But any time you compress a file,you "Are" throwing away information. So there is some edit-ability quality that is lost.
For photographers, the RAW file is the one to keep. 

Regards,Joe
(Edited)
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Robert R., Online Community Admin

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Hi all!

This is a pretty great discussion about an interesting aspect on the technicalities of TechSmith applications! I love it! I will admit though, that I don't have the answer as to why one or the other is used, so I am going to bring it up to the product teams to see what I can come up with; either I or a member of the product team should be getting back as soon as we're able.

Thanks all!

-Robert