recommended video card

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Is there a recommended video card that is suggested?

I plan to use a HP probook w/ windows 10, 16 gb of RAM, Intel I7 processor, and would like to have something besides the on board video card.

What is everyone else using and have you had any issues?
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tonym

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Posted 1 year ago

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Rick Stone

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I'm not sure if a second video card would even be possible in that case. Hearing "ProBook" seems to suggest a laptop. And your choices are awfully limited when it comes to laptops. Especially in this day and age where they try everything they can to make them compact. Even adding more memory to a laptop is often a nightmarish process.

Cheers... Rick :)
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Joe Morgan

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I'm a dedicated Nvidia supporter.

A high end card is usually best. You need to be ordering the laptop with graphics card already installed to make sure it's compatible with the motherboard and all the components.
A lot of memory on the card is not always necessary. But it doesn't hurt to excess either.

Nvidia chat/help can help you make choices based on your needs.https://nvidia.custhelp.com/app/chat/chat_launch

Currently, Camtasia 2018 has some compatibility issues with Nvidia cards. Whereas Camtasia 9 does not.
You have to use the Microsoft basic driver in 2018 or some videos can appear washed out.My Nvidia card runs at around 50% efficiency on Microsoft drivers compared to the Nvidia drivers.
Heres 2 examples.
I'm sure TechSmith will get this straightened out one day.

You can use Camtasia 9 with a Camtasia 2018 key. And Camtasia 2018 is not that much different than Camtasia 9.So I wouldn't turn my back on Nvidia over this.


This doesn't effect .trec screen recordings. Just video from other sources.

This is from a Nikon D3300 Camcorder

 

This is from a recording using Shadow Play. A screen recorder utility for Nvidia graphics cards thats  free to download for 600 series or higher Nvidia cards.


Heres the support article associated with this issue.

https://support.techsmith.com/hc/en-us/articles/360005120411-Camtasia-Windows-Video-Is-Washed-out-on...

Regards,Joe

(Edited)
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Joe Morgan

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Okay,

I got a little follow-up for you tonym,

I think you might find the HP Pavilion gaming laptops a little more to your liking. Customizable ones are more flexible in their options.

You can get higher end graphics cards and the screens are a bit larger. I would imagine being a gaming laptop they are built with higher durability in mind as well.

Starting price for the standard HP Pavilion looks about the same as a HP Pro book.

Anyway, food for thought.

Let us know what you end up doing. I suggest you call HP and talk to a salesman yourself.

Regards, Joe

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Paul

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Hello tonym, 
I have a Surface Book 2, i7,  512GB SSD and a GTX 1060 6gb discrete graphics card. I know I'm a little late to the party but I was searching the internet to get some possible insight on the same topic. As your post seems to indicate that, "...plan to use..."; which I interpret as you already have the machine and was asking a question as to it's compatibility with a specific graphics card vendor. I know when I was looking I was looking to see if the poor performance when using the graphics card was because the software wasn't optimized for Nvidia cards and whether there are any cards it is optimized for. 

My experience with using the hardware acceleration (GTX 1060) as oppose to the software acceleration, I have found that Camtasia worked better with the software setting. At times there was erratic behavior from the computer when using the GTX settings. Based solely on that, I believe that it is not optimized to work well with Nvidia cards, or at least the my GTX 1060 and the RTX family. 

I do have a pretty powerful desktop with a water cooled RTX2080, 32 GB Ram and even for that machine I am using the same setting as my surface book 2, so I am sure it's a software optimization issue. I get pretty poor performance when I am working with video; not bad enough to abandon my efforts but not as good as what I expect from my hardware. Hopefully you get this post and come back and share your outcomes. I, am very eager to know how things are going for you and how the marriage between the software and your choice of hardware is going.

Thanks!!
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Ed Covney

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I'd start a conversation with an nVidia engineer  - don't forget to mention TechSmith, Camtasia your desktop and laptop systems. You have "hardware accelerations" questions right? nVidia may also have drivers (2080) specifically for that purpose (aside from gaming screen refresh rates).

The whole purpose of "hardware acceleration"  is to allow your graphics card to talk more directly with PCIe and Sata buses (storage) and avoid unnecessary journeys thru L3 or (L3,L2,L1, & CPU).

The end game here is that one day, Camtasia will be able to do 4K @ 120Hz using only video card acceleration, no need for your CPU, well almost.
If your laptop or desktop can use NVMe M.2 storage you would have better luck with hardware acceleration. M.2 drives can talk at near video card rates and bandwidth.
If you have an M.2 slot on the motherboard, you shouldn't have any problems (Intel 660p are on sale often at Newegg; $ 85. for 1TG,  $ 170 for 2 TB.  There are fully 10-15 times faster than SSDs mostly because of the bus 10GByte (up to 16 data lanes)  vs SSDs 6Gbit, 1 data lane.
But don't bother with add-on M.2 host cards PCIe x_16 (the only kind there are), they don't like sharing bandwidth with x16 video cards, an expensive lesson I learn  6 or 8 weeks ago. 
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Paul

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Hello Ed, 

That conversation has already begun, before I drafted my post and I am eagerly looking forward to getting their feedback. Currently, the system requirements outlined (https://www.techsmith.com/camtasia-system-requirements.html), although specifying the graphics chip vendor, doesn't go so far to mention neither the types of actual chipsets nor hard drive tech. However, when making my evaluation, I considered all that you have mentioned and have still come to the conclusion that the software simply isn't optimized to take advantage of this tech(well at least to my expectations, which may or may not be unreasonable).  
Thanks for your feedback.
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Ed Covney

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Hi Paul,
I think you missed my point, TechSmith can't help you with an nVidia problem . . . but nVidia may be able to help you with your (TechSmith) Camtasia problem.
" . . and have still come to the conclusion that the software simply isn't optimized to take advantage . . ." I'm not sure its a matter of optimization, its S/W learning how to talk to a video card directly (in Chinese) while maintaining a conversation with the CPU (in English).


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Paul

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Per Camtasia tech, "...Having a top of the line graphics card won't put you at an advantage because our software isn't designed with that kind of graphics power...". So that confirms that the software isn't optimized for use of tech that is in high powered graphics. BTW, I just got the response from them today, kudos to TechSmith support for the quick and informative response.

I didn't miss your point. If TechSmith's response was that their product was designed to perform optimally with my GTX 1060 or my RTX 2080,  then I would absolutely contact Nvidia. However, since the software isn't optimized for use with high powered graphics cards, (which I learned today) then my card provides no added advantage in performance. This makes sense to me now. I did indicate that under 'Hardware Acceleration' using  the '...Software...' works better. Since the software system requirements doesn't require a powerful graphics card and given the response from them, I would say at this point the software is doing what it is meant to do. 

I will continue using the software within it's listed capabilities. I will probably purchase a more advanced application to do the more advanced things I need to do. Since I own my own business it's not practical for me to try to get this to do more than it's capable of. However, if I was using it as a novelty, I probably would invest some time. 

Thanks Again!!