Let's talk about Camtasia on native Linux since it's been a few years

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The last thread about adding Linux support was about 4 years ago. Times have certainly changed since then.

Right now, it's extremely viable to run Linux as your primary OS.

A lot of multi-media tools have started to create official Linux ports of their applications:



Right now I mainly run Windows because let's be real here. Camtasia is one of the best products available to edit screencast style videos and creating screencasts is what I do. It just so happens I create screencasts for programming tutorials, and I would much rather be using native Linux instead of Windows.

Now, I know I can set up a KVM based GPU passthrough VM to run Windows and then run Camtasia inside of that to do my editing, while I use OBS or ffmpeg directly to do the actual recording on Linux. It can be done, but it's a much less efficient workflow and complicates things 100 fold.

In my opinion, it's only a matter of time before tooling on Linux catches up to the point where Camtasia won't even be the best tool around for editing screecnasts. High quality video editing tools are already available on native Linux such as https://www.blackmagicdesign.com/products/davinciresolve/. Granted that's more suited towards "real" camera editing instead of screencasts, but it's an extremely polished application.

So instead of ditching Linux support entirely, why not join in and keep your customers around and happy?

I'm already considering not purchasing another Camtasia upgrade because after I finish my next course I am going native Linux, and I'm going to use other tools as an alternative to Camtasia, and only fall back to using Camtasia in a GPU passthrough VM if I run into trouble.

This post isn't meant to be an ultimatum or being hostile. I want to continue using Camtasia and I want to continue spending my money to support the company, but I do no want to use Windows or MacOS anymore.

Surely I'm not the only one in this position? Who else would love to ditch Windows for Linux and is only held back by Camtasia?

Also as a fellow developer I know it's not as easy as "just add Linux support, it's already there for Windows and MacOS!". I recommend just creating an official Linux package for Debian / Ubuntu and support that, and let other distros create their own packages around that -- at least at the beginning. You don't need to support every distro imaginable from day 1.
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nick.janetakis

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Posted 10 months ago

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Ed Covney

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Nick, Nick, Nick . . . What programs run under Linux? Old programs that Microsoft put to sleep years ago? The Unix, Linux, Ubuntu "user" community are . . . folks who want everything but are willing to pay nothing. I'm 70 and learned 40+  years ago that, your community is dead to anyone wanting to make a living in computers, OSes or software.  Hobbyists are cool though!
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nick.janetakis

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I'm not sure what you mean by asking what programs run under Linux? The last time I checked Debian has around 50,000+ packages available to be installed that cover a wide range of functionality.

You know, about 2 years ago I personally reached out to TechSmith to help fund Linux development but my request was shut down.

There's plenty of professionals doing development and Hollywood-level audio and video processing on Linux. It's well beyond only for hobbyists.

I've also bought a Camtasia license and have no moral issue with paying for software if it's high quality and maintained. I think your assumption of what the Linux community is about is slightly jaded.
(Edited)
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Ed Covney

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"Debian is an operating system and a distribution of FREE Software. It is maintained and updated through the work of MANY USERS who volunteer their time and ..."

Windows and IOS have a vested interests in maintaining stable platforms for all third party software. Each provides enormous amount of resources to make sure of that. (There's a good story about Mark Russinovich on Wiki. He's the guy who cracked the Win 2K kernal, so they hired him immediately - he's also one smart fellow!)

Who's responsible for that in the Linux community? Ans: thousands of independent developers? Each of whom may have downloaded the kernel, modified it to: 1-suit their fancy, 2-play with it because they can, 3-study the code to see if can help ME in my Windows developments. I have a vested interest in keeping it open sourced, TS (shouldn't, can't, won't - pick one) even spend one second considering a Linux development until someone with very deep pockets, takes ownership and never again allows open source inspection or alteration. In 1976-1979 it may have been possible (Gates & Jobs did it), but today "possible" has departed.

30 years ago, I contracted with Porter Data Systems to do work for Gates Rubber and U.S. West - all HP Unix ("HP-UX", proprietary version), and one of a kind developments - that's where Unix/Linux have a niche.
HP has a version of Unix that is stable, controlled, available, and COSTLY. How many people would buy an HP-UX  > $10K, (+ $15K/year maintenance) and use it for Camtasia captures knowing they have a market of ZERO possible users? 

Russinovich is one of my favorite people:
https://www.wired.com/2014/05/mark-russinovich/
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mark_Russinovich


(Edited)
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nick.janetakis

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The responsibility typically depends on what distro you use. Each distro has their own rules.  Look at something like Nvidia too. They offer proprietary drivers on Debian and it's working out for them. TS doesn't need to make Camtasia open source to be successful on Linux.

Personally I've never seen a platform more stable than Debian. Even on a well maintained Windows 10 box I have to reboot due to ridiculous things from time to time and overall system performance degrades over time because the Windows registry is a huge ball of hacked up insanity.

I'm not sure what $10,000 HP machines from 30 years ago have to do with running Camtasia on Linux today but realistically I opened this thread hoping TS will understand that their competitors are accepting Linux. In the end, I'll use whatever tools help me be productive. If that means switching to Linux and buying or donating to / supporting another screencast editing tool, so be it.
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Ed Covney

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".. The responsibility typically depends on what distro you use."  WHAT? 
" . . Each distro has their own rules."  WHAT, WHAT, WHAT? 
Yep, there's a platform I wanna dedicate my life to!" What company is responsible for windows XP? Vista, 8? 8.1?, .. 10.809.xxxx?  Nick - please stop, you're embarrassing yourself to no end. 
BTW the current version of HP-UX is supported thru 2025. But you wouldn't know that because you only deal in FREE stuff, right?
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nick.janetakis

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> But you wouldn't know that because you only deal in FREE stuff, right?

I don't only deal with free stuff.

I purchased Camtasia, Windows 10 Pro and countless other software over the years. For free software I often donate money to them because those tools helped me out a lot and I want to do what I can to support the developers so they can continue doing what they love.

Likewise, I open source a lot of my own work and spend most of my time giving away knowledge for free (in the form of blog posts and video tutorials).

I'm still not sure what you're going on about. You realize we're not enemies right? I just wanted to let TechSmith know that their competitors are supporting Linux and there are people out here who want Camtasia to work under Linux. In fact, a TS employee told me to post here back when I talked about Linux support years ago.
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Brian Nystrom

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With all of the issues that TechSmith needs to resolve with their current products, the last thing I'd want to see them do is waste their time porting their apps to a platform that has less than 2% of the desktop/laptop market. An enthusiastic user base doesn't mean that a product will be commercially viable. Heck, they would be better off to port it to Chrome OS which has more than double the market share of Linux, yet nobody is suggesting that.
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nick.janetakis

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Maybe I've gotten lucky. With Camtasia 9 I can't really complain. It doesn't crash and I've recorded many dozens upon dozens of hours of video with it.

I haven't upgraded to 2018 mainly because nothing about the release appealed to me. Does it have a lot of issues?

You can't really measure market share like that by the way because the context of what the device is used for makes a big difference. For example, most Chromebook users aren't professionals looking to create custom video content. They just want a browser on the go.

If you want to use that logic, Android is running some version of the Linux kernel under the hood and there's 2+ billion active devices world wide. It's one of the most popular devices on planet Earth.
(Edited)
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Ed Covney

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" . .  Android is running some version of the Linux kernel under the hood .."
Sure .. and so is IOS and Windows. If you refuse to research (i.e learn the history of OS's, then what Jobs and Gates did in the late 70's will be forever lost on YOU. You'll never amount to anything except an asker of very stupid questions. SO,  It's not what's under the hood but how WHAT's under the hood that is protected. 
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Brian Nystrom

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Fair enough with regard to Chrome OS and Android, but the point is that there is no significant market for a Linux version of Camtasia, at least not a big enough market to justify the development time and money involved and diverting resources from development of their Windows and Mac products.

BTW, I don't think your suggestion was "stupid", just impractical from an economic standpoint. I don't understand what Ed is so worked up about...
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Ed Covney

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OK guys my bad, I'm sorry.  I should have been more succinct. I should have asked Nick what programs cost money and are sold retail to Unix users? Rather than citing a single one, Nick produced a Unix freebie (Debian) and noted that he purchased Camtasia for Windows.
Nick - I know you're not the enemy so let's stick to areas we agree on. New Orleans got robbed 10 days ago and I'm not even a Saints fan.
(Edited)
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nick.janetakis

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For the record, I did include multiple examples of audio / video programs being sold to Linux users. REAPER ($60-$225 depending on the license) and DaVinci resolve ($299).

I also linked to an Adobe source where about 10,000 individuals wanted to get Premiere officially supported on Linux (paid no doubt), and it caused enough ruckus for Adobe to re-evaluate if whether or not they will move forward with supporting it.
(Edited)
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Ed Covney

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You posted this and changed your original post 4 minutes ago. You never mentioned Reaper or DaVinci before 5 minutes ago. What should I think?
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nick.janetakis

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The original thread I opened had them in there since I originally posted it yesterday. I have no idea why it says I edit it a few minutes ago. I think the updated label is just misleading because the "updated" is the lastest activity in the thread such as new comments or replies, not the last time it was edit (even though it says edit right after it).

Feel free to contact TS and ask them to publicly display the edit log on that original post if you want. I only edit it yesterday a few times to fix a few typos. The quotes and links to other programs was the main premise of the post.
(Edited)