Poor audio quality in Camtasia Studio 8?

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I've been recording video game commentaries for a while and have used Camtasia Studio 8 to edit and splice clips together for about a year now, but only recently have I been experiencing a strange problem with the audio quality in Camtasia Studio.

my microphone is set to record at about 48000 Hz and it sounds pretty good, but when I import the footage (which is linked with the audio), it sounds terrible, about half that quality. and it's not just when I play it on the timeline, either. the audio quality is still bad after I export the video. I know it's a problem with Camtasia Studio itself because when I play the video in VLC media player or Windows Live Movie Maker, it sounds perfectly fine.

I've tried to fix this myself but to no avail. help please?
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Marionetta Susette

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Posted 5 years ago

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Joe Morgan

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Camtasia 8 is not very user friendly when it comes to audio.
If you can convert the audio to a .wav file 44,100Hz at 16 bits. That's what Camtasia processes well. If you can change the settings on your microphone to the same that will work also.
Regards, Joe
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Marionetta Susette

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but it was working fine a few months ago, and I've recorded about five hours of footage so I would really rather not redo it or put it in WMM because there is some stuff I would like to crop, and cropping's not available in WMM.
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Joe Morgan

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You can convert the audio with a free program like Audacity.
If you updated Camtasia to a newer version that may be what happened.

All I know is that 48,000Hz throws Camtasia for a loop more than any frequency I am aware of.
There are a number of questions in this forum that suggest audio conversion is the way to go.
I tried to find one of these questions without success. But TechSmith merges a lot of questions together and all the original " Questions and Responses" are blended into Oblivion as a result of the merge.

Here is one Example posted from me  a long time ago. I will attempt to find a better one. The audio problem was different, but the solution was the same.https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/audio-starts-over-no-matter-where-its-started-from

The advice to convert the audio to { .wav  44,100Hz 16 bit } to improve audio quality. Has been posted by TechSmith on several occasions as well.

To me, Camtasia 8 has been out for over two years now and this should have been fixed a very long time ago. Every maintenance release seems to fix some things. Then create a new set of problems. That's the unfortunate truth. Sorry about that.

Regards, Joe
(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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I found a couple of Examples. There are many more I just can't locate anymore.

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/need_assistance_audio_issues_in_camtasia?

 

https://feedback.techsmith.com/techsmith/topics/camtasia_studio_makes_the_sound_recorded_by_fraps_sound_bad?



Converting the entire video can reduce the quality of the video. I would avoid touching the video whenever possible. Joe
(Edited)
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Marionetta Susette

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thank you. the audio and video are attached, however, so how would I go about separating them without ruining the audio quality? would going back to Camtasia Studio 7 help at all? thanks again.
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Kelly Mullins, TechSmith Employee & Helper

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Hi Marionetta,

I'm sorry you are having this trouble.
Are you saying the last time you used Camtasia Studio, everything was working correctly? That was a few months ago?

Since that time, have you done any Windows updates, or other system updates?
Have yo updated your Camtasia Studio software since then?

Becasue Camtasia was working correctly the last time you used it, I hesitate to say this is just an issue with Camtasia Studio. It sounds like somewhere along the line an update may have occurred and is now creating a conflict with Camtasia.

Can you check your Help > About screen and tell us what version you have installed?

I can't say if going back to a previous version of Camtasia will work for you since the conflict may still exist. Also, if you recorded with Camtasia Studio 8's TREC format, you cannot open those files in a previous version.

Kelly
User Assistance Team
TechSmith
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Marionetta Susette

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I honestly have no idea, but I'm pretty sure my microphone was set to record at 48000 Hz last time I used Camtasia too, so it may have been a Windows update or it may have been a Camtasia Studio update. I do not use Camtasia to record, only to edit, so I would be able to use the files in a previous version.
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Joe Morgan

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It's been my personal experience that anything sent to record at 48,000 Hz can introduce problems. Regardless of what version of Camtasia 8 you happen to be running. Maybe you could contact tech support and get a solution?

 In the meantime. If you place your video on the timeline, in Camtasia. You can export the audio as a.wav file. Then you can do a conversion in whatever piece of software you happen to you have access to.

 Then, when you get ready to edit. Place your video on the timeline. Right click and select separate video and audio. Delete the original audio. Import and place your new audio file in the time line. Do that before you do any editing so that your audio is lined up correctly.

 I personally do all my audio work in Adobe addition. It just handles audio better than Camtasia. In the long run, as long as I export at 44,100 Hz , 16 bits and in the.wav format. I never have any problem with my audio.

I'm including an image of how to export audio. See image below, click to enlarge.

 Good luck to you, regards, Joe

(Edited)
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kkolencik

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This is verrrrry close to what I did (below).  However, I lost quality when I brought the video in and tried to export so I had to use other software.  Really good post, though.  In hindsight, this makes perfect sense!
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Fred Grover, Champion

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I would agree with what Joe had to say on this subject. Let us know how it works out for you.
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Patrick Palmer

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My latest update to 8.5.2 fixed the issue.
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Fred Grover, Champion

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Thanks for posting back Patrick and I am glad it resolved your problem. Have a great day/night.
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kkolencik

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I had a remarkably similar situation, but no help from the update.  I thought I'd post my workaround.  (I say workaround, because I don't consider this a final solution - it requires other software and takes up too much time.  I'd like for Camtasia to happily accept my intact .MTS files for my editing enjoyment.)

I ended up needing to pull just the audio out of my .MTS video file (the format that comes straight from my camera).  This is where I somewhat awkwardly admit that I used a competitor's software.  I brought the video in and exported just the audio as .WAV, 44,100 Hz sampling rate.  Importing THIS audio made Camtasia happy at last, giving me back my audio quality.  I'm not thrilled to have to have my audio and video separate, though.  (Again, workaround.)

Why don't I just move to the competitor's software then?  I find Camtasia SO easy and fast to use it's sort of like the simple sugar of software in my world.  If this isn't resolved, though, I might need to shut myself off from the world to lynda.com a few hours and make the change in order to handle the large volume of video work that lies ahead.

Come on, Camtasia.  I <3 you.  Can we please work this out?  ;)
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arjandewit

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Same issues here with Camtasia 8.6.0 (Windows 8.1 64 bits). The audio within the recorded MP4 has a sampling rate of 48,000Hz (16 bit) and it sounds terribly bit-crushed after importing it to Camtasia.
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gguckenberger

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Yep same issue here too.  This worked fine a few months ago and now the audio quality is horrible.  I am using Windows Pro 64bit and Camtasia 8.6.0.  Please fix this TechSmith
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Rocky RockTeam

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^^^
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joe

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I agree.  As an audio professional,  I work with video editors daily. I'm trying Camtasia as a quickie tool for screencasting and editing my demo reels (again...  I provide music and sounds to video editors...  but I'm not one).  

All of my audio files and videos I've worked with are 48kHz, since that is the standard for video production. Importing these videos into Camtasia....  it sounds terrible. 

It's also frustrating that I couldn't find any audio properties options or other information in the manual. 48kHz support should be the default for video...  it's industry standard since the 1990s. 
(Edited)
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tabathaeatherly

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I'm glad I finally found this thread, I've been using Camtasia since 2011 and I loved the product's simplicity and editing ease of use for high volume screen capture and narration. At work I've been asked to make edits to webex recordings that are saved as mp4 files. I know the inputs aren't great with people using their phones to record but the original webex file audio still sounds okay when played.

However, once I bring it into Camtasia 8 and do a little editing to the video (I don't even touch the audio many times) and export back out everything sounds horrible,  very tinny, with a metallic twang. I've tried to correct the issue by separating the audio and video in Camtasia and then exporting the audio to Adobe Audition where I normalize, compress, remove background noise, I'm looking at reverb levels, echo, etc... but still can't get the audio to sound as good as the original webex recording.

What is going on, I'm not an audio engineer... just an overworked instructional designer/elearning developer in healthcare IT and I really need help figuring out if it's Camtasia 8. 

If it is Camtasia, what does everyone recommend to use instead for video editing? I have Adobe CC and could use Adobe Premiere.
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Joe Morgan

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Try exporting your audio from Audition using these settings. This is the holy grail for Frequency and formats when using Camtasia.


I clean up most of my audio in Audition as well and it sounds great in my projects.

Regards, Joe
(Edited)
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tabathaeatherly

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Joe,

I really appreciate your quick response to my post. In between editing I had quickly scanned through the previously posted comments where you mentioned this solution so it didn't really click. Now I understand why the audio was so awful. When I opened the original MP4 in Adobe Audition (I appreciated that it split the audio from the video automatically since I've never had to do this before). I went to Save As and looked at the audio settings. The Webex audio was encoded at 8000 Hz Mono, 32-bit, .wav.

No wonder Camtasia didn't like it. I did a quick background noise reduction on the entire audio file and saved it with the settings you listed above and then imported it into Camtasia to do my video editing. Finally, something that works!!! Thank you, my project was small but had to be out of the door by EOB today. I've had so many issues with all of the other video/audio files I've been sent over the last couple of months but now I have an answer. I have scoured forums for Adobe Audition and watched a lot of audio editing videos trying to solve this problem...I didn't want to think it was Camtasia before today!
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rduarte

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I was having trouble with the audio quality sounding bad after making edits to the soundtrack (clicks, pops, other artifacts near the edits). I believe it's related to this same issue of sample rate. The headset that I have (Turtle Beach PX22 - not recommended for Mac users btw) doesn't allow me to change the sample rate from 48kHz. I was about to give up but I think I may have found a workaround..
  1. Open the Camtasia project
  2. Right-click on the clip in the Media bin and choose "Reveal in Finder"
  3. Open that .trec file in Camtasia and work with that instead
I'm not sure exactly how this has resolved the problem (maybe just luck) but I have no quality issues with the project afterwards. I redid the same edits in the new file and all sounds good.  Both exported videos (before and after the above actions) say 44.1kHz in Quicktime player, so I'm not sure this workaround is legit. For the time being, however, I'm going to go with this process just after recording and before editing. If that doesn't work, I'll be stuck buying new hardware and trying again. :(
(Edited)
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zakaria KADDARI

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Hi !

Am having the same issue, the solution that I have found and that am using right now is to import the mp4 video file into Audacity and export audio from there as .wav 16bits, and then in Camtasia seperate audio from video, delete the original audio and import the new wav instead.
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Monica R

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That may just, somewhat be the answer to my question, "Should I simply use Audacity to record the narration and only use Camtasia to record the video?" Seems like, Zakaria, it would save me time rather than record audio in Camtasia, then separate the vid/audio, then import into Audacity...make the tweeks, then export back into Camtasia.

Feedback anyone?
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Joe Morgan

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I record narration as I record my video, then I edit the video in Camtasia.

If I need to add or edit some bits and pieces of some narration in the editor, I do so. Then I export the narration as a .wav file and edit in Adobe Audition.

If you have background music or another audio track. You won't want to export that at the same time.You just turn off that track "Or tracks" by clicking the track eyeball(s).

Regards,Joe
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kayakman, Champion

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if possible, record your narrations along with your screen captures, using Camtasia Recorder; I find this to be the fastest method by far, and usually results in the most natural narration cadence; if the audio quality is a little off, you can then export the audio [export audio only on share menu], as a WAV file, open that WAV in Audacity, and clean up as required; export from Audacity [as a WAV], import the audio back into your CS project; silence the original audio in the project, put the new WAV on timeline, and you should be good to go 

out of the box, my CS9 audio is very good as-is, but Audacity's noise removal can easily/quickly fix things