My video comes out small. I know it's been asked before, but my problem is different

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My video comes out small. I have the latest version of Camtasia, I shot the videos in 1920x1080 with my Samsung S10 ( I did check the settings before shooting ) and the video comes out in 1920x1080 (this is what I can see in details, in properties). But it is very  small in any video player, and on youtube and facebook. If I fill the canvas it's gonna come out normal, but it's also gonna change the resolution to a very low one, like 848/504. What can I do? Help, please 
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entinel_entinel

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  • frustrated :(

Posted 2 months ago

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dmey503

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It looks like you have a 4K monitor, correct? If so, then it looks like in the second screenshot you're not zoomed in at 100 percent but maybe 75 percent? The full-size 1080p video (1920x1080) on a 4k monitor (3840x2160) should take up a quarter of your screen. 

VLC player has a lot of settings and it saves the settings after each session. I'd check those out to make sure it's playing at 100 percent. 

If you fill the screen on a 4k monitor with a 1080p video, it's not going to look as clean as it does when only zoomed in 100 percent. You're quadrupling the area of the video at that point and quality will suffer. 

In YouTube, it's going to come in at whatever size fits your monitor or device best. To play it at the rendered size, you have to select the settings from the video's playbar, and change the quality to 1080p. Otherwise, it might fluctuate between 480 or 720p or jump to 4k if you hit full screen. 

To be honest, I would stop filming at 60 frames per second--especially if it's just a video of someone talking. There's no need for that many frames lol. I'd recommend filming at 4k and at 24-30 fps if you want a very clean and crisp video when zoomed in all the way on a 4k screen, although I personally don't think it's worth the much-higher file size or the hassle of editing 4k video if it's just someone talking.  

Also, you can film at the highest quality settings possible but whenever you upload your video to a hosting service like YouTube, Vimeo or Facebook, it's going to significantly reduce your bitrate. When I film 4k at 100 mbps (24-30 fps with a shutter speed of 1/50-1/60), my video's bitrate gets reduced to around 40 mpbs. You can barely tell the difference though. 

(Edited)
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entinel_entinel

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Thanks for you answer! Any other video is played normally, and they fill the screen. Only the video produced by Camtasia doesn''t. And not only on VLC, but on any other player. And any other videos are played normally. Also, when Camtasia finishes producing it with the Smart player, it send me on a webpage and plays it - still small... :(
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dmey503

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I see the problem now. I think...but I also know the solution! I didn't notice it before but it looks like in your first screen shot, your video canvas is much larger (perhaps 4k?) than your video. That is why only this single video will not fill the screen like the other videos. If you drop a 1080p video clip (scaled at 100 percent) onto a 4k canvas, when all that empty region around the video clip will be encoded into your rendered video. In other words, you ended up with a video that wants to play at 4k, even though 75 percent of the video is just the black background of the canvas. 

Right-click on the canvas area of your video and open up "Project Settings". Make sure the width is 1920 and the height is 1080. I recommend keeping the canvas dimensions at the same size as your primary video clips when scaled at 100 percent. In your case, that would be 1080p. :)





(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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I think may know the problem?
This issue has 2 posts associated with it.I'm using clues from both to come to this conclusion.

You have cropping applied to the video on the first track. So cropping dictates video size.

I took your screen shot that shows that cropping is applied. The canvas area is set to 100% zoom in the image. So if the screen shot is unaltered. "Not Re-sized".
The pixels depicted in the image should represent actual Video Dimensions.

So using Photoshop.I set cropping to a 16x9 aspect ratio/widescreen format.
I set the cropping size by width.Because the Camtasia "side" cropping handles are the only ones visible. The  aspect ratio is locked, so height dimensions  are applied/handled automatically.
 I zoomed in tight to get an accurate crop reading. It would have  847x476 if I had cropped it. Which is very close to the dimensions VLC media player has analyzed.



This could explain why the video appears so small placed on a 1920x1080 canvas.I hope}:>)

You can see the crop bounding box and dimensions highlighted in the Photoshop screen shot.
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Joe Morgan

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Even if theres no actual cropping applied. The image should still depict the actual size of the video.
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dmey503

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What size did you originally film at? Do you have a 4K copy of that original video? If so , you can salvage a 1080p video that isn't enlarged. 

And when you say "fill the canvas" do you mean 'fit to canvas"? Those are two different things. "Fit to visible" wraps your canvas around your video clip by either shrinking or enlarging the canvas. Filling the canvas enlarges the video itself.

If you want to crop that much of your frame, you might as well reduce your canvas to 480 p (480p = 852x480) and then either crop or enlarge to make it fill the entire region. If you want to crop that much out and render a 1080p video, you'll have to increase the scale beyond 200 percent. 

Even if you do that and render at 1080, the quality will be reduced. You can't increase the scale beyond the original video size and not lose quality. 

From a filming perspective, here are a few tips: 
- Film at 4k on your S10. Then you can crop out a 1920x1080 region that fills the entire frame. I always film at 4k, even for 1080p videos. I'd rather scale down a video in size than scale it up.
- If you're using a smartphone to film, stand closer to the camera. Smartphone cameras are great for selfies but suck for filming objects more than a few meters away.
- Consider investing a cheap point and shoot camcorder that has an optical zoom. Then you can stand further back. Or be like me and spend all your money on overpriced photo and video equipment lol 


(Edited)