Most "versatile" resolution for multiple end-users?

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Hello!
Is anyone familiar enough with projectors to recommend a good and balanced resolution for videos to be most likely to display well, regardless of the projector being used?
I'm currently tasked with creating a short video presentation that will be used by a couple dozen different individuals before their professional education classes.
After collecting some info, it seems that all of them will be using projectors (of a wide variety), hooked up to laptops, to play the video.
I'm seeing that most projectors have a "native resolution" but are scalable to different display modes.

Thanks so much
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jimflory

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Posted 2 weeks ago

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Joe Morgan

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Well, 4K video projectors have only been around for only a couple of years. So the odds you need to create native 4K videos is extremely low.
In the case of 4K television sets.A high quality 4K television up-scales 1920 x 1080 content to 4K with great success.Making 1920 x 1080 an acceptable format for most situations.

A 1920 x 1080 video will look best at that resolution.
However, it will downscale to 1280 x 720 or lower and look great as well.

Whereas if you produce at 1280 x 720 or lower.And upscale to 1920 x 1080 for full HD projector users. The video is going to look softer and not as sharp.

So if it were me, I would go with 1920 x 1080.
For people showing the videos, I would prefer downloading them.That will ensure smooth playback due to large file sizes and  slow internet speeds were applicable.

Regards,Joe
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Rick Stone

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One thing to beware of with projectors is that there are still quite a few of them out there that use the old 4x3 aspect ratios. And for those, normally the 1024x768 resolution works well.

Each year I create and present media during a fundraiser concert and the venue is always changing. So it's rather critical to pay an early visit so I can assess the projection system in order to determine if 4x3 or 16x9 is the preferred format.

Here's another heads up. Not that I have any solution to offer, but it's something I've recently encountered personally. And if anyone knows WHAT to do for the situation, I'd dearly love to learn how to overcome it.

I was making a presentation at a conference. They had configured two very large TVs on either side of the stage platform. Each was connected via HDMI to some kind of a distribution splitter box. At the podium was a single HDMI cable to connect to the PC. When I connected up, the display appeared but had a very odd looking pinkish and blueish hue to it. Dreadful! I normally carry an HDMI cable and I tested by directly connecting my laptop to one of the TVs. No issue at all. Picture perfect. So that seemed to suggest an issue with that HDMI splitting or distribution device.

I might have thought it was just my laptop. But another presenter using a Mac had the very same issue. Yet other PCs seemed to work just fine. Go figure.

Bottom line is that I ended up using a borrowed PC for the presentation as nobody could figure out how to overcome the issue.

Cheers... Rick :)
(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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So are you suggesting that a 1920 x 1080 video looks worse on a 4:3 monitor than a 1280 x 720 video?
Because the question is.............Is anyone familiar enough with projectors to recommend a good and balanced resolution for videos to be most likely to display well, regardless of the projector being used?

As far as the splitter goes. You should be using a powered HDMI splitter when splitting to separate monitors.As the signal strength from one port of the computer isn't strong enough to carry 2 monitors.
That's why theres multiple outlets and different powered graphics cards for multiple monitor support.

Ideally, using a computer with native dual monitor support would be better.Even if you have to get your hands on a cheap used desktop.

https://www.amazon.com/d/TV-Splitters/HDS-102-Splitter-Certified-Duplicate-Resolutions/B00F5R9TNM/re...

Regards,Joe

If the cables are to long, it may be a factor.
(Edited)
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rg

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I was wondering about the HDMI issue -- thanks for clarifying.

The issue is rarely resolution if you're using 1080p video -- but if the playback has to be 4x3 then the faces start looking a bit gaunt.  But if you made the video as 1024x768 (4:3) then a projector that offers only 16:9 ratio will squash people.  It's like having a choice between Laurel or Hardy.
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Rick Stone

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Actually I just did a show on Saturday with 150 foot CAT 5 cable using HDMI extenders. Worked a treat.

https://www.amazon.com/AVUE-HDMI-EC200-Extender-single-Cat5e/dp/B00O178K0A/ref=asc_df_B00O178K0A/?ta...

I'm guessing that these things boost the signal as each end required power.

I have experienced problems before with HDMI that was simply too long and the port was unable to properly power things. Oddly, a VGA cable of the same length worked just fine.
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Rick Stone

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rg, your comment about the distortion is interesting. I've not really tested or experienced a projection system that is  only 16x9 myself. and had it distort the video

But I know that the system I used over the weekend was 16x9. I've also seen many other folks presenting on 16x9 where they are sending 4x3 (typically via PowerPoint) and when that happens it seems that instead of the distortion, I see PillarBoxing occur.

Likewise, presenting 16x9 on 4x3 systems seems to always result in LetterBoxing.

I have no doubt that distortion occurs though as I see it on a regular basis. Most commonly with broadcast TV. My TV is wide screen and some of the local stations present old programs, such as Barney Miller, Johnny Carson and suchlike. And while there is PillarBoxing, there is also often distortion.

I guess the bottom line is the old saw that Your Mileage May Vary? LOL
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rg

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Yeah, a lot of old Columbo episodes on Comcast have contributed some weight to my wife's favorite detective.