Problem with the capture file in.avi

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  • Updated 4 weeks ago
Hello I have a problem with several files recorded with camtaisa, in the options I put for the software to record in.avi, but after I finished record, well I can not read the file on camtasia or other software so it has a solution?
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playgamesjeux07

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Posted 1 month ago

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David B. Demyan

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I think recording to AVI creates a "special" version of AVI that is only decoded by Camtasia. I tried importing a Camtasia-created AVI recording into Premiere and it came up blank.

However, if you allow the recorded AVI to open in Camtasia editor after recording and produce that same recording from Camtasia editor, you can make settings to retain near-lossless quality, if that is your goal. Use the AVI production preset in the Production Wizard and make the settings I show here.


(Edited)
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kayakman, Champion

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you can set full frames uncompressed AVI in Recorder/tools/options/inputs/video settings

avi has to be selected in tools/options/general
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playgamesjeux07

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In fact to answer you the.avi file I can't even open it on camtasia 
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Joe Morgan

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If you render a video uncompressed? Your file size will balloon Beyond Ridiculous portions. A 10 min. 1080p video could easily exceed 100GB.

I don't recommend doing this. EVER! There is no appreciable value in doing this.

A simple 1 minute render of a 1920 x 1080 video is 10.43 GB as depicted in the image below.


Red video cameras costing $25,000 and up. Capture in a uncompressed format. Every frame is like a RAW image taken with a DSLR.
They are of this high of a quality so you can do fantastic color correction, image manipulation, sharpening,etc. In a high end video editing application like Premiere Pro.

A screen recording doesn't contain or support enough information to warrant such a huge file.
Camera's the cost more than some cars do.

I would contact tech support to determine why your videos wont play back.  Along with telling them what you hope to accomplish.And see what they recommend }:>)


This is a Free Service............... Submit a ticket

       https://support.techsmith.com/hc/en-us/requests/new

Or call, >>>

 Toll Free: 800.517.3001 (U.S. & Canada Only)

8:00 AM to 7:00 PM EST Monday through Friday

Regards, Joe

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David B. Demyan

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I disagree. Preparing high-quality screen capture movies is required for e-learning, where Camtasia output can become very muddy looking very quickly in successive compressions. This is similar to making a paper copy of a paper copy. We have all seen the old-fashioned memes printed on copy paper and passed around an organization. By the time I got those, they were almost unreadable.

In cases of content published for e-learning on an LMS, and these cases only, I advocate starting with the highest quality video and audio before successive additional compressions in streaming services and e-learning authoring tools.

Publishing tutorials straight from Camtasia into a high-quality output stream does not require such a stringent approach to maintaining quality in successive compressions.
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playgamesjeux07

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In fact to answer you the.avi file I can't even open it on camtasia 

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Joe Morgan

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I discovered that the Windows 10 media player will not play AVI's created with the TechSmith screen codec 2.
I don't use that particular media player so I was unaware of the error.

I had no problem opening and watching AVI's Created with that codec in the Windows media player, VLC media player and classic media player.

I don't know if there's a way to get the Windows 10 media player to recognize new codecs are not?
However, at this point I would think another media player should serve you well. If not, then you should contact tech support.
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kayakman, Champion

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can you capture screen using Camtasia Recorder, saving as .trec file type instead of AVI?

do those captures work OK in Camtasia?

if you are capturing your PC screen, there is probably no reason to capture as AVI anyway?

.trec files are captures to AVI using TechSmith screen Codec 2 I believe

even if you capture to .trec files, you can extract the AVI video file
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Joe Morgan

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Rendering uncompressed AVI files was suggested earlier in this posting.

So, I wanted to back up what I had to say earlier with evidence. And provide some insight as to where I was coming from.

I recorded a six second video of my 1080 P monitor with two pages from a National Geographic magazine at 100 percent zoom level. Along with the user interface from Adobe Acrobat DC.

Then, I rendered that video using the TechSmith screen codec 2. Which is an AVI format.

I created a new project using that rendered video. I then re-rendered it using the same TechSmith screen codec 2. So I’ll call it a second generation video/rendering.

I repeated the steps until I had a video that has been re-rendered five times. With each iteration being created from the previous one. So technically, if the video is going to be degraded through re-rendering. The degradation would have occurred five times at this point. That’s a lot of degradation.

However, in the image below you will see a screenshot that has been extracted from the original unaltered .trec recording. Combined with the image extracted from the fifth rendering.



I had to render the image as a JPEG because this website will not allow the file size recovered to upload a PNG. Without telling you which one is the original or which one is the fifth generation rendering. I doubt you can tell the difference between them. I have provided the original PNG’s by uploading them to MediaFire.  If you’re interested in seeing them. I won’t tell you which is which. I would be curious if anybody can tell the difference between the two and pick out the worst one.

https://www.mediafire.com/view/m2gjoiwb8ayui83/bab.png/file

https://www.mediafire.com/view/9n3lg484ejdc0s7/aba.png/file

 

I extracted the original file. Then took screenshots of its properties. I also took screenshots of the rendered videos. The rendered videos had a smaller file size than the original. So I learned something unexpected today.



Nevertheless, I believe the fifth generation rendering looks if not every bit as good as the original. Close enough to the original quality that you probably won’t find any differences between the text quality, colors or anything else. And I’m talking while zooming in tight to very high levels in Photoshop and taking a serious look.

All of the re-rendered videos rendered at a data rate of 13.7 MB per minute.

That’s why I stated it’s ridiculous to render uncompressed AVI files for any reason. Certainly there are exceptions to the rules, but I can’t imagine what that rule would be with regards to Camtasia.

I rendered that same six second file uncompressed. That 6 second AVI came to be 1.04 GB in size.

So I did the math and converted 1.04 GB to MB. That equates to 1064.96 MB. If you divide that by the original file size of 2.83 MB. The sum I derived shows that the uncompressed AVI file is 376 times larger than the original file.



So hopefully this sheds some light on possible workflows if you intend on re-rendering videos by producing to AVI.

Compression is a deep subject that is often misunderstood. I’ve seen several references in this forum over the years suggesting to render to uncompressed AVI. I’ve never addressed the subject with this much depth.

My knowledge of compression is not deep. Although I feel what I do understand, I understand fairly well. If someone can enlighten me further I would appreciate it.

Regards, Joe