Need to change Media Library location to another drive due to space issues on main C drive

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Sirs, I have small C "SSD" drive just for "application" installs and large D drive for all other GROWING folders. I am close to FULL on C drive. I had to install Camtasia 9 and imported my Camtasia 8 media library files into 9 which is ALL on the C drive (the Media file is located on my C drive under "ProgramData").  

In addition, the auto-saves folder is also on C and so have two areas that will grow.  I have plenty of room on my D drive.   How can I take full advantage of your great program with both of these great "Features" on my soon-to-be-full drive?  I need some way to move that directory to the D Drive.  I have successfully moved the RECORDING files to D drives but these other two areas I could not figure it out.  Is there some registry setting I could use? Some Config file?  Some DLL?  

Please point me in the  right direction.  (I work comfortably in the registry).  I have been with Camtasia for years and own both versions of MAC and Windows (SNAGIT and Camtasia).  I know this is a known issue from previous versions... was just hoping it had been worked out since I am now almost out of space.   Any help is greatly appreciated.  

Sue
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Mrs.Notetaker

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  • hopeful

Posted 1 year ago

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Mrs.Notetaker

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I can see no response on this. Another idea... I just thought maybe I can install Camtasia to my D (LOCAL) drive and that would solve my problems.  Is this a possibility?  I have researched and seen same question years back and not sure if that is still the case today..  
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Dubie

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Though I have never had to try it I did some research and it is possible. Usually.

There are a few important things to note though.

The registry must be void of any reference to the program before installing on another drive
and if you ever have to reinstall Windows than the programs will not work after that.

Again because the registry will be empty of those programs from the new install.

Here's a page you may want to look over. Check the second answer down.
https://superuser.com/questions/512217/can-i-install-all-my-applications-on-d-drive

Just to be safe I would maybe discuss this with support.

Opening a support ticket at:
https://support.techsmith.com/hc/en-us

Or you can call:

Toll Free:
800-517-3001 (U.S. & Canada Only)

Monday through Friday
8:00 AM to 7:00 PM EST

Chat with Support:
https://support.techsmith.com/hc/en-us/

Monday-Friday
6:00 AM to 9:00 PM ET

Saturday
12:00 PM to 4:00 PM ET.

:)
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Mrs.Notetaker

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Thank you.   This is doable on my part and i will contact TechSmith too.   Sue 
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Maria

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I also hope to get a prompt answer from TechSmith regarding this problem. I have the same setup as the original poster.
I have many users with their own Windows profiles who log on to the computer to work with Camtasia 9. I would like to know how to change the default directory for recordings automatically for all users.

Thank you in advance,
Maria
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Joe Morgan

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You cannot move the Library folder to another drive. Camtasia won't know where to find it.It's not built to work that way.

However, there is a way to still build a sizable library and keep it's file size under control. When you add content to the library. You want it to be stored on another drive "First"...... before importing it into Camtasia's media bin.

Then,when you add it to the Library.
 You will need "Link To Content" as the default setting in preferences.


If you wanted to. You could even export the entire Library. Unzip it to the other drive by changing the file extension to .zip
Delete the entire Library.
Then import all the assets and add them to the timeline.Add them to the Library and name them one by one.
That would be a lot of work, but it's doable.

The Default Library is rather small. I don't use it's content myself. You can keep or delete what you want of it.

It's what you add to library that makes it unmanageable for small SSD's to handle.

Here's what media properties look like once you've linked content to the library. As opposed to copying to the Library.



 

Regards,Joe

Everything linked to the library will be nothing more than a Tiny bit of data in a XML file stored in the Library's folder.

(Edited)
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Dubie

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I could see this working.
Good idea.

As you said,  some work up front but good for space saving and part of a backup plan.


Just a little tip to save some time

If you use 7-Zip you can extract the libzip files without changing the file extension to zip.
(Edited)
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Mrs.Notetaker

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Thank you Joe.  I will give this a try. I am going to have quite a few projects needing the same library assets and so I think this might work.  Many other applications allow users to use secondary drives for media, cache etc...giving them the choice.  

Another concern:    I am worried though about creating the projects and then moving them off to a backup drive.  Do I need to worry about the paths to the linked media if I have to open an archive project?  I  have not used LINKING  and so concern about the gotchas.  Any suggestions or best practices?  (I just read another post that there is even problems with TechSmith not using "relative" paths but uses "absolute" paths causing problems if projects get moved.)  Dubie I love 7-zip just for that reason. 
(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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Unfortunately, relocated media cannot be found automatically by Camtasia. So it's a gotcha for sure.You can always re-link manually using Windows file "Search engine" to locate the files by name if need be. It can cut down on time searching can be a real time killer if there's a lot of files.
I don't know if it's practical to zip your previous projects individually?"The ones most likely to be reused and accessed".

 For myself personally, I've found opening old projects is rarely an issue.I have them on file but never need to open them.

I realize educators, employers and others have the need to update, delete or alter aspects on occasion.

Your in a classic Catch 22 situation.

Sometimes moving forward requires ripping off the band-aid first.  I wish you luck with your decision.

Regards,Joe
(Edited)
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Mrs.Notetaker

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Thanks Joe.  I am hoping that TechSmith really takes a look at this. Giving us the power to choose which local drive to do our work on or, moving locations of items (buried within someone's profile)  out to another local drive would be a time saver and present a better user experience.  Please let us set our own paths to things.     
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craig

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Hi Sue, if you are comfortable using Windows' command prompt, you could create a soft link, which would redirect any and all files from directory "A" to directory "B" (and directory "B" could be on the same drive as "A", or it can be on any other drive on you PC -- even an external USB drive or a network drive, as long as it has a drive letter).

The command line utility that performs this function is called "junction.exe"
It is available from here:
https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/downloads/junction

Basically, once you use junction to create the link, then any access (reading or writing) will be redirected to the destination that you had set-up via the junction command.  And you need only perform the command one time, and the created link will remain there, forever, or until you choose to delete it.

This redirection works for any program.  Once a junction link is in place, Windows simply redirects all traffic accordingly, no matter what the program is (well, except for a program designed specifically to do file system maintenance -- such programs can sometimes identify these links -- but this is not applicable to 99.99% of desktop software).

There are programs that simply insist on writing to the C drive, which many people try to reserve for their OS, and there is no other way (that I know of) to direct the data to a different location.

Please note that, in order to have junction.exe create the correct link, you must identify the current directory that Camtasia is using, and you must identify the directory on your D drive (or wherever) to which you want the data to be sent.  You will need to supply the current location and the new location to the command line when you use junction.exe to create the link.

Before junction.exe can create the link, you have to do the following:
  • make sure Camtasia is not running.
  • if it does not already exist, create the destination directory (the place to where you want your files to go).
  • manually move all files, from where they are currently, to the new location.
  • delete the original directory (which should now be empty).
Now you can run the junction command.  Once that is done, Camtasia (or any other program) will run like nothing ever happened, except their files will go to your new location.

If you would like a video tutorial on performing these steps, let me know.  I am new to Camtasia, but I think that I can record the steps and post it here.

Cheers!
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joyellejolie.sparqls

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Craig, that's a brilliant option that I hadn't thought of! It would be useful in so many situations! I'd be very interested in seeing a recording of the process for using junction with Camtasia.Thanks!