Please appraise the videos on quality , format and content

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  • Updated 6 months ago
Please appraise on format, quality, content & structure
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werner.van.den.e

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  • feeling ready and able

Posted 6 months ago

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Rick Stone

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Hi there

We need more information to go on here. Are you able to restate what you are looking for? Are you asking about videos supplied by TechSmith? Or videos you create? Or what?
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werner.van.den.e

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Hello,
Its about a video I posted using Camtasia software.as part of a videocourse
regards
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werner.van.den.e

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erratum. do not publish Just feedback
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Rick Stone

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Hi there

I'll be happy to offer my own observations.

The recording of the head shot in the lower right corner needs some work. It's very distracting in the following ways:
  • The recording has an odd moving fluctuation as if there were some kind of reflecting pond splashing moving light on the subject. It becomes very distracting.

  • The person being recorded is obviously looking off to his right to presumably read a script. I would think it would be much more effective to position the script straight on where the eyes are looking directly at the camera. Perhaps a short introduction that is full screen, then cutting to the slides with the images.
I'm sure others will offer different advice.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Brian Nystrom

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The "talking head" appears to be something that was recorded off of a CRT (tube-style TV or computer monitor). I've seen that kind of banding in such recordings.
(Edited)
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Mal Reynolds

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I'm afraid I have to agree about the lighting, but for mine the more distracting part is that the speech appears to be out of sync. I can understand the appeal of having someone talking to the audience rather than having a disembodied voice; it seems more personal. (Admittedly I always go for the latter because I really don't like the way I look on camera, but still...)

It would be OK to keep a brief introduction to let people see your face, then just drop it which solves your problems with both the light and lip sync at the same time. I wouldn't give up on the idea of having you down there talking in future videos, but you'll need to put in a bit of work to find how to get it to be more "videogenic".

Also the audio could do with some enhancement; it sounds very "muffly" and a bit echoey at the moment. There is a free piece of software called Audacity which can clean up audio nicely, and the following video offers you an easy guide to doing a quick cleanup:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYF5ytMDFpA

(The video does start with "What is going on, guys?" which usually causes me to instantly slam a video shut, but in this case the content is worth watching so I made an exception.)

Just remember that you should export and re-import as .wav format; .mp3 seems to have some sync issues in Camtasia.

Granted that I could not understand a word of it (well, a few words, because my Dutch is fractionally, but only fractionally, better than my Swahili), but the graphics looked good and professionally done, and added to rather than distracting from the item.

I think you're heading in the right direction for getting a very watchable video.
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Mal Reynolds

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I'm afraid I have to agree about the lighting, but for mine the more distracting part is that the speech appears to be out of sync. I can understand the appeal of having someone talking to the audience rather than having a disembodied voice; it seems more personal. (Admittedly I always go for the latter because I really don't like the way I look on camera, but still...)

It would be OK to keep a brief introduction to let people see your face, then just drop it which solves your problems with both the light and lip sync at the same time. I wouldn't give up on the idea of having you down there talking in future videos, but you'll need to put in a bit of work to find how to get it to be more "videogenic".

Also the audio could do with some enhancement; it sounds very "muffly" and a bit echoey at the moment. There is a free piece of software called Audacity which can clean up audio nicely, and the following video offers you an easy guide to doing a quick cleanup:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=TYF5ytMDFpA

(The video does start with "What is going on, guys?" which usually causes me to instantly slam a video shut, but in this case the content is worth watching so I made an exception.)

Just remember that you should export and re-import as .wav format; .mp3 seems to have some sync issues in Camtasia.

Granted that I could not understand a word of it (well, a few words, because my Dutch is fractionally, but only fractionally, better than my Swahili), but the graphics looked good and professionally done, and added to rather than distracting from the item.

I think you're heading in the right direction for getting a very watchable video.
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Joe Morgan

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Hello werner.van.den.e,
I believe the problem you're encountering with the lighting issues on your face. Is because you've used some sort of a camcorder to record yourself, or some other video recording device. That is set to record at 60 frames a second. Using interlacing instead of progressive as the save format.

If that's the case, you want to change the settings of the camera to 60 FPS progressive or 60 FPS p.
Or 30 FPS p. Whatever the camera offers.

Some of the more inexpensive cameras. Only offer 30 FPS p as opposed to 60 FPS interlaced.

Aside from that, some of the images you used. Should be of a higher resolution so they are not so soft and blurred around the edges. Ideally, you want your images to fill the screen. Or be larger than the canvas area so they have to be scaled down. Rather than scaled up To prevent that blurring. High quality photo editors can easily upscale an image and produce minimal blurring. There are also ways to convert images to vector graphics and upscale them as well. There are several ways to skin the cat. So to speak.

However, the best way to win that game. Is to have graphics that are actually large enough without further manipulation to begin with.

Regards, Joe