Preparing a collection of Instructional Videos

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Sigh. I wanted to make a series of instructional videos. I created what looks like someone made a video of a robot's arm. The robot arm doesn't actually exist. The mp4 is really an output of Camtasia of a set of still images. I like to keep my videos at about 5min length because all my children explain to me..."nobody watches a video longer than 5 minutes"  So I made a collection and sent them to YouTube. Here's the first one of the series: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tQ9vm9Le_wE  Here's the final mp4 of the arm movement: https://pistonrobot.com/wp-content/uploads/2018/07/Camera-01-using-the-closeup-camera-v1.mp4
 But, alas, I'm in one of the States where the weather is hot hot hot. I need to run an air conditioner in my computer room just to survive. I'm using the AudioTech2020USB+ and it picks up that air conditioner and just adds this annoying drone noise in the videos. I wish I could run Camtasia with no one talking and let it pick up this air conditioner noise and then I could tell Camtasia, Please, Camtasia, remove this background noise from my audio file..... wouldn't that be neat! pg
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P Gray

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  • I'm happy I can make the videos, I just want my A/C

Posted 4 months ago

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SueG

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I have the same issue.   Most of the time it can take out the background humming from the airconditioner AND fan by using the audio effect "noise removal", but there are times that when I apply the noise removal effect to the audio it makes it sound really strange, so I have to remove that and leave the buzzing noize.   Anyway, have you tried the "noise removal" effect?
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bnystrom

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I didn't notice any background noise in the first minute or two of the video, but perhaps it's because of the background noise in my office. I've always got some low-level HVAC noise in the background,  but it doesn't seem to be prevalent in the recordings. Perhaps it's because I speak reasonably loudly and that improves the signal-to-noise ratio. 
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Kelly Rush, Product Manager

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Hi phgray-office!

As SueG pointed out, Camtasia does have some noise removal tools, so it might be worth giving those a try to see if it gets you where you need to go. Another trick that I use sometimes, if your voice is recorded at a high enough level, you can have a light, appropriate background music track play throughout the length of the video. As long as the noise isn't too loud, the music generally helps cover any of that up, while at the same time helping to add some additional pizazz to the video for the viewers.

Thanks for sharing your video and feedback, cheers!

Kelly
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SueG

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I would also like to know why the effect "noise removal" does not always work.   I will say a few words then purposely leave a few seconds blank.  In that blank area is where I always apply the noise removal effect.   It works about 75% of the time, but when it does not the sound becomes very garbled!  Any ideas why?
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kayakman, Champion

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I use the same mic for all my tutorial screencasts, it's definitely sensitive; I also work in a "hard" room with excellent ambiance, but any remote noises going on the the facility are also picked up during captures; I also work with my windows open [have to have fresh air], so any outside noises get added in

for noise reduction, I use free Audacity; it does an excellent job

How To Apply Noise Reduction Using Audacity
http://www.screencast.com/t/WN3ehg03zkZM
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SueG

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Wow, Kayakman, thank you for sharing that!   I will definitely try that out next time the noise removal effect does not work for me in Camtasia!
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Joe Morgan

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I use an Andrea USB Stereo headset with a directional mic and noise cancellation built into the mic.
I run a window air conditioner about 12 feet to my left. The  mic eliminates about 90% of the air conditioning noise. I really can't here it in the recording.I can see it in Adobe Audition in the wave form where I process my audio.

Oh sure, I can hear it if I crank up the volume in a quite area with just the air running in the background. It isn't a Magic microphone. But you could run the audio as is. And the audio would sound quite good.


https://www.amazon.com/Andrea-Electronics-C1-1022600-1-Canceling-Microphone/dp/B003LY5RCS/ref=sr_1_f...
Regards,Joe
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P Gray

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Thanks everyone for your kind and thoughtful replies. I think I kind of truncated my post and managed to leave out some points. I shoud note at the outset that I have applied pretty significant Camtasia based sound leveling and noise removal to the sound track of all of the videos. I wanted to create a series of instructional videos that lead up to demonstrating how to make an mp4 out of a sequence of pictures. I thought I'd better get the robot clearly described so people would be familiar with it. I've made so far 12 videos in the series and sent them to YouTube. All of these YouTube videos already have Camtasia based sound leveling and noise reduction in them.  All of the art in the videos and the 3D drawings I need to make myself, so it takes awhile to put together a video. So there's days when the A/C is on and days when it isn't, which means there are videos that I made with the A/C on and videos where the A/C is off. I really just got tired of having to keep moving my schedule so that I would only make videos when it was cool enough to turn off the A/C, and August is coming. It is my understanding that in the world of sound and signal processing that sound "profiles" can be created. I feel that for most people and most A/C's, their room and their pieces of equipment in that room that create extraneous noises are all going to be pretty consistent over time. My thought was, "Why not turn on the A/C, turn on Camtasia recording, make a 5 min recording of the room with all its ambient noise including the noises added by the A/C, and record this sound track with me not speaking. Then save that audio track. Then tell Camtasia to analyze that audio track and request that Camtasia create an audio management protocol that Camtasia could apply if I asked Camtasia to do so. Then, if I made a video in that same room where I was talking and the A/C was on, then I could take the audio track of that audio (the one where I am talking) and tell Camtasia to apply that sound management protocol that Camtasia has already made concerning this room with this A/C and apply that sound management protocol to my sound track where I am talking. The effect of me asking Camtasia to do this sound signal processing would be that "like magic" I would have my voice narration and all that A/C noise would be gone. Yay for me! Whew. I will go through the videos and see if I can find one where the A/C droning in the background is just a real nuisance. The final plan, once I have enough introductory videos that I think everyone understands the robot well enough, is for me to let Camtasia "show" the folder of the individual renders of the robot arm, then import these renders into Camtasia, then make a video where Camtasia is actually videorecording itself creating a video from these renders. Camtasia filming Camtasia.... would that be cool or what? But I haven't gotten to creating those videos yet because I'm worried people will get "stuck" on the robot and questions like the robot moves and its not real and there's a video of a non-existent item and what is going on exactly??? I'm just afraid I will lose my audience. And, of course, when I finally have enough time to make a recording, it is hot as blazes outside and that A/C is running.... so I thought, well, I'll ask the Camtasia gang and see what they say.  again, thanks, everyone.  My next project is to import the robot into AutoDesk Maya and make a video of me rigging the robot in Maya.....HaHaHa.. I guess I shouldn't be so pessimistic. Hope springs eternal.   pg
(Edited)
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kayakman, Champion

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Camtasia's noise reduction is not very robust; I can never use it; it basically never works for me; try Audacity, it is free and works great; it can do a lot of audio editing tricks besides bullet-proof noise reduction; perhaps give it a try
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rg

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Leveling and noise reduction are like having sledgehammers when you need a scalpel.
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Ed Covney

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I've used CooleditPro for years and assuming Audacity is similar, you'll to "sample" a noise frame (a second or two), then filter the noise and finally apply the  filter to the entire track.
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rg

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Back when I had a free version of CoolEdit (it came with the old Macromedia Director, I think) I was very impressed with its intuitive interface and excellent tools.  I used CoolEdit96 later with similar results.  Maybe I should just pony up and buy this program!  Audacity is a bit complicated looking for my purposes.
(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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I recorded my voice using the microphone I mentioned above. I have my air conditioning running.

I uploaded a .wav file of that recording so you can download it and have a listen. I recorded it with Camtasia's recorder.
Placed the file on the timeline in Camtasia 2018 and exported the audio as a .wav file.



It's untouched RAW audio.
I couldn't upload to Screencast or Vimeo or anywhere else. They won't accept .wav files and they re-encode video. What you need is to hear the audio as it truly sounds.

http://www.mediafire.com/file/vuh7c1z1s4j3cfc/Andrea%20Noise%20Canceling%20Mic.wav
I've been impressed by this mic ever since I got it. I think you will be to.

I'm not crazy about headsets, but to me. It's much better then fighting with desktop mics that are so sensitive they can pick up a fly landing on the monitor and a light summer breeze.

Regards,Joe
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Joe Morgan

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So, audio that doesn't require noise reduction is preferred.

However, Unless your in a sound studio or a sound controlled environment.You will probably need some noise reduction.
Less is more in the case of audio. The cleaner the original track is the better.If you need to record with the AC running. A noise reducing directional mic is superior to most mics.

I Recorded with my AC running and a duel condenser  stereo mic. Just so you could hear how loud my AC unit is first hand. This is an unedited .wav file. http://www.mediafire.com/file/xruya8pv9pra7rj/Air%20Condition%20Noise.wav

Download both files and compare the audio quality from the unedited noise reduction mic. 
  http://www.mediafire.com/file/sigz69zpqgdotnp/Air%20Conditioning%20Noise%20demo.wav

If the difference doesn't impress you, I would be surprised.


More info on the mic is posted above.
Regards,Joe

(Edited)
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P Gray

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Thanks again everyone. Sigh... I like my AT2020USB+ its bright shiny and has a blue light on it. I never thought through about noise pollution. I will check out the Audacity. I've just got to see what will help. I guess if i must get a mic with builtin noise abatement.... it just seems there could be a software solution where the software interposes itself in between the  mic and Camtasia and the software "cleans up" the sound. we'll see. and thanks again. pg
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kayakman, Champion

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again, I use the same mic, I pick up a lot of noise, Audacity does an excellent job on noise removal, based on my experiences, and it's quick and easy to accomplish 
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Joe Morgan

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Built in noise removal mics aren't critical.I use Adobe audition. You can target any noise and eliminate those noises specifically.

However,  practically all noises.Especially the drone of an air conditioner. Fall into the range of your voice.So as you remove these sounds in post. You are also affecting/removing the sound of your voice. Because the noise removal required is aggressive in nature.

That's why I prefer to use a noise canceling mic. My voice sounds normal in the recording.Aggressive noise removal isn't required in post. Did you listen to my recording  examples? They speak for  themselves.  
(Edited)
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rg

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What you really need is not noise removal as such -- you need noise cancellation, which is different.  Noise cancellation samples a sound and reproduces it with an inverted wave -- thus the waves cancel each other out.  It works best with sounds that repeat, such as an MRI machine, jackhammers, airplane (jet or prop), and (yes!) air conditioning, which is fairly regular/repeatable.  I don't know of any noise cancellation technology in video editing software.  Sound editors have that capability (e.g. Adobe Audition).
However:  You can try a sound shield/block.  This is a physical barrier that basically encloses you and your mic in a smaller, confined space, blocking out most other ambient sound.  They sell these everywhere (Amazon has a curving one that is popular).
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SueG

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@rg, I found several on Amazon, which would you suggest?   Thanks for the great idea!  My office has a window in it and all the noise from around the neighbors and across the street comes in!
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rg

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I have this on my wish list:
https://www.amazon.com/dp/B00WRHTVS6/
It is the LyxPro VRI-20 Portable Acoustic Foam Isolation Microphone Shield, Sound Absorbing, Vocal Recording Panel, High Performance - Stand Mount.

Now, bear in mind that this item just wraps around the mic.  I like it because it's relatively small.  Also, if you use a desk mic I recommend sticking that old, now-unused, thick foam mouse pad under the mic stand.  (Although it is not a true sound blocker, the foam will cushion many vibrations.)

Acoustic panels are useful to deaden some noise -- you set them up behind you.  (Or you can hang up a thick drape behind you.)  Note that deadening sound does not block it -- if you REALLY want to block sound, you need to talk to a pro (years ago, I bought panels from Acoustics First in Virginia -- they give good advice and won't steer you wrong).

The fastest and cheapest alternative is to block off the air conditioning during recording.  We do it all the time on video shoots.

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SueG

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Thanks for the link!  I cannot turn off the air conditioning (I try turning fans off) because it is 110 to 120 degrees outside!  My home office is an oven :(   I record almost daily for several hours, so this would be tough with no cool air!
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Joe Morgan

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Hello SueG,
And anyone else who's paying attention.........

So, the 1st 2 and half minutes of this video is 100 percent raw unedited audio from an Andrea noise canceling microphone. A 8,000 BTU window air conditioner was running and the fan was on high. I recorded the audio through Camtasia and I didn’t alter it one bit.

The last 30 seconds is recorded with a handheld condenser mic to demonstrate how loud the air conditioner is. In all fairness, the air conditioner is actually louder than the microphone picked up. It’s pretty obnoxious when it comes right down to it.

I uploaded a couple of audio files so people could hear the difference and nobody downloaded them. So I figured if I created a video maybe people would take the time to listen.

There is no more economical approach than this one. But you be the judge, just listen to the video.

Regards, Joe






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Ed Covney

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I'm sold, just ordered one from Amazon,  Thank You Joe !!
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SueG

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Wow, your sound is really great!  I may have to rethink my setup!
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Joe Morgan

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The reason I purchased that mic was for use with Dragon NaturallySpeaking. That’s the voice recognition software that dictates text into a document from your voice. I’m actually using it to dictate this message right now. Nuance is the company that creates the software.

They gave this microphone a 5 Dragon rating. The highest rating for any microphone for use with the program. In order for Dragon to dictate your words accurately, it has to recognize/hear your words with precision at all times. An inferior microphone will not do.

I’m still not a huge fan of headsets, but I’ve grown accustomed to it over time. It’s also wired, which from what I understand is ideal. Because wireless mics can pick up interference.

So really, I stumbled into this microphone purchase by accident. And I’ve been a happy camper ever since. If you find you don’t like it, and purchase it through Amazon. It’s a piece of cake to send it back.

Regards, Joe

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Joe Morgan

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So Ed Covney,

I'm sure you'll like the mic. One tip. They tell you to curl the mic arm around and position the mic in front of your mouth. I think they recommend a finger widths or 2 of separation between the mic and your mouth.
That doesn't work for me.You get a lot of "S" sounds and Popping. It just doesn't work well at all.At least it didn't for me.Regardless of mic recording levels.I struggled with this for a while.

I have my microphone recording levels set to 94 in Windows Recording Settings. I use the mic with the boom pointed straight out in front of me. No curve in the Arm/Boom.It's parallel with the side of my face.
It works great like that!

You may find a different placement works better for you.I went through some trial and error.Some frustration and disappointing recordings, and then I ignored the instructions. {:>)

(Edited)
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Ed Covney

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I'll experiment with mic position as you suggest. Thanks again Joe.
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P Gray

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well i am considering the issues. from an analytical viewpoint the noise cancelling mic at $33 has 4 parts, it has 2 earphones, a mic, and noise cancelling software built into it (I guess a chip connected to the mic), so the money spent on the mic is $8.00  The AT mic has no other items except the mic components at $149.00  I guess the AT mic could be overpriced, or be set to pick up the wrong kinds of sounds.... I don't know, its hard to argue with sample sound tracks, on the other hand its hard not to wonder if a mic that has $149.00 worth of parts in it perhaps has a better recording profile. I don't know.  Humans are so strange, its hard not to wonder if the $8.00 mic recordings added into videos could produce videos that start out pretty much OK, but with time they would become irritating because the sound was just "not quite right, or not quite pleasing", I just don't know. It seemed that noise effecting software could be put in place between the mic and the Camtasia sound writing portion of Camtasia. Then one gets all the benefits of the more expensive mic, and the benefits of sound related processing (noise removal, noise cancelling). I was hoping that Camtasia would consider to add that type of sound affecting software to Camtasia. Then one gets the higher priced mic, hopefully the higher quality mic, and also sound processing (I guess the sound processing is more sound cancellation than noise removal). I feel I need to get my videos up to the web so I just decided to try to wait until its nice enough to stop the A/C and use the expensive mic that I already have so I can keep working. Ya' never know when something winds up being complicated. pg
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Joe Morgan

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Consider this, that so called 8 dollar mic works better than yours in a noisy environment.
It's only designed to record your voice. Nothing more, nothing less. A very limited sound range. 100- 10,000 Hz


I'm sure you mic has a wider frequency range and is suited for recording multiple persons  at the same time.
It's also capable of picking up every little distraction in the room.  So, price isn't everything.
Bottom line, you've got issues with your mic, and I don't.

Andrea has a analog version of the same mic.No headset, just a head mount.


But you've got to purchase a analog to USB digital converter as well.So the setup is $60 instead of around $40.
I've gotten used to the headset.I don't use the speakers, but they actually block out the sound of the air conditioner somewhat. So it's not all bad.