Keeping the audio and visual in "record my screen" in sync

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I have done a "record your screen" to walk through some online transactions that I am creating a training tutorial for. The piece is about 4 minutes. When I play it back, the audio and the screen are not sync'd. The screen visual get way ahead of the audio.

How to do I do this to keep the audio and visual recordings on a screen stay in sync?
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Dale Welcome

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Posted 7 years ago

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Amy

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Did you separate the audio from the video by any chance?
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Timbre4, Champion

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That's always tough to get right longer than a minute or two with that methodology.

Are you recordijng Camrec clips or AVI clips? (you can export WAV audio & AVI video from camrec and manipulate them)

If you were (pre-)recording the audio, you'd be able to chop the audio into segments and slide them around to sync to video perfectly. (instead of being held captive to some latency problem in the PC)

My $.02: Trying to somehow get it all right at the same time makes for increased frustration and multiple takes.
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Jeff

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Hi - I think I'm dealing with a similar issue and your answer sounds like it mind be in the ball park.  I need to have someone record the audio first and then I need to create the screencast based on what they say.  I don't know if I should have them record just the audio first and then I create the screencast based on what they are saying, or vice versa.  In either case, I will need to sync both of them.  Do you have any advice for this situation?  Thank you!
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Timbre4, Champion

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Hi Jeff - You will find that getting what you need to say (audio) perfected first goes a LONG way to getting it done right with the least amount of agony! I produce my audio outside with decent gear and then bring it into the Camtasia project timeline.

From my experience, the finished product will benefit from this specific workflow:

1. Write yourself a script while looking at the subject matter

2. Record the audio narration [perhaps several chunks to aid timing it later]

3. Play the audio to guide your movements and timing while recording video

4. Put the video track on the CS 8.x timeline in it's existing form [trim as needed]

5. Import the audio clip(s) and align them to the video; adjust them to your liking

6. Then create any zooms, inserts, text boxes or other contents + add transitions

7. Play all the tracks together and look for anything to tighten up

8. Render a preview to screencast.com and share links for review (your peers may notice things that you don't because you're so close to this project)

9. Make any changes noted - re-render it and repeat peer review perhaps

10. Call it a day

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rkerner

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Agreed with all of the above. And one more tip (if this is part of some larger or re-usable project): You can render the screen footage after you've got it synced up, and then re-import this new perfect version as an MP4 clip, and it will be much easier to work with.
Rick
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Jeff

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Hi Rick,

Thanks for this input. I'm new to CS so this is a bit above my knowledge at this point, but I will definitely save this for future use. I think I just need to dive in and get more experience. I appreciate your help. - Jeff
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Timbre4, Champion

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That is definitely a good tip and makes it easier to continue working with. I would suggest rendering to AVI clip instead to retain quality as long as possible and avoid applying compression twice. The AVI clip will play and behave like an mp4 would and look sharper. Then when *everything* is ready, render to mp4 as a final output. 
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Jeff

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Hi - thanks for you input. Can you tell me how I can listen to the audio while I record the screen? I can see how recording the audio in chunks would make it easier to adjust later! Also, do you recommend recording the audio with CS or with Audacity and then importing to the timeline? Thanks. -Jeff
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Timbre4, Champion

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I have been using (SONY) Sound Forge for 10+ years to record and edit audio. When an audio file segment is ready to recording screen clips with CS, I add a 5 second blank pre-roll so that I can start it playing (in Sound Forge) and then trigger CS countdown 3-2-1 and be pretty close time wise. (easy to optimize on timeline later)

This is fairly simple with two screens, can be done with single screen with practice. You can put in a 10 second pre-roll to give yourself more time to Alt-Tab between program screens. (you simple close the audio file w/o saving and the pre-roll silence disappears before you put it on the timeline)

I try my best not to give Adobe any money whatsoever; a lite version of Sound Forge studio is about $65 or less on a good day.

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