Looking for recommendations for a computer to run Camtasia, either Mac or Windows

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We are needing to do some basic and simple edits on some lecture capture recordings from our institution, things like deleting specific sections (time wise), adding a opening title slide, and some basic transitions such as fade between clips. Looking for some recommendations for purchasing a new computer to dedicate to this task. The computer can be either Windows or Mac. Currently we use both a Windows 7 with an i5 and 12GB RAM and a Macbook Pro i5 with 8GB RAM. Both of these are several years old. The goal is to have a dedicated computer that can do the work in less time.
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raymond.steinbart

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Posted 3 years ago

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wayne

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They should both be fine to do what you are needing to do.
Unless you are going to get into some HUGE projects.
I did one a few weeks ago to bogged down my i5 and then I tested the same project with an i7 processor in my laptop, and it still took a load.

Anything that has a graphics card with a lot of dedicated memory.
8GB+ RAM
i5 (2Ghz of higher processor)
i7, if you can get it.

The windows 7 system, you might be able to upgrade the CPU in it, rather cheap.
I purchased the i7 from eBay, it cost about $45.00

What is the make and model of your Windows 7 system?
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raymond.steinbart

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It is a Dell 7010. Both computers have SATA drives, but the Mac has a small SSD as the primary drive. Both have the stock factory video cards (so the Mac has both integrated and discrete graphics, the Dell has whatever Dell put into this model).
We are looking to get a new system that would be dedicated to doing this type of work. We are getting by for now with these two systems (the Mac is my personal machine, the Dell is the institution's). The amount of editing we will be doing will also be increasing as time goes by.
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wayne

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OK.
System Specs for the DELL.
Max Ram = 16GB

Need to find out what Processor you have, and Video card you have.

Click on "Start" | "Run"
Type in: dxdiag

The front page will give you information on your CPU
The Display 1 tab, will give you information on your graphics card.
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wayne

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CRUCIAL, states that it will go up to 32GB of RAM.
So, I am uncertain which is more accurate on this one.
Dell, or CRUCIAL?
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raymond.steinbart

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Just checked the Dell, it has Intel HD Graphics card (must be the integrated card) with 1696MB Ram and AMD Radeon HD 7570 with ATI Display adaptor and 4095 MB Ram
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wayne

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The Radeon HD 7570, is showing it only has 1GB of Ram. But your system is showing something different.
What is the Processor that you have?
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wayne

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Download this (CPU-Z) http://www.cpuid.com/softwares/cpu-z.html
Click on the (Zip, 2nd download option)
Unzip, and run it.
Click on the Tools Ellipse Button
And choose to [Save Report as .HTML]

You can send it to me here.
promo@darkeffects.net

This will give me the information on your board, and I will be able to find out what it will upgrade to.
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pjonesCET

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With the Modern Operating system on Mac and PC, would not get a Machine with less than 16GB and if you can 32 GB be it PC or a Mac .
Although am born and will die a Mac user.  Frankly speaking if you have got to do very complex work you would be better off  (cough, cough) with a PC.

Why? Because as with all software companies because of the number of Mac users to PC Users, the Mac users always get the shortened end of the stick. The PC version of Camtasia has a richer feature set.

If your satisfied with the Mac version now and can wait to September there will be a 32gb version of the MacBook Pro. And The Retina Display will be unbelievable (flat knock your socks off)  Also you will pay for it but you can get to to a 2TB SSD.  The disadvantage is that Apple decide to only us a a USB3/thunderbolt  3 input for peripherals  so you have buy a boat load of adapters for USB 3, FireWire and other connectors.
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wayne

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@pjonesCET
One of the reason's for the issue with MAC is you have to take them system's in to have them worked on, upgraded, or whatever done to them. (My son has one we are getting ready to sell - Macbook Pro, 8GB Ram, New Motherboard, 1TB drive, and more)
And besides that, the parts are so blasted expensive, that PC components are the cheapest investment to make, for a better quality system. (In my opinion on the quality)

There is a guy I have been watching on YouTube for several years now, named Ryan. His channel is called: FilmRiot (Just celebrated One million subs).
He is a diehard Mac user.
However, he found out that it was going to cost around $15,000.00 for the MAC System, and HP had one that cost around $5,000.00, and the HP system was faster all the way around than the mac, and would upgrade higher than what the mac would.

If MAC wants to compete in this market, of PC vs MAC.
They need to think about a better built and easily accessible system.
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pjonesCET

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It's not only Mac but PC people are seeing it too, the demand for strong faster running system extremely long Battery life, and  and thin to the Point you can almost fold it up like sheet of paper.  So thing get thinner. I not a fan of making everything  glued down paper thin and parts not user up-gradable. But I worked for a school system for about 17 years We had about amount of Window/Dos PC's to Mac plus some commodore, TI-88's for the K-3 kids. I was find out I was replacing Hard Drives CD Drives Mother Board about 95 PC and  Mac. We didn't have issues on Mac with Malware. From about 1994  until I had to retire in 2004 I replace two Hard Drives, on Mac's. On PC if I had kept all the hard drives I had to replace on PC's I  coul have glued then to walls of classroom and used the like wall paper.

I had to constantly reload system on PC machine because some talented students would get bored and mess with the Autoexec.bat and config.sys files (I'd even lock them so they could be tampered with. But in a Day or two I'd be back again.  I don't know how many copies of Norton Tools I wore out.

I don't know about the fellow and the 15 Thousand Dollar system. I can customer order an iMac with 27" monitor built in with 32 GB of memory a 2 GB SSD and an i7 processor and have the older inputs including SD card slot for Camera. USB 3 and Firewire  and the latest spec for internet. For about $3000.00. My very first Mac I ever bough a SE/30 under an Education program cost me $6000.00  (that included AppleCare, that extended warranty for 3 years with free phone support. It lasted me 7 years Most PC's are badly outdated and ready to throw on Trash heap in 2-1/2 - 3 years. If you get a name Brand such as Dell maybe another year or so.

It all depends on your experiences.   But the fact is the PC version of Camatasia  has a richer feature set. 

I am not railing against PC or for Mac. You use what you want, what you have better experiences with.

What I rail against in software companies not equalizing the features so you have identical feature set with just minor adjustments for the UI. Instead of the attitude that mac Users just play around with their machine and don't do serious work.

I don't fork out $3-6000  just play on. If all I wanted to do is play games or  read mail or scan web browsers I could go to my local OfficeMax and buy HP or Asius(?) or other brand for$300.00 - 400.00 , or very low end Dell for $600.

So anyway If the need to to do very complex work get a PC with the PC version of Camtasia. Maybe even Camtasia studio. He will be much better satisfied.



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susannemistric

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My late 2015 iMac i7 4 Ghz 16 gigs ram and my mid 2010 MBP i7 both handle video editing tasks flawlessly. It has been my experience that similarly equipped Windows machines do not perform as well...not even close. When it comes to any type of video work, I much prefer a Mac. I create screencasts on a PC when I need to, but I do the editing on a MAC whenever I have a choice. The fact that my mid2010 MBP still has resale value says it all. I've never had a Windows machine that wasn't obsolete or dead in 4 years max.
(Edited)
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Paul Middlin, Employee

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Hi Wayne,
Regardless of which platform you choose, you should be in good shape with a midlevel equipped computer. You don't need to spend $15k, or even $5k, to edit and produce with Camtasia. I do recommend having a decent and well-supported graphics card, and an SSD. The hard drive thrashing is one of the biggest speed improvements you can get going with SSD. Expect it to suddenly die one day, so back up, but enjoy the speed in the mean time.

If you go with PC, just don't cheap out on the parts you use, to reduce the "weird stuff is happening" effect with ill-supported drivers.
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wayne

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Hi, Paul.
That was not what I was saying.
I was talking about the difference between Mac and PC on cost.
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wayne

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Hi, Susan.
You are right, PCs do not keep a resale value, that has been common knowledge for years.
Reason: You can do whatever you want with a PC, upgrade it when you choose.
With a MAC, at least in my experience with my son's MacBook Pro.
It is expensive to do upgrades on them, compared to a PC.
So not that many people mess with trying, except those that do not care about breaking the warranty.
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susannemistric

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I've never had a single issue with either of my Macs. Not one...My PCs on the other hand...well, fortunately now I'm down to just one PC that I have to have to create some tutorials. I tutor College students in WEB and Graphic Design, and I teach online. I think the fact that Macs are proprietary is what makes them so dependable. I always recommend MACs to my students when they ask. So far I've never had one come back and say they wish they hadn't gone with a MAC.
(Edited)
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wayne

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It all comes down to what you are used to using.
Myself, I did some lesson's on Mac when my son first got it.
I did not like the interface at all.
I prefer PC myself.
But, it is all on what you are most comfortable with.

You said you have never had an issue with yours?
My son had nothing but problems with his.
At first, we thought it was user error. (Him messing up)
But nope. Took it to the local Apple store, and they determined it was driver issues with the OS. So they had to reinstall that thing about 6 times over the course of 2 years. Once there, and then 3 times over the phone, and the last 2 times, I reinstalled it through watching online videos on the matter.
It is to the point, that my son hates it now, and we are getting ready to sell it.
The last time we took it in, they replace the Motherboard and the hard Drive.

I have been using PC's since 1999 when I got my first one.
Love it, will not use anything else.

I am working with LINUX now, the new OS seems to be right nice. It does remind me of a MAC. But I remind myself that it is a LINUX Mint 18.

And Susan, glad to see that you are teaching these kids how to design.
That is the main field to go into these days. As computers are our future.
If you do not know how to do something on the computer, chances are, you are not going to get a good paying job, anymore.

Take care.
Wayne
(Edited)
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Paul Middlin, Employee

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Just to help keep us on topic, I believe raymond was originally asking what specs he should shoot for on either platform. Do you have what you need, @raymond.steinbart?
(Edited)
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raymond.steinbart

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Thank you to all who took the time to share their thoughts. Most of this was what we expected. I don't want to get into the Win vs Mac wars (personally, I use and am comfortable with either, a sort of technological agnostic, if it works, that is all I care about). The comments will be taken into consideration as we move forward in our project.

In Christ's Service,
Ray